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Old 10-02-2011, 07:05 PM   #1
stf92
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Can't write to ntfs rw mounted partition.


Kernel 2.6.21.5, slackware 12.0
ntfsprogs 1.13.1

Hi:
I have an NTFS partition and cannot write to it. This partition was created by cfdisk with FS ID 07 (HPFS/NTFS). This is the ID windows XP writes in the partition table. The partition was formatted by the XP installer. Once within XP, I chose to make all files private (other than the adm no user can access them).

Now in linux (Slack 12.0) I cannot mkdir or cp on the NTFS mounted partition, although
Code:
# mount
/dev/hdaa4 on /hdaal type ntfs (rw)
and
Code:
# ls -ld /hdaal
drwx------ root root 4096 /hdaal/
# mkdir /hdaal/foo
mkdir: cannot create directory '/hdaal/foo'. Operation not permitted

Then I searched LQ and found this post, which made me look into the /extra/PACKAGES.TXT and I found the ntfsprogs package, which supposedly contains ntfsmount. To my great deception it does not, as looking in /var/log/packates/ntfsprogs-1.13.1-i484-1 shows. But there is the manual, which says its a module:
Quote:
NTFSMOUNT(8) NTFSMOUNT(8)

NAME
ntfsmount - NTFS module for FUSE.

SYNOPSIS
ntfsmount device mount_point [-o options]

DESCRIPTION
ntfsmount is a FUSE module that rely on libntfs. You need FUSE to com-
pile it, xattr is recommended, but not mandatory.

And contrary to the other programs in the package, it speaks about compiling.

But I doubt I need this package, which nonetheless I installed, given that so many people has linux and windows in their machines, that it seems a little weird mount can't mount in such a way that I can write. The mount manual does not, however, mention any special circumstance when a file system can't be written to, and nothing special in the options for NTFS.


So, the question I do is: Do I have to rely on some /extra directory package (CD 3) or have I the means to write to an NTFS file system, given that I have done a full instalation (in slack 12.0 installing all packages from CDs 1 and 2 is considered a full install).
 
Old 10-02-2011, 07:14 PM   #2
MS3FGX
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The Linux kernel is unable to write to NTFS volumes, it can only mount them in read-only mode. You haven't done anything wrong, this is just a limitation of the kernel.

If you want to get read/write access to NTFS, you need to use NTFS-3G, which should already be installed (it is in the "A" package set). You use the "ntfs-3g" command more or less like the normal mount command, just give it the device node and where you want to mount it.
 
Old 10-02-2011, 07:30 PM   #3
stf92
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Thanks for your post. It's unfortunate, I did 'grep -irl ntfs-3g /var/log/packages' and could not find it. In my system, this means ntfs-3g is nowhere. Perhaps slack 13. I'll look in slackbuilds.
 
Old 10-02-2011, 07:54 PM   #4
Lirey
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As far as I can tell, ntfs-3g was first included in Slackware 12.1. I know it is part of 12.2 - I use it occasionally on one system that is still waiting for an upgrade.

If ntfs-3g won't build under 12.0, upgrading to 12.1 or 12.2 should make it available.
 
Old 10-03-2011, 09:10 AM   #5
stf92
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Thank you, Lirey. I have learned ntfs-g3 can charge the CPU up to a hundred per cent in old machines like mine. I always asked the winXP installer to use FAT32. This time, in a new installation, I decided in favor of NTFS, which was a mistake, as I now see, because then I have no comunication between ext2 and winXP.

Luckily, I have a large empty partition, which now I'll format in FAT32, and everything I create with XP I'll put it in that partition.

At equal CPU/DMA speeds, which makes file I/O faster? FAT32 or NTFS? Or for that matter, ext2 or ext3?
 
Old 10-04-2011, 03:50 AM   #6
Maris-S
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I didn't pay attention on CPU use by ntfs-3g before, but I just tried to mount ntfs volume with using ntfs and ntfs-3g and took a look on CPU use while copying big file from ntfs volume to my home directory and CPU use was almost the same, even it was a bit less for ntfs-3g.

So maybe just check if you have ntfs-3g support, and if CPU use will be acceptable for you. You can try to use ntfs-3g by mounting ntfs partition as root.

Code:
mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdc1 /mnt/hdd
Just change device and mount point according to your system.
 
Old 10-04-2011, 01:24 PM   #7
stf92
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Thanks. I'll do that. ALthough, given the fact my machine is old (kernel 2.6.21.5 running on Pentium III @1100MHz, 256MB RAM), I think the test will yield negative results.
 
Old 10-04-2011, 01:43 PM   #8
MS3FGX
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I really don't see how NTFS-3G could have such a performance issue, especially on a machine that fast. I've run NTFS-3G on my router which has a 400 MHz CPU and 32 MB of RAM...so I'm not sure what you are worried about.
 
Old 10-04-2011, 08:52 PM   #9
stf92
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I have not even downloaded it. But, given your post, I'm ready to give it a try.
 
Old 10-05-2011, 01:52 AM   #10
Maris-S
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In general CPU load on my computer is very similar for ntfs and ntfs-3g, so if ntfs worked fine on your PC, then ntsf-3g should be acceptable too.
 
  


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