LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-20-2016, 01:12 PM   #1
atelszewski
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 890

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
How Linux got to be Linux: Test driving 1993-2003 distros


Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by opensource.com
We begin our journey with Slackware 1.01, posted to the comp.os.linux.announce newsgroup well over 20 years ago.
How Linux got to be Linux: Test driving 1993-2003 distros.

--
Best regards,
Andrzej Telszewski
 
Old 12-20-2016, 01:36 PM   #2
dugan
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 8,895

Rep: Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808Reputation: 3808
Seth Kenlon is killing it!
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-20-2016, 02:15 PM   #3
ChuangTzu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2015
Location: Where ever needed
Distribution: Slackware/Salix while testing others
Posts: 1,324

Rep: Reputation: 1222Reputation: 1222Reputation: 1222Reputation: 1222Reputation: 1222Reputation: 1222Reputation: 1222Reputation: 1222Reputation: 1222
Quote:
Originally Posted by atelszewski View Post
Hi,



How Linux got to be Linux: Test driving 1993-2003 distros.

--
Best regards,
Andrzej Telszewski
Thank you for posting, that was quite some trip down memory lane!
 
Old 12-20-2016, 03:59 PM   #4
the3dfxdude
Member
 
Registered: May 2007
Posts: 566

Rep: Reputation: 245Reputation: 245Reputation: 245
Quote:
What's missing is any notion of package management. All installs and uninstalls are entirely manual, with no tracking.
So I pulled down sysadm.tgz, and in usr/bin/sysinstall, there is some semblance of package management, coming from SLS. I think he just doesn't recognize it never having used it really. Of course I didn't verify on a live system what this is. I'm not sure if there is a full copy of Slackware 1.0 out there to get a fully installed system, and how much needed to come from SLS disks. Slackware 1.1.2 definitely has some kind of pkgtools going. I definitely did not experience these times, any old timers want to comment?

I think nostalgia definitely requires to have been there to feel it. But I know he was just surveying the past.
 
Old 12-20-2016, 06:00 PM   #5
hitest
Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 5,780

Rep: Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909Reputation: 1909
Nice trip down memory lane! I'm relatively new to Linux. I started with Caldera Openlinux 2.3 in 2002. Caldera later morphed into the hated SCO. After that I used Red Hat 9 for a time. I started Slacking with 10.0 in 2004. I've been a Slacker ever since.
I'll always be a Slacker.
 
Old 12-21-2016, 07:17 AM   #6
bassmadrigal
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: West Jordan, UT, USA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 6,032

Rep: Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701Reputation: 3701
It's crazy to see how far Gnome has changed over these years. I had my first experiences with Linux back in college in the early 2000s. In that, we used Red Hat (started with 6.0 in one class and 7.0 for another). It piqued my interest, so I downloaded the latest Red Hat iso, 7.2 at the time, and tried installing it on my laptop. I was successful in installing it, but once booted up, I found it didn't recognize my cd drive and it had no drivers for my ethernet PCMCIA card (wireless was not very common back then -- my college didn't offer any wireless network and I didn't get my first 802.11b router for another year or two). I felt trapped because to get drivers for my network device, I needed to burn it to a disc (long before USB drives and I think the driver was too big for a floppy), but I wouldn't be able to open a disc on the laptop. Unfortunately, solving that went well beyond my current set of skills, so I just reinstalled Windows 2000 and just used Linux in the class. Once the Linux classes ended, Linux got shelved in the back of my mind. I remembered being particularly impressed with gedit, of all things, because if I navigated to an ftp directory for a website through the file manager, I could open an html file with gedit, make my changes, and save directly back to the ftp. At the time, I felt this was downright amazing instead of needing to edit the files locally and sync them to the server. I vaguely remember the desktop running Gnome, but it just seemed like a souped up Windows desktop with a lot of cool features.

Fast forward a few years and my buddy had been dabbling with many Linuxes, distro-hopping and collecting ISOs. He found Slackware and needed some help with it. I remembered some of my experiences from college and helped him through it. It piqued my interest again, so I tried installing it on a relatively recent laptop. I think this was around the 10.1 or 10.2 timeframe. It took a week of recompiling the kernel until I could get my IPW2200 wireless working (support wasn't included in the kernel by default, so I think I was patching and who knows what else... it's all a blur now). I was hooked.

However, over the years, with the way Gnome has changed, I started questioning whether I had actually used Gnome or KDE back in my Red Hat days. The Gnome I remembered using just felt so similar to the KDE I was using in Slackware... I started wondering if I remembered it wrong (but not enough to actually research it). Gnome was "progressing" into quite a different beast from the one I used back in the day, and when I installed it into Slackware (because I wanted gedit, not realizing other programs offered something similar), it just seemed so foreign and unintuitive. I couldn't get used to it, so I kept using the familiar and easy-to-use (for me) KDE 3.5. I continued using gedit for some time, so I was grateful for the projects offering Gnome for Slackware. Eventually, I found alternative tools that didn't require Gnome, so I haven't installed it in probably over a decade. It was kinda interesting to see the Gnome desktop from Red Hat 6.0 and get that reminiscent feeling of my early KDE days and realizing that back then, Gnome and KDE weren't nearly as different as they are today. Then you have to be amazed that both projects are still around, and not only around, but still extremely strong, both with large followings. Major props to all the devs involved in both projects!

Thanks for the link and the memories, Andrzej!
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 12-21-2016, 04:17 PM   #7
kikinovak
MLED Founder
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Montpezat (South France)
Distribution: CentOS, OpenSUSE
Posts: 3,384

Rep: Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985Reputation: 1985
Quote:
Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
It's crazy to see how far Gnome has changed over these years.
It's also crazy to see how WindowMaker has not changed over the years. I'm still using it on machines where I want a minimal GUI, and besides some minimal changes to ~/.Xresources to adjust Xterm's appearance, everything's still in the same place where it was fifteen years ago.
 
Old 12-21-2016, 05:51 PM   #8
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Summer Midwest USA, Central Illinois, Winter Central Florida
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 13,383
Blog Entries: 31

Rep: Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566Reputation: 2566
Member response

Hi,

For those that wish to look back;
Quote:
Historic SlackwareŽ:
Historic Slackware by Niels Horn <- 'Versions 1.01, 1.1.2, 3.5'
Historic GNU/Linux SlackwareŽ <- 'Versions 1.1.2, 2.1, 3.0, 3.1, 3.9'
Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How Linux got to be Linux: Test driving 1993-2003 distros jeremy Linux - News 0 12-20-2016 09:34 AM
LXer: How Linux got to be Linux: Test driving 1993-2003 distros LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 12-20-2016 08:35 AM
test driving linux by O'Reilly book CD missing TomGun Linux - Newbie 7 11-17-2016 10:48 AM
LXer: Test Driving GNU Hurd, With Benchmarks Against Linux LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 07-18-2011 10:10 AM
LXer: Test Driving Paldo, the Upkg Driven Linux Distribution LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 12-07-2007 01:30 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:24 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration