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Old 05-09-2018, 12:22 PM   #1
coralfang
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Is there any real world advantages of UEFI?


I've just got an SSD, which i am about to reinstall slackware onto (this will be the only OS present). I've never had any troubles with legacy boot with my motherboard, and i'm wondering... is it worth setting up an efi partition and using UEFI/ELILO?

Is there any real advantage to not using legacy BIOS/MBR to boot? I don't plan on having any windows, or secure boot nonsense on here, so if i install slackware with the MBR/LILO setup, is there actually going to be any noticeable difference? I ask, because i've never used UEFI/EFI to boot an OS.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 12:38 PM   #2
fatmac
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No difference that I've noticed between BIOS/UEFI - or for that matter between MBR or GPT.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 12:39 PM   #3
hazel
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I don't know about advantages. UEFI lets you modify boot variables from inside Linux as an alternative to pressing a special key while starting up; I've always found it difficult to press the key at exactly the right moment! It also puts all your boot code in normal files inside normal partitions and not in "magic spaces" like the MBR. That might make it easier to police boot sector viruses.

But the real argument in favour of learning UEFI is that legacy mode will not always exist.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 12:42 PM   #4
elcore
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There is no distro that force GPT on you, yet. It's just MS I think.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 02:26 PM   #5
coralfang
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Alright. I went ahead and made the partition table as GPT, then choosing to boot from MBR with LILO.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 03:24 PM   #6
jlinkels
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One day UEFI will supersede BIOS on mainboards. So the advantage is learning.

Having said that, being able to create as many primary partitions as you like is an advantage. UEFI might be a bit more complicated than BIOS, but hey, so many things have become more complicated to offer more options in the end.

jlinkels
 
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Old 05-09-2018, 04:42 PM   #7
jefro
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There are many real world advantages to UEFI over the fact that bios days are limited due to new hardware.

Most people currently never use or don't see the features of uefi.

As above, you will have to learn and use it soon.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 05:47 PM   #8
yancek
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Quote:
UEFI lets you modify boot variables from inside Linux as an alternative to pressing a special key while starting up;
Are you referring to efibootmgr? It seems pretty easy to use and functional but it was pretty simple to modify Grub Legacy or a non-EFI Grub2 with the text files in either bootloader, grub.conf/menu.lst or grub.cfg. Set the default entry to boot, set the timeout, change boot parameters, etc. Not sure what brand of computer you are using if you don't need to hit a special key to access BIO/Boot options as my EFI laptop requires me to hit a special key to make boot option selections or enter the BIOS, actually since it's an HP, I need to hit 2 keys to do either.

Quote:
It also puts all your boot code in normal files inside normal partitions
Not sure what you mean by normal files unless you mean text files. The only text files I see on the efi partition are the elilo.conf and the grub.cfg stub and some windows log files.

Quote:
But the real argument in favour of learning UEFI is that legacy mode will not always exist.
It's coming whether we want/like it or not and Legacy boot is on the way out. Better or not in what circumstances is debatable.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 06:32 PM   #9
coralfang
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
There are many real world advantages to UEFI over the fact that bios days are limited due to new hardware.

Most people currently never use or don't see the features of uefi.

As above, you will have to learn and use it soon.
I guess as long as the hardware i'm using still supports BIOS, i think i'm going to stick with that for now. Maybe in 5-10 years when i upgrade my mobo i suppose i'll have no choice but to use UEFI booting.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 07:18 PM   #10
hydrurga
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Sorry for linking to my own blog entry, but here's a summary of the main differences between BIOS and UEFI.

https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...vs-uefi-37503/
 
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Old 05-09-2018, 07:27 PM   #11
jefro
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You are correct that legacy may be around in some form for a long while. One can still order new 485 isa boards.

I think that the folks that have been exposed to larger hardware already are used to the way uefi works. Many of the larger machines use boot programs/boot boards much in the same way uefi works.

The specification is well documented and open for folks to actually build their bios.

https://firmware.intel.com/learn/uefi/about-uefi

Just think of uefi as more a mini OS and not some hard coded burned rom maybe.
 
Old 05-10-2018, 09:56 PM   #12
Nate_KS
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I like that since after installing rEFInd and setting it to load using the /boot/vmlinuz-generic symlink that I don't have to run lilo any more. I just regenerate the initrd after a kernel update and rEFInd loads the new one on the next boot. No fuss, no muss!
 
Old 05-11-2018, 06:14 AM   #13
Darth Vader
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The question "Is there any real world advantages of UEFI?" is something like "Is there any real world advantages of cars? (against ridding horses)"
 
Old 05-11-2018, 06:42 AM   #14
solarfields
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Quote:
The question "Is there any real world advantages of UEFI?" is something like "Is there any real world advantages of cars? (against ridding horses)"
is uefi superior?
 
Old 05-11-2018, 07:18 AM   #15
hydrurga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
The question "Is there any real world advantages of UEFI?" is something like "Is there any real world advantages of cars? (against ridding horses)"
I disagree. UEFI obviously has advantages but it all depends on what system you have set up, what functionality you need. If you have simple needs then BIOS is still fine. It's more like comparing an ordinary car to a sports car. Do you need the extra speed, handling, protection features, or not?
 
  


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