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Old 07-27-2012, 03:50 PM   #1
completelinuxnube
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How do I copy root the file system of an internal hdd to a usb hdd


I have tried, but I must be missing something.
 
Old 07-27-2012, 03:53 PM   #2
Kustom42
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Uh..

Code:
mount /dev/sdd1(or whatever your usb drive is) /mount/usb
sudo cp -rpv /root /mount/usb
 
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Old 07-27-2012, 04:08 PM   #3
completelinuxnube
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Thanks Kustom42 for the info. I think I asked the wrong question though. What I meant to ask was, how do you copy the / file system of an internal hdd using rsync to a remote host's usb hdd?
 
Old 07-27-2012, 04:09 PM   #4
PTrenholme
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Note, however, that cp -rp / /mount/... will not work because that will attempt to copy several "pseudo" system files (e.g., /dev/null. /dev/random, etc.) that are (logically) infinite in size.

If you want to create an image of your system on a different drive, I'd suggest that to get a copy of Clonezilla and run it from a USB or CD.

Last edited by PTrenholme; 07-27-2012 at 04:11 PM.
 
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Old 07-27-2012, 04:11 PM   #5
completelinuxnube
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@PTrenholme thanks for the information.
 
Old 07-27-2012, 04:14 PM   #6
TobiSGD
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If you want to use rsync it should look like this:
Code:
rsync -a /* /your/USB/mountpoint --exclude-from=exclude-file
Your exclude-file should look similar to this:
Code:
tmp/*
home/*
var/lock/*
var/run/*
dev/*
sys/*
proc/*
media/*
mnt/*
If you want the file under /home also to be copied just remove home/* from that list, if you want to exclude other directories just add them to that list.

For more information about rsync and its options have a look at
Code:
man rsync

Last edited by TobiSGD; 07-27-2012 at 04:16 PM.
 
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Old 07-27-2012, 04:35 PM   #7
Kustom42
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TobiSGD has the right answer, I thought you meant /root/, the explanation given about the pseudo files and devices is completely true.
 
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Old 07-27-2012, 05:18 PM   #8
rknichols
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You can avoid copying other filesystems (both real and pseudo-) with rsync's "-x" (--one-file-system) option. The disadvantage of using that, rather than figuring out the list of what needs to be excluded, is the empty mountpoint directories will not get created at the destination.

You can copy the root filesystem including the mount points (and preserving their original ownership and permissions) this way:
Code:
mkdir -p /mnt/tmproot
mount --bind / /mnt/tmproot
rsync -aH /mnt/tmproot/ remoteSystem:/some/directory
umount /mnt/tmproot
rmdir /mnt/tmproot
The "--bind" option attaches only the single filesystem, not any submounts.

Note that the trailing '/' in the /mnt/tmproot/ argument to rsync is significant since you want to copy the contents of that directory and not create a directory called "tmproot" at the destination. The "-H" option is important for preserving hard links. Without it, hard-linked files are treated as though they were separate files.

As with many things, the devil is in the details.
 
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Old 08-06-2012, 02:22 PM   #9
completelinuxnube
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Thanks to everyone for all of the info.
 
  


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