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Old 06-01-2018, 08:54 PM   #16
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EldonCool View Post
---------------------------------
Doing all this, a program was added --> /usr/bin/dosbox
Also I guess a bunch of other stuff might
have been added that might be needed by
the program.
--------------------------------
Very good.

If you're interested in a way to automate the whole procedure, there's a utility called sbopkg:

https://sbopkg.org/

You can browse the repository, queue up your chosen builds and have them automatically downloaded, built and installed.
 
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Old 06-03-2018, 01:47 PM   #17
EldonCool
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The whole problem I had was this:

Back when I described my problem I said:
Quote:
I got it installed, but something about it puzzles me.
I can run it and it appears to work, however it is
installed in this place:

/tmp/SBo/package-dosbox/usr/bin/dosbox
The program dosbox was the last item
above. My thoughts were that all this
stuff I did was to install the entire
package of dosbox. It did appear to
install everything, lots of files
installed in tmp. One of them was
the actual program dosbox.


But the package was not installed yet.
Only an intermediate step had been done
to install the entire package.

Now add to that the instructions for the
installation on slackbuilds.org said this:
Quote:
the finished package should be in the directory
declared as "OUTPUT" in the SlackBuild script
(this defaults to the /tmp directory).
Use installpkg to install it; you'll probably
want to move it to some other location for
safekeeping after it's installed.
Those instructions to my way of thinking
are wrong. First the "finished package"
had not been installed, because to my thinking
a package is a program plus all the supporting
files and directories that are needed.

To this day, I am not sure what a package is.
My intuitive thinking about a package is that
it is the thing that is finally a working
system installed on the computer.
But it might not be. It might be thought
of as the file that contains all that stuff
that makes that working system, which would
be a tgz type file.

The person who wrote those instructions was referring
to a file, that file was:

dosbox-0.74-i586-2_SBo.tgz

The ambiguous point that made the instructions
ambiguous was that a package could be thought
of as a complete installed system, or the file
that contained the building blocks to make the
finished product, a package.

So the instructions on slackblds.org was to
install IT referring to IT as a package,
and install IT using installpkg:

So my thougts reading those instructions:
They were telling me to install the package
with installpkg. If the package was on
my computer already, why would I have to
install it?

Yet they told me the package was there
already in /tmp, and to also install IT.

They were actually thinking of the file that
was there to build the package. So they said
use installpkg to install IT.

Had the instructions said, something like:
Quote:
A tgz file will be built that is put into
the /tmp directory. Find this tgz file and
install it with installpkg.
That piece of knowledge was absolutely crucial
to be able to know how to do it. Yet the
instructions gave no comment this way at all.
The instructions assumed the user would know
that this intermediate file was built there
for that final step.

Bad instructions in the computer world is the
norm, not the exception. The reason is always
that the one giving the instructions does not
start at the beginning point. They always
start at a point that comes pretty close to the
beginning, and assume you know what came before
where their instructions begin.

Another thing that would have been nice to know
was what was added by rkelsen, about sbopkg. That
gives light to why a directory SBo is built
there in /tmp. It is all an intermediate part
of building the package, not the final package
installation.

Actually I believe my intuitive definition of a
package is just as good or better than calling
the package a tgz file. The reason I believe this
is because Slack instructions for various things
on packages include the following:

Quote:
removepkg

In it's simplest form, removepkg will remove the package
name you specify. The general syntax is removepkg
packagename. There are a few command line options that
you can specify:
And this:

Quote:
Slackware's packaging system uses ordinary compressed tar files.
The system allows you to keep track of the packages you install,
making it easy to upgrade or remove them down the road.

Slackware provides an interactive program for managing your
packages. You can use pkgtool to handle adding and removing
packages from your system.

So looking at things like this, you can get
the idea that a package is working system
but you can also get the idea a package is
a file (tgz type) containing things needed to make
the working system. I am not sure which is
correct, and I suspect slackware is not sure
either, but as long as you understand that
the very word package is ambiguous it
will keep you out of trouble.

I never understood that. Anyway it was a good
learning experience.

Last edited by EldonCool; 06-03-2018 at 01:51 PM.
 
Old 06-03-2018, 02:59 PM   #18
Alien Bob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EldonCool View Post
To this day, I am not sure what a package is.
That post was too long to even attempt to read it, let alone get past the horrible formatting.

In post #13 I asked you to read this article: https://docs.slackware.com/slackware...ement_hands_on
I assume you never read it, or other articles in the Wiki.
You lack fundamental basic knowledge. Every Linux distro knows the concept of "packages". It's time that you stop sittong on your hands and start researching to fill in the gaps.
 
Old 06-04-2018, 10:12 AM   #19
EldonCool
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Quote:
You lack fundamental basic knowledge. Every Linux distro knows the concept of "packages". It's time that you stop sittong on your hands and start researching to fill in the gaps.
Well for sure I lack basic knowledge. I have only
been using slack since about version 2. Maybe
another 25 years and I will have basic knowledge.

Your recommendation to read was spot on, however
I found my problem before getting to read it.
That would have been a great read the first day
I ever came across a package, however that never
happened. Then a number of years, even decades
went past. Finally after my first encounter
with packages (installing them on first installation)
the definition finally revealed. Better late than
never, I suppose.
 
Old 06-04-2018, 10:39 AM   #20
Richard Cranium
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Location: Carrollton, Texas
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How did you install Slackware in the first place without running across the idea of a package?


Quote:
So looking at things like this, you can get the idea that a package is working system but you can also get the idea a package is a file (tgz type) containing things needed to make the working system. I am not sure which is correct, and I suspect slackware is not sure either, but as long as you understand that the very word package is ambiguous it will keep you out of trouble.
A software package is a collection of files which provide some functionality. That is normally a single program or a suite of related programs along with anything else uniquely needed by that program to operate. A package is installed by a package manager, which maintains a database of the packages you've installed. That database is used to manage updates and deletions of packages as well as a way to find out what you've installed.

Slackware's package database is found in /var/log/packages. Those files are human-readable.

While all Slackware packages are tgz/txz files, not all tgz/txz files are Slackware packages.
 
Old 06-04-2018, 12:37 PM   #21
Alien Bob
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EldonCool View Post
Well for sure I lack basic knowledge. I have only
been using slack since about version 2. Maybe
another 25 years and I will have basic knowledge.
I am profoundly sorry but the levels of knowledge you display in this forum are not matching your 24 years of experience in using Slackware. I wonder how you managed for so long. No sarcasm intended, just plain disbelief.
 
Old 06-05-2018, 02:30 PM   #22
EldonCool
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien Bob View Post
I am profoundly sorry but the levels of knowledge you display in this forum are not matching your 24 years of experience in using Slackware. I wonder how you managed for so long. No sarcasm intended, just plain disbelief.
Maybe I was just lucky. A little luck never hurts, right?
 
Old 06-05-2018, 02:34 PM   #23
EldonCool
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium View Post
How did you install Slackware in the first place without running across the idea of a package?
The easy answer, I did run across the idea
of a package. It was right there on my computer
screen. It said something like "Packages to
install", then there was this big list. So
I got the first idea there. My idea of a package
though was not yet clearly defined, just an idea
at that point.

Last edited by EldonCool; 06-05-2018 at 02:37 PM.
 
Old 06-05-2018, 04:52 PM   #24
EldonCool
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alien Bob View Post
I am profoundly sorry but the levels of knowledge you display in this forum are not matching your 24 years of experience in using Slackware. I wonder how you managed for so long. No sarcasm intended, just plain disbelief.
Maybe I can shed a little more light on the situation.
The first thing to consider is my age, 80, will be
81 in August. I retired at 65. A person tends to
forget a lot of computer based stuff over the years.
For example, I have programmed in over 20 languages
on many operating systems. In my last job before
I retired at 65, I was proficient in 4 languages on
3 different operating systems on that job alone.
One of those systems was Unix. On that job I was
the lead system analyst on the largest construction
project in the world. I even had linux on my home
computer back then.

Today, 15 years later, if I want to write a program
there is only 3 languages I can start off in without
looking things up.

Yes I been at it long enough to forget more than
what many know. That may be the problem, forgetting.
 
Old 06-06-2018, 09:07 PM   #25
FlinchX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EldonCool View Post
Okay, so I am suppose to install using installpkg

The instructions on slackbuilds really doesn't tell me how.
It says this:


OUTPUT in the script was --> "/tmp"

So somewhere in /tmp there is something I am
supposed to install with "installpkg".

Do they try their best to really keep it disguised
how to install when they write these instructions?

...

The writer of those instructions is either a sadistic
bastard or an idiot.
Instructions for SBo packages can't contain hints about installing Slackware packages, that would be redundant. SBo is an additional third party repository and if you are using it, you are supposed to know the basics of package management in vanilla Slackware. If you are a new Slackware user and are not familiar with the basics, this shall help http://slackbook.org/beta/ . Pay particular attention to this chapter http://slackbook.org/beta/#ch_pkg . As it was pointed above, if you will manually download SBo buildscripts (and required source code tarballs) and run them as root, they will produce Slackware packages in /tmp. For convenience, you could use a tool like https://sbopkg.org/ , which will transparently take care of almost everything: let you search the repository, automatically, download, build and install stuff. I said "almost" because you'll still need to take care of package dependencies. If you go with sbopkg, learn about sbopkg queues as well.
 
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