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Old 04-11-2008, 07:14 AM   #1
stu_mueller
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increasing disk space


I have a single hard drive

/dev/hda1 is 13Gb windows NTFS
/dev/hda2 is 1Gb swap
/dev/hda3 is 13Gb / EXT3 (or it may be EXT2)

I want to delete my windows partition as I only have about 5Gb left of my 13Gb, doesn't seem like a lot, and add hte space to my root partition.

What is the best way of doing it, obvoiusly I could mount /dev/hda1 some where like /home but would that give me the best use of space? what is the best method of increasing /dev/hda3 to be 26Gb.

I have used GParted in the past on windows machines, would this work for me in this case?

Also is there a tool to see which directories are using hte most space, something like spacemonger.exe for windows?

The kde diskmanager shows the overall space on /dev/hda3 but not the sub folders.

Thanks

Stuart
 
Old 04-11-2008, 09:15 AM   #2
Rupa
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*) delete hda1 and hda2 and recreate it vice versa (first swap, second 13GB ext2)
*) copy your system to hda2, change /etc/fstab and /etc/lilo.conf (hda3 -> hda2)
*) reboot
*) delete hda3 and and grow hda2
 
Old 04-11-2008, 12:43 PM   #3
BCarey
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Gparted would work fine. Personally I'd make the new partition /home instead of just expanding the root partition, but that's just me. (If you do that, you can just use fdisk).

Brian
 
Old 04-11-2008, 04:18 PM   #4
stu_mueller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCarey View Post
Gparted would work fine. Personally I'd make the new partition /home instead of just expanding the root partition, but that's just me. (If you do that, you can just use fdisk).

Brian
Thats what I thought about doing, but that then only gives me 13Gb for anything under /home, and 13Gb for the rest of my system, rather than 26Gb for my system in total. So I am limiting the extra space to /home rather than allowing my other areas to write to it.

Being a newbie, that seems like a bit of a limited way. I admit, it is certainly easier, but I can just see me filling all this space up under say /usr and having a load of spare space under /home that is unusable by the rest of my system. And being on a laptop means I can't add drives very easily.

However, not having the experience it may be that /usr is not used very much but my /home will be used alot? is that generaly the case with Linux?
 
Old 04-11-2008, 06:14 PM   #5
tommcd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stu_mueller View Post
Being a newbie, that seems like a bit of a limited way. I admit, it is certainly easier, but I can just see me filling all this space up under say /usr and having a load of spare space under /home that is unusable by the rest of my system. And being on a laptop means I can't add drives very easily.

However, not having the experience it may be that /usr is not used very much but my /home will be used alot? is that generaly the case with Linux?
Having 13GB for /root is probably a bit much given your small hard drive. Having a separate /home is good since all your data will be stored in /home and if you reinstall Slack your data will remain safe since it is on a separate partition. /usr if where most of your programs go, so unless you have a really lot of software on your system it probably won't fill up as fast as /home.
To see how much space each directory is using, run as root <du -csh /*> (without the <>). See man du for details.

Last edited by tommcd; 04-11-2008 at 06:16 PM.
 
Old 04-11-2008, 06:46 PM   #6
BCarey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stu_mueller View Post
Thats what I thought about doing, but that then only gives me 13Gb for anything under /home, and 13Gb for the rest of my system, rather than 26Gb for my system in total. So I am limiting the extra space to /home rather than allowing my other areas to write to it.

Being a newbie, that seems like a bit of a limited way. I admit, it is certainly easier, but I can just see me filling all this space up under say /usr and having a load of spare space under /home that is unusable by the rest of my system. And being on a laptop means I can't add drives very easily.

However, not having the experience it may be that /usr is not used very much but my /home will be used alot? is that generaly the case with Linux?
You can always resize your partitions later if/when size becomes an issue.

Brian
 
Old 04-12-2008, 02:45 AM   #7
shadowsnipes
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/home will fill up fast especially if you download isos, compile software, store lots of packages, etc. If you are going to keep them separated then splitting them evenly for your size hard drive isn't that bad of an idea. 13-15GB is a reasonable size for /root if you don't want it fairly full all the time or want to install lots of software.

Depending on your machine you might be able to drop your swap down. If you have a lot of ram (1GB+) then you can probably safely have only 512MB for swap. Do you even use swap, and if so, what is your typical max usage?

Gparted should be able to handle whatever you decide for your linux partitions. I like the liveCD version.

For seeing big files du and/or find should do what you need. I recommend different switches for du, however, as the -cs just gives you a total for one directory. Using something like
Code:
du -h /path/to/directory | grep [0-9]M
for example, will list directories with some number of MB size.

The -size switch for find is probably more useful if used properly. Check near the end of the man page for an example.
 
  


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