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Old 06-04-2021, 11:04 AM   #16
enorbet
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Good catch enine! While there is some overlap in usage between servos and steppers, I was overly generalizing... especially considering the follow up video of Empire Marching, stepper is much more accurate as well as appropriate
 
Old 06-04-2021, 11:18 AM   #17
enine
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Speaking of floppies, I used to have an 8" one in my desk at work. Any time someone would come over asking for something, report, etc I'd hand it to them. Everyone learned to specify 'email that report to me'
 
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Old 06-04-2021, 11:41 AM   #18
chrisretusn
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This thread definitely bring back memories for me. My first install of Slackware was from floppies. I was in seventh heaven when I got my first Slackware CD set from Hobbes I still have those CD's. I was also in to OS/2 back in those days.
 
Old 06-04-2021, 11:50 AM   #19
enine
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I had the CD but I don't recall now why I had to install from floppies. I seem to recall using a tool (rawwrite?) from the CD to write the first boot floppy then booting my other system from it. Maybe I just didn't want to move my cd-rom drive ower, can't recall anymore. It was the walnut creek cdrom if i remember
 
Old 06-04-2021, 07:01 PM   #20
enorbet
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OS/2 2.1 was all floppy. IIRC Warp 3 came with ~24 floppies and a CD but the CD was never bootable (unless modded) . The idea was, since writable CDs were extremely new and expensive then and rewritables were a pipe dream, 3 or 4 floppies to boot basics and load specific drivers and allow easy modifications to the boot and driver process and availability and then load the fixed CD stuff. Warp 4 came with just a few floppies and a CD as did WSeB. eComstation finally introduced bootable CDs and a bunch of new drivers.

I was actually low level TeamOS2 but soon began to disavow that when actual death threats began to fly between MS and IBM. Running an Enlightenment DE in place of the sterile Presentation Manager was what got me introduced to and interested in Linux.
 
Old 06-05-2021, 04:37 AM   #21
gp.d
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In 1997 I bought a Linux book and a CD-Rom was included, and on that CD there where image files of Slackware floppies (can't remember how many
because I don't have that CD anymore), the dos-program "rawrite.exe", so you could write the needed floppies under dos.
I remember differnt boot-floppies with ide or scsi drivers, and after booting with that 1st floppy one had to go on with the "root" floppy.
Can't remember the version, but it was my first slackware install
How time passes by...
 
Old 06-05-2021, 06:11 AM   #22
schmatzler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
Do you have a link for his OS/2 efforts?
Yes, they are here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xeaRlhz96mI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8uwGTHZzzF4

Be aware that they're almost 14 hours combined, though. :P
 
Old 06-05-2021, 08:48 AM   #23
schmatzler
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Just a quick reminder: The stream will go live in 10 minutes.

See you all over at YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6GRLhVXYMk
 
Old 06-05-2021, 10:24 AM   #24
chrisretusn
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Man does that remind me of my first time installing Slackware, forgot how it actually went, especially the decisions you had to make. I also installed Debian the same way back in those days. What's left out is downloading on a slow (I think 1200, maybe 300) baud modem (couldn't do it in one day) and creating all of those disk.
 
Old 06-06-2021, 02:16 PM   #25
enorbet
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Thanks. That guy runs a slow show but it wasn't as slow as I expected and I found it quite interesting for several reasons. I was pretty impressed with his usage of VMs since I have avoided those since they don't ideally suit what I mostly do, requiring hardware acceleration. It was also fascinating how he hacks (in the original sense of that word) to workaround obstacles and repurpose things. I was quite surprised to see Linux on CGA and impressed he actually got XFree86-3 running with little effort. Very sharp guy who is like the definition of "Familiarity breeds contempt" - Deep knowledge. Hard won experience.

Additionally while I imagine Patrick would cringe from being the creator and therefore knowing every littler thing that gave him fits, I am actually impressed. As tiny and simple as Slackware 1.1 was it is impressive how much it actually could do and how clean it was.

Last edited by enorbet; 06-06-2021 at 02:18 PM.
 
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Old 06-06-2021, 05:27 PM   #26
rkelsen
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^ That was X386, wasn't it? I'm sure he said it wasn't XFree86.

Last edited by rkelsen; 06-06-2021 at 05:29 PM.
 
Old 06-06-2021, 05:32 PM   #27
slackerDude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
OS/2 2.1 was all floppy. IIRC Warp 3 came with ~24 floppies and a CD but the CD was never bootable (unless modded) . The idea was, since writable CDs were extremely new and expensive then and rewritables were a pipe dream, 3 or 4 floppies to boot basics and load specific drivers and allow easy modifications to the boot and driver process and availability and then load the fixed CD stuff. Warp 4 came with just a few floppies and a CD as did WSeB. eComstation finally introduced bootable CDs and a bunch of new drivers.

I was actually low level TeamOS2 but soon began to disavow that when actual death threats began to fly between MS and IBM. Running an Enlightenment DE in place of the sterile Presentation Manager was what got me introduced to and interested in Linux.

Hmm. IIRC, IBM came to UWaterloo during the OS/2 Warp beta days and was giving out either free install CDs or DVDs. No floppy needed, as I recall. Ran it for a while, even bought it, but had to give it up due to instability. I heard later that fixpack 21 (like 2-3 years after initial release) was rock solid, but I gave up after fixpack 4 or 5 and just ran Slackware as my daily. Still doing that (with a few breaks to try the original Red Had 7.3 back in ~2000, etc), but I've been mostly Slackware as my daily for ~25 years. At this point, I can't imagine NOT running Slackware..
 
Old 06-06-2021, 07:27 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enorbet View Post
I was pretty impressed with his usage of VMs since I have avoided those since they don't ideally suit what I mostly do, requiring hardware acceleration.
enorbet, as a tinkerer, I've never understood your reluctance to use VMs. If there was ever a case for VMs, this is it. Installing an old OS on physical hardware from 55 physical floppies, rather than images, would most likely have been a lot more painful.

There is also significantly less risk of data loss with VMs. You can "sandbox" a VM, so that anything it does cannot affect the host OS. And you don't need to reboot every time you want to switch OS as you do with a dual/multi boot setup.

Also, hardware acceleration is not required for everything. 99% of the time, I'm sure you could get by without it. With that said, using VMs doesn't preclude you from having your hardware acceleration... per this section of the VirtualBox instructions: https://docs.oracle.com/en/virtualiz...add-video.html
 
Old 06-06-2021, 09:18 PM   #29
enorbet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slackerDude View Post
Hmm. IIRC, IBM came to UWaterloo during the OS/2 Warp beta days and was giving out either free install CDs or DVDs. No floppy needed, as I recall. Ran it for a while, even bought it, but had to give it up due to instability. I heard later that fixpack 21 (like 2-3 years after initial release) was rock solid, but I gave up after fixpack 4 or 5 and just ran Slackware as my daily. Still doing that (with a few breaks to try the original Red Had 7.3 back in ~2000, etc), but I've been mostly Slackware as my daily for ~25 years. At this point, I can't imagine NOT running Slackware..
I don't know what to make of that since one major problem for OS/2 only moderately fixed in Warp 4 was CDROM drivers and the only way to workaround that was to jump through hoops altering the floppies for the correct CDROM driver. I don't see how IBM could have made a bootable CDROM when there were so many unsupported drives. I never saw a bootable OS/2 CDROM until eComStation. DVDs didn't exist when Warp 3 was released. I never had stability issues with any version of OS/2. I setup and maintained a ~200 workstation OS/2 2.1 LAN that never had a single unscheduled reboot in over 2 years. With Warp 3 I was no longer doing custom systems and mainly used it for a SOHO Desktop. It was a nice step up but Warp 4 was the big upgrade. It was incredible. I can't recall exactly when but quite early on I bought the "Clear and Simple" tool kit. I LOVED their File manager but my initial reason for plunking down cash was it's system analyzer, hugely valuable with ~100 line config.sys. That may be part of my experience being extremely stable.

Warp 4 introduced me to Linux and knowing nothing I took a recommendation to go with Mandrake but a system upgrade hosed the whole system. I asked the guys I respected most on IRC what they used and why and was told "Slackware...it just compiles stuff right".. Like you it's been my Main ever since. Just for fun I did install Warp 4.5 (WSeB) on a 64 bit system just to see if I could and how fast it would be but I haven't even booted it in over 7 years.

Last edited by enorbet; 06-06-2021 at 09:39 PM.
 
Old 06-06-2021, 09:28 PM   #30
enorbet
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Well rkelsen, since I've been a multibooter since 1992 I suppose hardware acceleration may have become a convenient excuse since I could always just boot to a system that would run DAWs, Games, and videos properly. The deeper reason was likely that I tried VMWare in the late '90s and hated it. I figured if I really was motivated to run some other system, I'd just install it for real.

This is why until now I have been resistant to VMs but that was kind of the point of my comment. The video impressed me so now I do have at least some interest.

Oh and as for 1.1 X, I may have misunderstood him. He could have been saying "Three" instead of "Free" but when he mentioned it "had a three in it" I assumed it was a tag on XFree to designate for 386. I didn't start messing with Linux until 1998 when it was Xfree86 and started with Mandrake 'cuz "It's optimized for 586". In just a few months I moved on to Slackware and it was very soon I knew I was Home.

Last edited by enorbet; 06-06-2021 at 09:33 PM.
 
  


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