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Old 07-11-2017, 10:14 AM   #31
a4z
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post

If I won the lottery and became a billionaire overnight, I guess I would happily put together a team to compile and maintain my "perfect" Linux distribution, a blend of Slackware and RHEL. RPM-based with a dependency resolver, BSD init, newbie-friendly like Ubuntu but with Slackware's clean configuration scripts under the hood instead of Ubuntu's mess. I'd call this Yatahongaga Linux, "Yatahongaga" being an ancient pataphysician word meaning nothing in particular.

But then, I don't even play the lottery.

Niki
no need to win in lottery to make RHEL/CentOS to something usful

we use here fpm for packageing, https://github.com/jordansissel/fpm
because writing RPM files basically sucks.

my colleque has written this
https://github.com/FredrikHson/redhat-makepkg

and now we have arch linux like build scripts to build what ever we need
what is what we build with yocto for embedded targets, so basically everything for development ,

except what is tools and can be take via software collections.
https://www.softwarecollections.org/en/

and what we build for us is also a software collection

with this combination I have a top modern RHEL for what I need it, and a super stable one for what I just use.
and build scripts are just scripts, in a shorter way as slackbuilds ....

the great thing is with this is, everyone coming on my machine and log in has a unmodified default RHEL available.
if wanted, he/she can activate the devleopment environment, and voila, latest gcc, gdb, tons of libs and tools ....


When I developed this concept I also had in mind that this could be ported to Slackware, since Slackware comes with RPM, you could use a stock Slackware, and put your own stuff optinal over the Slackware suff via software collection like rpms, written via arch build scripts.

this is actually not that much work, but since I have a local C++ user group running, thing like this on the weekend are not possible anymore
 
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Old 07-11-2017, 10:33 AM   #32
ivandi
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The "Kikinovak leaves Slackware" drama again

You can still use Slackware to show your students what Linux was in the early days when the men were real men


Cheers
 
13 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-11-2017, 11:20 AM   #33
cynwulf
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It's highly likely that Slackware wasn't designed around the needs of certain sysadmins, who wanted everything to be effortless and less time consuming for them. In fact Slackware is Patrick Volkerding's own personal Linux distribution, for you to use (or not) as you see fit. What you do with it and what it can do, really depends on you. It was never conceived as a "mass consumption" subscription offering like RHEL or Windows Server. So if something else does the job better, it's best to skip the drama and just use it.

Last edited by cynwulf; 07-11-2017 at 11:21 AM.
 
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Old 07-11-2017, 11:37 AM   #34
DavidMcCann
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Cynwulf has hit the nail on the head. Actually, you could say that Slackware and RHEL have a major feature in common: they are focused. There are some distros that have a clear idea of what they are supposed to do and who is going to use them: Slackware, RHEL, Arch, PCLinuxOS, Puppy. If you fit the bill, you'll be happy. But there's a lot of stuff out there that leaves me wondering why anyone bothered to produce it!
 
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Old 07-11-2017, 05:15 PM   #35
kikinovak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ivandi View Post
The "Kikinovak leaves Slackware" drama again

You can still use Slackware to show your students what Linux was in the early days when the men were real men


Cheers
Or maybe I'm ready to discover my feminine side with CentOS.

Last edited by kikinovak; 07-12-2017 at 08:48 AM.
 
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Old 07-11-2017, 08:36 PM   #36
Regnad Kcin
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Quote:
Some people think having to do everything manually is the way to go. The way technology is evolving, its minimizing the procedures/steps to get a system updating and running. People are always saying how unique Linux is as a server. But, the same server has hundreds of millions Windows/Macs connecting to it and not hundred of millions Linux desktops/laptops connecting to it. The same people who feel that way, don't assemble their cars, microwaves, build their houses from the ground-up etc.... Most Linux users do have a one-direction attitude. Its bigger than Linux, Microsoft and Macs. I will be testing Neverware/Cloudready for a week or so and I'm back to Windows until Linux catch up. I enjoyed it while it lasted. Thanks for the little knowledge you guys gave. Best wishes.
I build my own computers, because I can't buy anything that works as well as what I can put together myself.
I am responsible for the outcome, and for maintenance, and I am cool with that.

I don't think that it usually turns out as well when I hire others to do the work for me.
"The hireling careth not for the sheep..."

I perceive the mainstream of society to be a open sewer and I have no desire to be a sewer rat in the mindless zombie death-march.

We run a laboratory and we design and build some of our own equipment but we also buy some instruments also.

My background is biology, agriculture, and biomedicine not computer science but I started in computering with punched cards and dumb tty terminals.
My first personal computer ran CP/M and I always thought that CP/M was superior to MS-DOS. I had the misfortune of working with an Apple 2e at one point, hence never really understood the popularity of the whole fruit-box nonsense. Migrated through windows, saw scumbags like Jim Manzi rise and fall, and never understood why anyone admired charlatans like Gates or Steve Jobs. I was very late to try Linux. The demise of winXP contributed much to me wanting to get off the Microsoft merry-go-round. "I think we're all Bozos on this bus."

I tried Kubuntu first and was initially impressed but decided that I hated the whole Ubuntu thing and hated what Kubuntu was doing with my machine. Slackware seemed the obvious choice but I feared the learning curve and tried Salix as it was "easier" (less learning curve, I thought) to get going. Quickly I realized that Salix is a bowdlerized version of the real thing, and got Slackware finally. I keep win7 on my computer since I do need it (less, and less, and less) and it reminds me how much windows really really doth suck.

Since I am a bit of a non-conformist, almost not quite a raggedy pirate, a staunch anarcholibertarian bigot (born 200 years too late), documentably an innovator (i have patents filed by others on my behalf, but actually i resent the whole idea of patenting and its excessive commercial focus), and a bricoleur, Slackware is a good fit for me. I customized my Jeep. Some things I let others do but they never do it as well as I would have done. I have tried a bit to evangelize Slackware to others but most folk seem unbothered by the progressive dumbing-down of windows and find security in bondage. Not me.

I have also tried Arch, and although that community has some great documentation, I found nothing in Arch that made me think it was better for me than Slackware.

Last edited by Regnad Kcin; 07-11-2017 at 08:38 PM.
 
7 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-11-2017, 08:53 PM   #37
Richard Cranium
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Quote:
I had the misfortune of working with an Apple 2e at one point, hence never really understood the popularity of the whole fruit-box nonsense.
Ah, if you had gotten a Apple II+, you would have gotten the disassembled ROM and the schematics of the motherboard. There were 3rd party cards that you could get for various stuff.
 
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Old 07-11-2017, 11:41 PM   #38
travis82
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Good luck Mr. Kovacs and thanks for all your helps.

Thanks to Slackware team and the great community, I found Slackware the most reliable and flexible Linux based OS for my desktop. I have tried both CentOS and Stella before. Not sure your clients like it as much as Slackware based MLED.

Last edited by travis82; 07-11-2017 at 11:44 PM.
 
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Old 07-12-2017, 01:58 AM   #39
RadicalDreamer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travis82 View Post
Good luck Mr. Kovacs and thanks for all your helps.

Thanks to Slackware team and the great community, I found Slackware the most reliable and flexible Linux based OS for my desktop. I have tried both CentOS and Stella before. Not sure your clients like it as much as Slackware based MLED.
If they want Slackware then hopefully they will be directed to Slackware or distributions based on it.
 
Old 07-12-2017, 11:21 AM   #40
gauchao
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Quote:
Ah, if you had gotten a Apple II+, you would have gotten the disassembled ROM and the schematics of the motherboard. There were 3rd party cards that you could get for various stuff.
Right!
 
Old 07-12-2017, 11:34 AM   #41
Darth Vader
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Regnad Kcin View Post
I build my own computers, because I can't buy anything that works as well as what I can put together myself.
I am responsible for the outcome, and for maintenance, and I am cool with that.

I don't think that it usually turns out as well when I hire others to do the work for me.
"The hireling careth not for the sheep..."

I perceive the mainstream of society to be a open sewer and I have no desire to be a sewer rat in the mindless zombie death-march.

We run a laboratory and we design and build some of our own equipment but we also buy some instruments also.

My background is biology, agriculture, and biomedicine not computer science but I started in computering with punched cards and dumb tty terminals.
My first personal computer ran CP/M and I always thought that CP/M was superior to MS-DOS. I had the misfortune of working with an Apple 2e at one point, hence never really understood the popularity of the whole fruit-box nonsense. Migrated through windows, saw scumbags like Jim Manzi rise and fall, and never understood why anyone admired charlatans like Gates or Steve Jobs. I was very late to try Linux. The demise of winXP contributed much to me wanting to get off the Microsoft merry-go-round. "I think we're all Bozos on this bus."

I tried Kubuntu first and was initially impressed but decided that I hated the whole Ubuntu thing and hated what Kubuntu was doing with my machine. Slackware seemed the obvious choice but I feared the learning curve and tried Salix as it was "easier" (less learning curve, I thought) to get going. Quickly I realized that Salix is a bowdlerized version of the real thing, and got Slackware finally. I keep win7 on my computer since I do need it (less, and less, and less) and it reminds me how much windows really really doth suck.

Since I am a bit of a non-conformist, almost not quite a raggedy pirate, a staunch anarcholibertarian bigot (born 200 years too late), documentably an innovator (i have patents filed by others on my behalf, but actually i resent the whole idea of patenting and its excessive commercial focus), and a bricoleur, Slackware is a good fit for me. I customized my Jeep. Some things I let others do but they never do it as well as I would have done. I have tried a bit to evangelize Slackware to others but most folk seem unbothered by the progressive dumbing-down of windows and find security in bondage. Not me.

I have also tried Arch, and although that community has some great documentation, I found nothing in Arch that made me think it was better for me than Slackware.
Amazing! The LQ never stop to shock me! A Chinese knowing about patents? Really?

I truly believed that "patent" is an untranslatable thing in all your 8 major languages. That great Chinese country haunted by Clonezilla, really, but really understand the concept of "patent"?

Oh... I figured out! You are a well occidental educated exception from rule?

I have all respect for you, but in other hand I will like to ask you something, very pragmatic: how much money earned Slackware, Inc. from your side? As you are a Chinese, even living on Beijing, I will safe bet on zero point zero dollars.

In other hand, a company doing a project on top of Slackware, most likely would gain and share money. That's WHY is very sad when a company, even a small one like the Niki's one, leave the Slackware: Slackware, Inc. would loose even more money.

Again, with all respect for you,

Yours Darth Vader.

Last edited by Darth Vader; 07-12-2017 at 12:07 PM.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-12-2017, 01:25 PM   #42
Regnad Kcin
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
Amazing! The LQ never stop to shock me! A Chinese knowing about patents? Really?
...

Oh... I figured out! You are a well occidental educated exception from rule?
It seems that I am not a typical Chinese.

and Dorothy Parker was Marie of Roumania.
 
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Old 07-12-2017, 01:55 PM   #43
Darth Vader
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Be warned that is not a good way to joke about the Queen Marie of Romania...

Even she was born as Princess Marie of Edinburgh, and of course she was with British origins, she devoted so much to the Romanian Kingdom and Nation, that even 150 years later the today Romanians love her so much, until to call her the Mother of the Nation, or just "our Mother".

No other royal figure is loved more than the Queen Marie of Romania. So better do not joke about...

Last edited by Darth Vader; 07-12-2017 at 01:59 PM.
 
Old 07-12-2017, 02:05 PM   #44
Darth Vader
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But, damnit!

How the hell you know about our Queen?

Last edited by Darth Vader; 07-12-2017 at 02:07 PM.
 
Old 07-12-2017, 02:19 PM   #45
Regnad Kcin
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Red face

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vader View Post
But, damnit!

How the hell you know about our Queen?
I only know about Dorothy Parker...
and Miscellanea...

Oh, life is a glorious cycle of song,
A medley of extemporanea;
And love is a thing that can never go wrong;
And I am Marie of Roumania.

-Dorothy Parker, 1937.
 
4 members found this post helpful.
  


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