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Old 06-10-2013, 02:55 PM   #1
michijo
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Thumbs up A Thread Praising Slackware


I have been using Slackware for maybe 2 years or so, just as an end user not a programmer, and recently tried switching to Debian again. Having only used Slack on my home computer constantly everyday for so long, I found suddenly that while Debian had fast food type dependency resolution, it was ultimately slower and packages broke more, with confused messages from apt-get. I also found that Iceweasel took 5 minutes to startup, and that even downloading firefox, it still lagged.

I consequently went to reinstall Slackware, downloaded 14.0 again after only one day of Debian. I found that Brasero failed to burn the DVD properly. After finally getting the slack image burned, I reinstalled it. Actually, I found it was a pretty fast installation, even compared to Debian's "net install", which took forever to download so much crap.

Slack reinstalled really fast, and it had (MOC) Music on Console already preinstalled on 14.0. I find I prefer the slower dependency resolution of Slackware, because you know each package, and they rarely break after being resolved. I could not even say what was installed on Debian. Also, I couldnt get rid of the GDM login entry. I was already used to typing 'startx' in Slackware.

Slackware is fast and breaks less than monocultural Debian based destros. Thanks for Slackware!
 
Old 06-10-2013, 02:57 PM   #2
mrclisdue
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Let me be the first to ask:

Are you sure you posted this in the correct forum?

(insert smiley face emoticon here)

cheers,
 
Old 06-10-2013, 03:31 PM   #3
Phorize
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You are right that Slackware is awesome. I'm not sure that you are right about Debian though, it is a seriously solid OS, and apt is very mature.
 
Old 06-10-2013, 03:42 PM   #4
kikinovak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michijo View Post
Slackware is fast and breaks less than monocultural Debian based destros. Thanks for Slackware!
I don't follow you on that. If I had to use something else than Slackware, I'd be quite happy with Debian. Been working with it regularly since Potato.
 
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Old 06-10-2013, 04:30 PM   #5
TalonNexaris
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The last time I tried Debian Wheezy on my Thinkpad T61, it would often hang on shutdown and the Debian-provided version of Adblock Plus had a hanging issue as well. Slackware ran flawlessly on the same system.
 
Old 06-10-2013, 05:58 PM   #6
mrclisdue
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
...Been working with it regularly since Potato.
That was Debian?

http://www.bbspot.com/news/2008/12/l...-a-potato.html

(insert smiley emoticon, once again)

cheers,
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 06-10-2013, 06:31 PM   #7
TobiSGD
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This is a little bit unfair against Debian:
- Comparing the speed of a netinstall with the speed of an install from DVD. When I used Debian as my main OS i preferred to do network based installs from a local mirror, the same thing I do now with Slackware. There is not really a speed difference between a Debian install and a Slackware install when it comes to that.
- Blaming Debian because you didn't know how to disable gdm. You can hardly blame Debian for not being exactly like Slackware, Debian handles run-levels and services different, simple as that. A simple
Code:
update-rc.d gdm3 remove
would have done the job.
- Blaming Debian for breaking: FWIW, my home-server, running 24/7 with Debian, is still the same installation that I have made when I bought the machine, starting with Debian Lenny, upgraded to Squeeze, now to Wheezy, without any kind of breakage. Debian can break, but only if you run Testing or Unstable and don't know how to prevent the breakage. Stable never breaks.

Slackware is a great OS, but if it is not available to me for whatever reason (mostly when it comes to VPS systems) I always choose Debian.
 
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Old 06-10-2013, 06:37 PM   #8
WhiteHotLoveTiger
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I had a very similar experience recently. I'd been using Slackware for about a year and a half, and as my main OS for a little over a year. A few weeks ago I made the mistake of deciding to try out -current on my primary system. I was half way through when I ran into a problem updating Network Manager while I was using wifi to download the new packages. My networking knowledge is not great (hence I use Network Manager) and I couldn't get connected again, despite many efforts and trying different things. Maybe I should have come here for help, but I decided that this was a sign I should try out a more "user-friendly" distro.

I read up on a few and decided to take the plunge into Fedora with Gnome. I hadn't used Gnome in years, and I was used to usually using fluxbox on Slackware. I was shocked at how horrible Gnome was. Simple tasks were impossible to complete. I now understand why everyone complains about it. Anyhow, I decided to give Mint a go. Cinnamon is better than Gnome, and I could probably have gotten used to it, but when trying to install some packages, I descended into a small dependency hell. The package I wanted to install insisted upon a version of a particular dependency that was earlier than the one available. Asking for help on the forums only turned up another person interested in knowing if there was a way around the issue. From here I decided to try out FreeBSD. I figured that some parts of Slackware were similar to BSD, so maybe I'd feel more at home. FreeBSD was pretty solid actually. I'd recommend trying it out if you've never used it. I probably could have gotten used to FreeBSD if I gave myself more time with it, but I was having a few problems getting things like my sound to work properly, and I didn't feel up to digging in and messing around with it. At this point I gave Arch a go. I'd heard that it's similar to Slackware, but I had issues with the installer. This was mostly my own fault for not reading the installation instructions on the website, however I will say that the Arch installation readme file is terrible! It references programs not included on the install disk, and is based off of an html page which includes links to other sections not included on the install image! I don't think I ended up ever finishing the Arch installation, I got too fed up with it. So, I figured that I'd try Fedora again, but this time with KDE. This was alright. Things mostly just worked, and Fedora didn't get in my way too much. However, there were a few issues, like the Apper package manager giving me bogus errors after installing every package (even though it was a fresh install). I lived with Fedora & KDE for the longest, about a week or two, but as time went on, I slowly confirmed in my mind that the only option left for me was to go back to Slackware. I did think about Debian, even going as far as to burn an install disk, but at that point I knew what I really wanted anyhow. I wanted to go back to the slack, where the system stays out of your way, everything is available to be tuned to your liking, the installation is simple, and everything just works.

Of course, this time around I'm going to stick with the stable releases (at least for now ).

Last edited by WhiteHotLoveTiger; 06-10-2013 at 06:38 PM. Reason: grammar
 
Old 06-10-2013, 07:12 PM   #9
frankbell
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As a confirmed Slackware user, who has wandered many places, but always comes back to Slackware's elegant simplicity, I must insist on giving Debian a little love.

I use it on my file server (on which I also do some of general purpose computing--mainly composing documents, surfing LQ, and reading man pages so I can answer LQ questions).

Debian is rock-solid. It's got a few quirks, like its configuration of runlevels, but it is a nice piece of work.

I have used it on that machine long enough to successfully conduct two dist-upgrades (Lenny to Squeeze to Wheezy) and it just keeps chugging along.

Slackware's number one, but, as far as I am concerned, Debian is definitely the runner-up.
 
Old 06-10-2013, 07:27 PM   #10
Netnovice
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If I may speak in Debian (Mint’s) defence without decrying Slackware.

I went with Slackware for two reasons:
1) Learning. For various reasons I have to know Linux. No Mint or Unbuntu but raw Linux. (I am getting there bit by bit.) I do not think there is a better version for learning that Slackware. Version 14 anyway.
2) It was a distro I could firmly run *offline.* I hate being reliant on the internet.

I tried Kubuntu at first and it was a disaster. There was so little installed I could not hope to run it offline plus the control of the touchpad on my netbook was just awful. It was near unusable. Slackware just treated the thing as a PS/2 mouse and everything ran fine.

But there is no way I could dump slackware on a non-techie. I may be pretty new to Linux but I was in software testing for fifteen years – and I don’t mean being a script monkey. I wrote the manual on setting up the flat file system plus SQL database down to writing the batch files to set up substituted drives (yeah, the 'database' was THAT crazy!) So, while I cannot claim to be a guru, I can claim some technical knowledge. Well now I am in Indonesia where the level of education is just AWFUL. It’s ranked one the worst in the world and with good reason. I won’t moan about it now.

Anyway, you have a lot of Indonesians to whom the cost of Windows alone is a months wages. Literally. So I am turning heads here with Linux and its promise of free, usuable software. But with the education level here and the lack of technical skill as a result, I have to provide a version of Linux usable by the masses. The very poor here have never touched a computer.

Well, I have blown people away with the capabilities of Slackware with KDE but I had to turn to Mint – a Debian based distro - for two laptops; one very new, one extremely old (three more in the pipeline but I am too tied up right now.)

I confess, my loyalty to Slackware was shaken. Mint has run seamlessly one both machines – moreso than Slackware on my two netbooks – and does not run slow. Online installation via synaptic has been a dream and essential for fast software supply. The DIY approach with Slackware is great for learning, kinda fun actually, but it is time consuming especially when building for sources on a single core atom! That’s OK for me and I am building up my own software repository but the average user in Indonesia has no hope of that. When I get a machine to put Linux on it won’t be for light use. Any PC in Indonesia is going to be a major workhorse and can only be out of commission for a limited amount of time. I have to tell people, “No, I cannot just install Linux over windows this evening. It isn’t going to work!” Shows how popular it is proving mind…

Anyway, my experience with Mint has been excellent. Both laptops I have installed in on have (once I got online) been a breeze to set up, proven robust, friendly for first time users (I always go the KDE route as it is closest to Windows and user appreciate that) and just… smooth. Users love it!

I am glad I went the Slackware route. If I had gone Mint I would have learnt what I have and I do not mind dropping to the command prompt. But I had gone Mint first (and I have now learnt how you can run Mint offline) I would have screamed going to Slackware. Mint DE is a very comfortable place. Too comfortable - I would become lazy I think - but it is seamless!

I have praised Slackware on this forum and even sent a “thank you” to the developers by email. But horses for courses. The average user is just not going to be editing lilo.conf, rc files and installing from the command line. Mint is excellent. In fact, I think I will praise it on the Mint forum later. Fair is fair. Slackware works for me but Mint works for the average user here in Indonesia.

I am pleased to see so many Slackers being fair here and giving Debian it’s due. Linux means choice. We have two distro bases which are solid. Hooray! Everyone wins!
 
Old 06-10-2013, 08:19 PM   #11
ReaperX7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michijo View Post
I have been using Slackware for maybe 2 years or so, just as an end user not a programmer, and recently tried switching to Debian again. Having only used Slack on my home computer constantly everyday for so long, I found suddenly that while Debian had fast food type dependency resolution, it was ultimately slower and packages broke more, with confused messages from apt-get. I also found that Iceweasel took 5 minutes to startup, and that even downloading firefox, it still lagged.

I consequently went to reinstall Slackware, downloaded 14.0 again after only one day of Debian. I found that Brasero failed to burn the DVD properly. After finally getting the slack image burned, I reinstalled it. Actually, I found it was a pretty fast installation, even compared to Debian's "net install", which took forever to download so much crap.

Slack reinstalled really fast, and it had (MOC) Music on Console already preinstalled on 14.0. I find I prefer the slower dependency resolution of Slackware, because you know each package, and they rarely break after being resolved. I could not even say what was installed on Debian. Also, I couldnt get rid of the GDM login entry. I was already used to typing 'startx' in Slackware.

Slackware is fast and breaks less than monocultural Debian based destros. Thanks for Slackware!
Welcome home.
 
Old 06-10-2013, 08:33 PM   #12
hitest
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As we are praising Slackware I would like to thank Patrick and the entire Slackware Team for the 3.9.5 kernel in Slackware-current.

Code:
Linux loki 3.9.5-smp #2 SMP Mon Jun 10 02:54:26 CDT 2013 i686 Intel(R) Pentium(R) D CPU 2.80GHz GenuineIntel GNU/Linux
 
Old 06-10-2013, 08:43 PM   #13
mrclisdue
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiteHotLoveTiger View Post
...I made the mistake of deciding to try out -current on my primary system. I was half way through when I ran into a problem updating Network Manager while I was using wifi to download the new packages...
Off topic for this particular thread, but *just-in-case*:

Without full knowledge of the particulars, I'm going to guess that your updating process broke because libs needed by wget were upgraded before wget, resulting in wget failing.

There have been a couple of fairly recent threads suggesting that the option in slackpkg.conf to turn ON the download_all option will help to prevent this kind of breakage (I *believe* this has recently become the default (tho' I am a child of the 60's, so I may have hallucinated this in the changelog)).

Anyhow, not to suggest that you try -current again, but it may help others....


cheers,
 
Old 06-10-2013, 08:54 PM   #14
ReaperX7
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-Current is really only for testing purposes. You should stick to the main releases for stability reasons and driver support.
 
Old 06-10-2013, 09:11 PM   #15
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
Slackware's number one, but, as far as I am concerned, Debian is definitely the runner-up.
As far as Linux goes, you're right.

The thing is, if Slackware wasn't available, I'd probably drop Linux altogether.
 
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