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Old 02-11-2019, 09:20 AM   #31
Petri Kaukasoina
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I wouldn't split 16 GB into separate partitions. Probably I wouldn't even make a swap partition, but instead I would use a swap file if/when needed.
 
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Old 02-11-2019, 09:24 AM   #32
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good point, does that have an SDCard reader? that is where I put a swap on my laptop. I split a 16GB in half and added it to swap in fstab, just to have one. just cuz.
 
Old 02-11-2019, 09:52 AM   #33
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The idea of not have separate partitions fills me with dread. I can't even remember what happens in such an instance, I suppose the OS just allocates things dynamically. The machine has 4GB of RAM, so having a swap partition is arguably unnecessary.
 
Old 02-11-2019, 11:05 AM   #34
Petri Kaukasoina
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If you only have the root partition, everything works until the disk is full. If you have separate partitions, one of them fills first and you are in trouble even though there could be plenty of free space in other partitions.
 
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Old 02-11-2019, 11:12 AM   #35
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you could also give a try, maybe not with what one usb port? I was going to suggest having a home on a usb stick that you can encrypt as well perhaps. Just have it plugged in when you boot so it mounts it using UUID.


on second thought, you can still set that up after you've installed Slack if you only have one usb port needing it to use for installing slack.

Last edited by BW-userx; 02-11-2019 at 11:14 AM.
 
Old 02-12-2019, 06:53 AM   #36
Lysander666
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petri Kaukasoina View Post
If you only have the root partition, everything works until the disk is full. If you have separate partitions, one of them fills first and you are in trouble even though there could be plenty of free space in other partitions.
Great idea about not partitioning. The more I think about it, the more it seems a good idea. And the swap file idea is good too.

Here's a small tutorial on how to create one in Slackware. Who is this Lysender guy, a distant relative? Unfortunately his tutorial isn't very good, "next, create the virtual disk". Erm, how? That's like my saying, "next, use fdisk to partition the drive". Not very specific.

Here are a couple more tutorials:

https://www.tecmint.com/create-a-linux-swap-file/
https://www.maketecheasier.com/create-swap-file-linux/

However, this tutorial says not to use a swap file with an SSD. Is this a point for concern? As I've noted, with 4GB RAM I may not need one and can always add one at a later date.
 
Old 02-12-2019, 07:26 AM   #37
kgha
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysander666 View Post
However, this tutorial says not to use a swap file with an SSD. Is this a point for concern? As I've noted, with 4GB RAM I may not need one and can always add one at a later date.
The more read/write cycles performed, the sooner your SSD will wear out. But as you say, with 4GB RAM your swap file (or swap partition) will probably not be activated very often, and maybe you won't even need one.

"Proper" SSDs have generally been viewed as more durable/longlived than eMMC storage (which might be what's in your chromebook). Partly because SSDs spread r/w operations over all the chips which makes them faster and also, presumably, distributes the wear and tear of the chips more evenly.

I shouldn't be too worried about this. I used my old eee900 daily for over five years, and even if it has gone into retirement now, it still runs. Not particularly fast, but that can be put down to the lousy Celeron 900MHz processor and 1GB 400MHz RAM.

Last edited by kgha; 02-12-2019 at 07:35 AM.
 
Old 02-12-2019, 07:58 AM   #38
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if anything you can keep in mind not to use up all of your space, and just write a script to create a swap file on the fly and turn it on and off delete it too if not needed. keep it in /usr/local/bin so all you have to do is pass a var of size (and have a default size) and it does the rest for you. Then run it on a as needed basis.

I got slack current 8GB RAM and I usually have 5 ~ 6 GBs always available, Blender is the only thing that sucks up the RAM from everything I run on this laptop. So 4GB ram for a only use it to surf web, write emails light duty stuff laptop, you should not even see a need for a swap.

Last edited by BW-userx; 02-12-2019 at 08:09 AM.
 
Old 02-12-2019, 01:23 PM   #39
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A bit of warning about eMMC, after some discussions with a friend of mine who works at an Android tablets factory.

Apparently the eMMC are some kind of chips soldered on-board, which essentially are fast SD-CARDs, and they are (un)reliable just like them.

Then, they are not so reliable, certainly much less reliable than the SSDs and the operating systems made to be put in eMMC have special measures to minimize the writes to devices.

He said also that the idea to put a swap partition on an eMMC is simply nuts. Contrary, he recommends that anything temporary to be put in tmpfs devices, e.g. /tmp

Last edited by ZhaoLin1457; 02-12-2019 at 01:26 PM.
 
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Old 02-13-2019, 04:20 AM   #40
kgha
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ZhaoLin1457 is of course absolutely right when pointing out that eMMC storage is less reliable (and may ahve a shorter lifespan) than a "proper" SSD or a spinning HDD.
Still, many laptops/netbooks/chromebooks in the lower price range are equipped with eMMC storage (e.g. most Acer, Asus, Lenovo with up to 64 GB storage) and it's not that they break down that often. And my 10 year old eee900 (with eMMC) still works OK.
My advice to Lysander666 is not to worry. But yes, hardware might break (just as a kernel upgrade might break your system), so backups of important stuff is vital (as always), and the chromebook is probably not the best host for a server running 24/7 should anyone get the idea...
 
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Old 02-13-2019, 05:15 PM   #41
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Thanks to everyone and yes, this is eMMC. So I have the thing up and running and there are pros and cons. The most interesting thing is ChromeOS which I find pretty scary, it's so locked down. I know it's a 'Chromebook' but everything is very Google-centrified, more than I expected, it forces you to use the Google appstore to get things and only use Chrome browser, as well as Youtube, Gmail and Google Docs. In short, it'd a perfect machine for people who want to 'get things done' and have absolutely no choice whatsoever about how. It promotes little thought or options. No right click either - everything is done through the trackpad which uses tap to click and no buttons. Still, I'm not being ungrateful since it was given to me, but I do find the lack of options open to the user to be rather worrying as a general point.

On the upside it's quite a nice machine with a nice screen, it's light, it looks sleek and ChromeOS does start up and shutdown awfully quickly. It's also pretty much silent in operation. I wish it wouldn't nag me to update though, that's one thing I really don't miss in OSs. So it will be an interesting project over the next few days to get ChromeOS off this machine and get Slackware on. It's even too much of a fiddle to get a command like 'pwd' in the shell to do anything, let alone install anything like neofetch. I think the sooner this is off it the better.

One useful piece of information I did manage to get out of it was this:

Code:
crosh> uname -s -r -m -o
Linux 4.4.164-15540-g24e68579fc36 x86_64 GNU/Linux
So it's using a very similar kernel version to Slackware stable.

Last edited by Lysander666; 02-13-2019 at 05:24 PM.
 
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Old 02-14-2019, 04:40 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lysander666 View Post
On the upside it's quite a nice machine with a nice screen, it's light, it looks sleek and ChromeOS does start up and shutdown awfully quickly. It's also pretty much silent in operation.
I'm following your experiments with interest for exactly the reasons above.

Have you looked at the Crouton project? And Google's own Crostini? Chroots that run either a whole OS or selected applications.

If anyone else wants to see what ChromeOS looks like without getting a chromebook, neverwear.com do CloudReady which is a version of ChromeOS that you can install on a recycled x86 laptop. It is designed for use in schools and endpoints in stores and so on but there is a 'home edition'. They flog remote support software and services to commercial customers. I can never get suspend to work even on laptops on their supported list.

And you will quickly realise how locked down the OS is, and come running back to Slack!

Last edited by keithpeter; 02-14-2019 at 04:42 AM. Reason: clarify
 
Old 02-14-2019, 07:58 AM   #43
Lysander666
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I've had a look at Crouton and Crostini and they're not really what I'm looking for - the idyll is to completely erase ChomeOS and this is apparently rather risky unless one really knows what one is doing - and I don't. Not at this point anyway.

Another snag is that when Toshiba say there's 16GB of space on the hard drive - they don't mean 16GB is available to the user - they mean, "the total size is 16GB but 6.5GB of those are taken up by ChromeOS". This leaves ordinary users like muggins here with actually about 9.5GB of usable space for a Slackware install.

Bearing these two points in mind, I'm thinking that the only way forward, not without a lot more research and experimentation anyway, is to install Slackware over what remains of the hard drive and run /home off an SSD.
 
Old 02-14-2019, 09:21 AM   #44
kgha
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Since there's a straightforward process for recovering ChromeOS:
https://support.google.com/chromeboo.../1080595?hl=en (see bottom of page for recovery with the help of a Linux pooter)
I would personally take the plunge and wipe all the 16GB rather than fiddle with an install on <10 GB disk space.
 
Old 02-14-2019, 09:30 AM   #45
Lysander666
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kgha View Post
Since there's a straightforward process for recovering ChromeOS:
https://support.google.com/chromeboo.../1080595?hl=en (see bottom of page for recovery with the help of a Linux pooter)
I would personally take the plunge and wipe all the 16GB rather than fiddle with an install on <10 GB disk space.
Are you saying it's possible to just wipe the ChromeOS partition[s] in fdisk?
 
  


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