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-   -   Does anyone use the original config "generic" / "generic-smp"? (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/does-anyone-use-the-original-config-generic-generic-smp-4175627410/)

Ne01eX 04-10-2018 10:29 PM

Does anyone use the original config "generic" / "generic-smp"?
 
Subj.:D Without anyone modification.

a4z 04-11-2018 01:29 AM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symmetric_multiprocessing

from some Slackware release announcement

Quote:

There are two kinds of kernels in Slackware. First there are the
huge kernels, which contain support for just about every driver in the
Linux kernel. These are primarily intended to be used for installation,
but there's no real reason that you couldn't continue to run them after
you have installed. The other type of kernel is the generic kernel, in
which nearly every driver is built as a module. To use a generic kernel
you'll need to build an initrd to load your filesystem module and
possibly your drive controller or other drivers needed at boot time,
configure LILO to load the initrd at boot, and reinstall LILO. See the
docs in /boot after installing for more information. Slackware's Linux
kernels come in both SMP and non-SMP types now. The SMP kernel supports
multiple processors, multi-core CPUs, HyperThreading, and about every
other optimization available. In our own testing this kernel has proven
to be fast, stable, and reliable. We recommend using the SMP kernel
even on single processor machines if it will run on them. Note that on
x86_64 (64-bit), all the kernels are SMP capable.
I do not know which was the first version that had this not, but is must have been a while back

bormant 04-11-2018 03:53 AM

Use for what means? Are you about rebuild another kernel only?

Alien Bob 04-11-2018 05:06 AM

I see no reason for myself to modify the generic kernel configuration these days. I used to compile custom kernels a lot but I am exclusively using Slackware's default generic configs now, combined with an initrd, done so for years.

allend 04-11-2018 06:44 AM

^^ +1

bassmadrigal 04-11-2018 07:10 AM

I only use a custom kernel on my Ryzen desktop, partially for better hardware support, but also because I need to enable CONFIG_RCU_NOCB_CPU in my kernel so I could pass rcu_nocbs=0-15 to the kernel (see this post for a few more details on why I need to do it). My other machines use either the generic or huge stock kernels.

igadoter 04-11-2018 07:21 AM

I only once used generic kernel. Since then only huge kernels. In my experience it is more secure when troubles come.

Edit: Maybe my post is little out of subject. If question is about custom kernel.

dugan 04-11-2018 08:10 AM

Yeah I use the stock generic kernel.

chrisretusn 04-11-2018 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien Bob (Post 5841788)
I see no reason for myself to modify the generic kernel configuration these days. I used to compile custom kernels a lot but I am exclusively using Slackware's default generic configs now, combined with an initrd, done so for years.

Same.

Lysander666 04-11-2018 08:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien Bob (Post 5841788)
I see no reason for myself to modify the generic kernel configuration these days. I used to compile custom kernels a lot but I am exclusively using Slackware's default generic configs now, combined with an initrd, done so for years.

Moi aussi, generic-smp unmodified.

jamesf 04-11-2018 09:08 AM

I use the generic 64-bit slackware kernel after I build the initrd for it for my configuration.

Alien Bob 04-11-2018 09:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bassmadrigal (Post 5841818)
I only use a custom kernel on my Ryzen desktop, partially for better hardware support, but also because I need to enable CONFIG_RCU_NOCB_CPU in my kernel so I could pass rcu_nocbs=0-15 to the kernel (see this post for a few more details on why I need to do it). My other machines use either the generic or huge stock kernels.

Thanks for the link, this is something I should apply for my Ryzen-powered build box. I had hard freezes when running QEMU virtual machines in virt-manager. Perhaps this will save me. I had just built a 4.14.33 kernel for the box but will now re-config and re-build the packages.

Ne01eX 04-11-2018 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bormant (Post 5841776)
Use for what means? Are you about rebuild another kernel only?

Ru: Вот и мне интересно, зачем люди возятся с initrd и, вообще, - с модулями, если можно сразу запилить монолит под себя.
En: That's I'm wondering why people use the initrd and modules in general, if can immediately create the monolith for youself.

Ru: На одной из моих машин проставлена Slackware-Current с huge ядром (ванильным). Но она и работает, по большей части, для тестов именно самой Slackware-Current. :-)
En: One of my machines has Slackware-Current with a huge kernel (vanilla). But it works mostly for Slackware-Current tests. :-)

Ru: На другой я использую модифицированную версию ядра. Тоже huge. Для x86 и x86_64. Но это уже совсем не Slackware. :-)
En: On the other, I use a modified kernel version. huge. And for for x86 and for x86_64. But this is not Slackware. :-)

Ru: На самом деле, мне было интересно узнать, - есть ли вообще интерес к generic-ядрам. Увидел - есть. :-)
Ладно, хули, попробую предоставить и "generic" и "huge".


En: In fact, I was curious to know whether there is any interest in "generic" kernels at all. I saw - there is. :-)
Okay, I'll try to distribute and "generic" and "huge".

mralk3 04-11-2018 10:43 AM

I use a generic x86_64 kernel with an initrd.gz.

Didier Spaier 04-11-2018 11:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ne01eX (Post 5841878)
En: In fact, I was curious to know whether there is any interest in "generic" kernels at all.

If not in Slackware 15.0, at least in the next version there won't be a huge kernel anymore anyway, so better be prepared.


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