LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 08-11-2019, 08:09 AM   #46
rkelsen
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 2,241

Rep: Reputation: 566Reputation: 566Reputation: 566Reputation: 566Reputation: 566Reputation: 566

Quote:
Originally Posted by ehartman View Post
Yes, it did, in release 8.1, when the current package naming convention came in (7.x and 8.0 still used the 8+3 filename format) and thus enabled real updating.
You are correct, but I was referring to the appearance and interface of the installer.
 
Old 08-11-2019, 08:49 AM   #47
mats_b_tegner
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2009
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden
Distribution: Slackware64
Posts: 556

Rep: Reputation: 353Reputation: 353Reputation: 353Reputation: 353
I would say yes. I started with Slackware 7.0 way back in December 1999. Back then I only had dialup internet access so buying a CD set was essential. My current full installation was in 2009. It's a lot easier to use Slackware from version 13.0 onwards compared to versions 7.0 to 10.0.

Last edited by mats_b_tegner; 08-11-2019 at 08:51 AM.
 
Old 08-11-2019, 08:59 AM   #48
cwizardone
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Distribution: Slackware64-current with "True Multilib" & Xfce.
Posts: 4,821
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217Reputation: 2217
The first Slackware CD I purchased was dated March 1995.
Over the years I don't believe the installation procedure has changed, much, but a few things
have been made easier.
By version 13, we finally had automatic mounting of removable media. Long, long, long overdue!
Then xorg became easier, but I still do it the "old fashion way."
There are probably several other things that have "improved" over the years, but the only other item that comes to mind is NetworkManager. Oh, and PulseAudio. Some people like them, some don't. They both "just work." No fuss, no muss.
YMMV.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	slackware1995-8x6.jpg
Views:	40
Size:	142.5 KB
ID:	31098  

Last edited by cwizardone; 08-11-2019 at 10:03 AM. Reason: Typo.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-11-2019, 10:09 AM   #49
ehartman
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Delft, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 830

Rep: Reputation: 406Reputation: 406Reputation: 406Reputation: 406Reputation: 406
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwizardone View Post
The first Slackware CD I purchased was dated March 1995.
At that time I didn't have a CD-rom drive (486dx2, dual drive floppy (5.25 and 3.5") and 540 MB disk with NO room for expansion and NO USB or so yet for external drives), so up to and including Slackware 4.0 I downloaded the separate floppy contents (at work!).
BTW: that 486 was my "machine at work" at the time, at home I still had "only" a 286.
Several years later I bought my first Pentium (/60) which did have a CD-rom drive (sbpcd interface) and installed Slackware 7.1 on it (image downloaded and burned on another machine at work).
I still got the complete (and updated) 4.0 tree and the 7.x iso images.
 
Old 08-11-2019, 10:33 AM   #50
hazel
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2016
Location: Harrow, UK
Distribution: LFS, AntiX, Slackware
Posts: 3,185
Blog Entries: 9

Rep: Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706Reputation: 1706
When I first started using Linux in 2004 or thereabouts, I was told that Slackware was the only Linux you installed from floppies.
 
Old 08-11-2019, 11:27 AM   #51
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys for decades while testing others to keep up
Posts: 2,323

Rep: Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337
Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
When I first started using Linux in 2004 or thereabouts, I was told that Slackware was the only Linux you installed from floppies.
Hello hazel,

Interesting!... though a bit confusing since even OS/2 Warp 3 circa 1994, though still possible to install from some ~30 floppies, was preferred to be installed via 3 floppies that could be easily altered for variables and then it asked for the CD if one chose the CD version boot disks. By 1996 when OS/2 Warp 4 was released, it received considerable flack for not having a CD-only installer with no floppies required. IBM apparently preferred the flexibility of having an easily alterable environment and never officially released a CD-Only install. eComStation took over OS/2 and the first thing they did was go CD-Only in 2001. By 1998 it was really all about Opticals, at least here in the US..

In 2004, Slackware had released v10, a very solid release btw (I kept a 10.2 machine running up until v13 was released), and though floppy images were available, I certainly didn't use them by that late date. Right around that time/version the initial array of needed installer kernels would no longer fit on a single floppy, unless you chose one specifically for a hardware environment. By 2007, when v12 was released the array of specialized kernels was no longer needed when the "huge" kernels were released reflecting that extremely few PC OEMs even offered floppy drives anymore. On my end I still used floppies for deep level stuff but by 1999 I had sold even my Zip drive since it was obvious that Optical drives were going to be the winner for some time, although I did entertain the possibility of Magneto-Opticals for a time.

Just a few weeks ago I tossed out my last machine with a floppy drive in it, finally admitting to myself I hadn't used a single floppy in a decade. Now what do I do with some 1000 3.5 inch disks?

I knew people from other distros consider Slackware .... ummm... "quaint" but it ain't. I didn't know it was considered an antiquity.
 
Old 08-11-2019, 01:54 PM   #52
ehartman
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Delft, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 830

Rep: Reputation: 406Reputation: 406Reputation: 406Reputation: 406Reputation: 406
Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
In 2004, Slackware had released v10, a very solid release btw (I kept a 10.2 machine running up until v13 was released)
My old (year 2000) Dell Pentium III system still is running Slackware 10.2 (it doesn't have the capabilities, especially RAM, to run newer releases and it's not connected to the internet anyway).
 
Old 08-11-2019, 02:16 PM   #53
ehartman
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Delft, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 830

Rep: Reputation: 406Reputation: 406Reputation: 406Reputation: 406Reputation: 406
Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
When I first started using Linux in 2004 or thereabouts, I was told that Slackware was the only Linux you installed from floppies.
No, version 10 (released in 2004) wasn't installable (although it WAS bootable from a 3.5" floppy) from pure floppies anymore. Somewhere between 7.1 and 8.0 the change was made to not split every category into separate floppy-sized directories:
Code:
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   10240 2001-06-28 10:03:48 a1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    6144 2001-06-20 20:53:24 ap1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    6144 2001-05-29 01:38:00 d1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    2048 2000-04-25 03:51:57 e1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    2048 2001-05-23 22:38:19 f1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   12288 2001-06-22 04:08:49 gtk1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    2048 2001-05-29 05:14:30 k1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    8192 2001-06-14 03:14:15 kde1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    8192 2001-06-24 21:59:24 n1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    2048 2001-02-11 09:20:54 t1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    2048 1999-06-28 02:11:33 tcl1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    4096 2001-06-14 03:21:18 x1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    4096 2001-05-03 04:44:25 xap1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    2048 2001-04-23 05:23:21 xv1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    2048 1999-09-29 22:29:34 y1
(from the 8.0 iso)
Later the "1" (for "first floppy") was dropped.

Slackware 7.1 still had separate directories for each floppy:
Code:
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   4096 2000-06-21 20:50:59 a1
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:11 a10
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:11 a11
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:12 a12
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:12 a13
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:12 a14
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:43 a15
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:13 a16
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:01 a2
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:03 a3
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:04 a4
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:06 a5
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:07 a6
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:08 a7
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:09 a8
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root   2048 2000-06-21 20:51:10 a9
for the "a" and "n" set only, so you could get the network up and download the rest of the packages.

PS: 7.1 was released in 2000, 8.0 in 2001, they were the last ones releases to use the old package names (without version numbers).

Last edited by ehartman; 08-11-2019 at 02:20 PM.
 
Old 08-11-2019, 04:55 PM   #54
TheRealGrogan
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
Distribution: Slackware, Manjaro (for gaming)
Posts: 106

Rep: Reputation: 94
I find Slackware to be the easiest distribution there is, because it doesn't get in the way of old school users. I have much more difficulty with so called "easy" distributions because I have to circumvent so much crap :-)

(for example, you wouldn't recognize my Manjaro setup with all the work I've done to it)
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-11-2019, 05:21 PM   #55
goumba
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: New Jersey, USA
Distribution: Current: Debian and OpenSUSE. Past: Arch, RedHat (pre-RHEL). FreeBSD & OpenBSD novice, Hackintosh
Posts: 1,190
Blog Entries: 7

Rep: Reputation: 335Reputation: 335Reputation: 335Reputation: 335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysander666 View Post
I would love to see an example of an old /etc/rc.d/rc.module and xorg.conf file so that I can appreciated that I don't have to edit them. Though that depends on how involved they were, commenting out the odd line doesn't sound too hard.
Not too crazy, but a typical config for an ATI card with a CRT:
https://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/html_sing...-HOWTO/#AEN240

If you feel like putting your reading hat on:
https://xfree86.org/current/XF86Config.5.html
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-11-2019, 07:31 PM   #56
andrew.46
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,025

Rep: Reputation: 256Reputation: 256Reputation: 256
Unlike most of the more experienced Slackware users here in 2003 I would have still been with Windows (whichever version was out then) with Ubuntu Breezy Badger coming to me in 2005. But it is very interesting to hear the old stories
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-12-2019, 04:14 PM   #57
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys for decades while testing others to keep up
Posts: 2,323

Rep: Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337
Quote:
Originally Posted by ehartman View Post
My old (year 2000) Dell Pentium III system still is running Slackware 10.2 (it doesn't have the capabilities, especially RAM, to run newer releases and it's not connected to the internet anyway).
Just FTR until about 2 years ago I had an ancient Sony Vaio PII 433MHz laptop maxed out at 512MB RAM running Slackware 13.37. It was agonizingly slow to boot but once up it was slow, but not at all painful since the greatest bottleneck then is network bandwidth and graphics settings. If your box isn't involved in internet, then, if configured right, 512MB is not a huge handicap for OpSys version. Only how fast your graphics can paint a page might be, but the most RAM intensive work will be similar on 10.2 compared to most newer releases. The version footprint is very similar, almost identical or can be configured so.
 
Old 08-13-2019, 10:04 AM   #58
pchristy
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2012
Location: UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 422

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I can't recall how long I've been using Slackware now, but I think it was around the time Slackware-8.0 was released. I had been using OS/2 Warp quite happily, but when support for that was dropped, I decided to try something else. There was a Red Hat release on a magazine disk, so I tried it and got absolutely nowhere with it! Then I found a cover disk with VectorLinux (based on Slackware), and found that very easy to live with compared to Red Hat. After a year or so on Vector, I decided to stop messing round with a clone, and try the real thing. Never had a problem, and never looked back.

Occasionally I will install Mageia for a family member or friend who is not computer literate. It is easy to live with if you are just a simple user, but if you have a problem or want a specific piece of software that isn't in their repository, it can be a pig! And I don't know if its just me, but I have never managed to successfully install any of the 'buntus! Slackware, no problem! 'buntu, fail every time!

So no, I don't think Slackware has become easier to install, because I've never had a problem installing it in the first place!

;-)

--
Pete
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-13-2019, 11:47 AM   #59
enorbet
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2003
Location: Virginia
Distribution: Slackware = Main OpSys for decades while testing others to keep up
Posts: 2,323

Rep: Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337Reputation: 2337
I find that installation of any opsys is quite routine if one plans and creates partitions ahead of time and labels them. Not every opsys or distro displays partition labels (Slack doesn't unless you run cfdisk) but it helps on some though just knowing exactly what partition to install to and then which will get the bootloader avoids many, many pitfalls. Slackware's installer for me is just the best.

@pchristy - Wow! another OS/2 geek! Hiya!Were you a fan of Clear and Simple? and did you ever do emx runtimes and install Enlightenment on Warp?

Last edited by enorbet; 08-13-2019 at 11:49 AM.
 
Old 08-13-2019, 12:22 PM   #60
folkenfanel
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: formerly Fanelia and Zaibach
Distribution: Slackware-current !
Posts: 312

Rep: Reputation: 38
Talking Erm, it is certainly just a little different

There were SlackBuilds those days (that's how Slackware packages are built anyway), there wasn't slackbuilds.org as it is these days.

Hardware is easier to set up and running now.

Other than that there is not much difference. Memory footprint is larger but again, the kernel is larger these days.

So it's neither noticeably easier, nor noticeably harder to use. Maybe harder to maintain in some parts (Firefox for instance with its mania of reinventing the wheel every 3 releases, GTK+3 the same breaking compatibility with theming and changing the API every couple months, things like that. Not really Slackware's fault, but upstream). I think that's why Patrick removed GNOME.

These days I'm mostly using Tor Browser for everyday browsing, not because it's inherently more "secure", but because it's more stable (read, the UI tends to look the same without wild redesigns), than Firefox.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to find a file that's modified more than 2 days ago but less than 5 days BudiKusasi Linux - Newbie 1 02-09-2018 07:25 PM
UNIX user years ago. Now leaving microsludge XP for Zorin OS 6. rstithb LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro 3 04-20-2014 05:46 AM
LXer: AMD Gallium3D Performance Is Much Better Than Two Years Ago LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 08-28-2013 04:21 PM
Dial-up on RH9: worked two years ago alar Linux - Networking 2 04-30-2005 05:01 PM
Today's newbies to Linux vs. Five years ago (say) vharishankar General 40 03-23-2005 12:42 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:51 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration