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Old 04-24-2010, 01:51 AM   #1
saharabear
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Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Jinan, China
Distribution: Slackware, Slackiss
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follow slackware's current or not when I want to make a new distribution


Hi,

Our team want to make a new distribution based on slackware, add some new features on Java development and graphic drivers.but we have some problems on talking, the important is: follow slackware's current update or not.

If we follow slackware's current, we do not have slackware's current source repository, we must follow the current upgrade and merge current source code, if we do not follow slackware's current update, too much work to upgrade the OS.

Any suggestions? or, what about slackware x86_64's development application?

Thanks.
 
Old 04-24-2010, 05:34 AM   #2
Ivshti
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I recommend you to use the stable version. If you do want to support your distro yourself, update the packages yourself, so on, you should go for -current.
 
Old 04-24-2010, 06:26 AM   #3
samac
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Registered: Mar 2004
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If you cannot make that decision should you even be contemplating making a forked distribution? Surely if you have a team, you have an idea of what you wish the distribution to do. If that is the case you should have an idea of how you want to get there. If you have all of these things then you should be able to decide if you want your distribution to be cutting edge or not. As for the x86_64 question, what is your hardware and are there any 32-bit applications that you have to run?

Get your planning right and you will be able to do what you want.

samac
 
Old 04-24-2010, 07:13 PM   #4
T3slider
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Is there a minor detail that you hate that is easily fixed/modified in a distribution? Fork the whole thing! The fragmentation in the Linux community is what will always prevent it from being relevant in the real world (note that I am not saying there are no jobs or uses for Linux in the real world). Egos get the best of people and they decide instead of sticking with a project, or instead of releasing a set of modified packages/patches, they fork the whole thing. I firmly believe that unless you have something that really changes the OS, projects like this are best implemented by package upgrades/extra package sets/patches that can be installed instead of forking the whole thing. Going from Slackware to Arch? Yeah, probably a full fork was necessary since it no longer resembles Slackware at all. But beyond radical changes like that, if you're going to be permanently following a distribution's release cycle and only modifying it (and thus never gaining independence on the project) what is the point of forking it? Now people have to reinstall to your OS despite it being only a few packages different?

Release tagfiles for the Slackware install process along with updated package sets plus any extra package sets and/or repositories you choose. That would be *my* advice. But if you prefer to fragment the Linux community further without really adding much to it, go for it.
 
Old 04-24-2010, 07:45 PM   #5
Josh000
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Registered: Aug 2009
Distribution: Slackware 13 64bit
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When you say new distribution, do you mean a small modification of slackware? Just changing defaults and adding in some extra programs and such?

If that is the case, it may make more sense to just provide the customized and new packages with some sort of installer script.

Also, I would say it makes sense to follow -stable. Those who use -current will be more likely to be able to fix any problems that occur with your packages, which is not true for everyone.
 
  


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