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Old 12-03-2018, 08:20 PM   #1
1337_powerslacker
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50th anniversary of UNIX


It has recently come to my realization that 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of UNIX. I think it relevant that some remarkable facts regarding its long life be pointed out, and in connection with that, why Slackware owes its awesomeness to both UNIX and Linux.

If we accept the old-school definition of hacking as making something do what it wasn't designed to do, then UNIX is the ultimate hackers' dream OS.

UNIX started its life on an underpowered minicomputer, the PDP-7. If we compare its capabilities (and indeed, the culture of the time) to what we accept as normal today, several things become apparent:

Unix wasn't designed to:
  • Run a GUI
  • Do modern gaming
  • Run on supercomputers
  • Run on personal computers
  • Run on multi-core PCs
  • Run on tablets and smartphones (via Android)

NOTE: Note the word modern. Gaming has been a part of the computing scene since the 60s, but I'm referring to gaming as we know it today.

UNIX was developed by the community for the community's needs, and as those needs evolved, UNIX was taken along for the ride.

Linux brought to the table some new, innovative concepts:
  • It merged with the advent of the Internet to create a new style of collaboration, a worldwide sharing of talent that would otherwise not have been possible.
  • It merged with the vast collection of GNU tools to create a complete OS, free for the downloading (legally, I might add).

Of course, the problem of package management remained to be solved, but that has been well-documented elsewhere.

Slackware didn't bring any new concepts to the table. Rather, it retained some time-proven concepts:
  • Style of development: the same person who started it 25 years ago is still in charge, doing what he did then; oversee personally its development and evolution.
  • Retain init system: What worked well for decades has been left alone, and still does the job for which it was originally designed.
  • Manual system administration: It is up to the user to maintain his/her system according to personal style.

I think it a personal privilege and honor to be able to leverage the millions of man-hours that have been invested into UNIX/Linux/Slackware and run it on my personal machine. I to those who personally invested time and energy into making Slackware, its roots firmly in Linux, and Linux's roots firmly in UNIX, the awesome OS it is today.
 
Old 12-04-2018, 02:30 AM   #2
kikinovak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1337_powerslacker View Post
UNIX started its life on an underpowered minicomputer, the PDP-7. If we compare its capabilities (and indeed, the culture of the time) to what we accept as normal today, several things become apparent:

Unix wasn't designed to:
  • Run a GUI
  • Do modern gaming
  • Run on supercomputers
  • Run on personal computers
  • Run on multi-core PCs
  • Run on tablets and smartphones (via Android)
I'm old enough to occasionally appreciate the simple and yet astonishing fact that I'm running a Unix clone on my home computer, without ruining myself. Here's a short history of Unix and Linux I've written in French.

Cheers,

Niki
 
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Old 12-04-2018, 12:11 PM   #3
EdGr
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My first exposure to UNIX was with Version 7 UNIX in 1982. 40 undergraduate students trying to compile and run their programs on a DEC PDP-11/70 made for a miserable user experience.

However, UNIX was very powerful and had sound design principles. It could be extended to perform all modern computing tasks. Advances in hardware and software technology turned the user experience into a pleasant one. Today, I can throw dozens of compile and run jobs at my high-end desktop PC and it won't even bog down.

I commend Slackware for adhering to the UNIX design principles. In many ways, Slackware is the heir to the UNIX legacy. Slackware users may not realize this, but you are running modern UNIX.
Ed
 
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Old 01-18-2019, 05:55 AM   #4
rubenX
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Hallo to all...

I need to contact mr .Ed Grochowski
I have few questions about his site.
I like to download few his old software but i don't know how?
so any help is appreciated thanks !
 
Old 01-18-2019, 06:21 AM   #5
Lysander666
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ruben, he posted above you, so he may respond in this thread.

Send him a private message?

Last edited by Lysander666; 01-18-2019 at 06:22 AM.
 
Old 01-18-2019, 11:51 AM   #6
EdGr
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Thanks for asking, rubenX.

The old software described on my website is not available for download. Those programs either ran on Windows or on hardware that one cannot buy.

My current software projects run on Linux. I may release a few of them in the future.
Ed
 
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Old 01-18-2019, 01:12 PM   #7
rubenX
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Hi Ed
first ,,thanks for reply .
In fact it is really strange (for me) to have such a good programs
and no one cannot download it.
I am interested in two:

BASIC interpreter
CED schematic editor - which looks really great.
I work on hobby electronics so that is why I ask.
Also i have in plan to build or remaster small distro based on Slack/Slax
or maybe tinCore ..i am not sure yet..

If you change your mind send me email on :
aurelw.wiz@gmail.com

all best...
 
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Old 01-18-2019, 03:26 PM   #8
EdGr
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Hi ruben - you may want to look into FreeBASIC and GSchem, both of which are likely more standards-compliant than BASIC5 and Ced. I wrote those programs because there were no open-source equivalents in the 1980s.
Ed
 
Old 01-18-2019, 05:44 PM   #9
ehartman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdGr View Post
My first exposure to UNIX was with Version 7 UNIX in 1982. 40 undergraduate students trying to compile and run their programs on a DEC PDP-11/70 made for a miserable user experience.
Try a lab full of graduate students working on a PDP-11/40 (max memory 128 KB) in the middle 70's (Amsterdam University physics lab).
My own first experience (NON-Unix) was on a PDP-11/10 with only 16 KB of real core memory which was used in the lab for instrument control (and because of that lack of memory most process control software had to be written in assembler).
 
Old 01-18-2019, 08:48 PM   #10
Richard Cranium
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehartman View Post
Try a lab full of graduate students working on a PDP-11/40 (max memory 128 KB) in the middle 70's (Amsterdam University physics lab).
Imagine the same, only using a shell that acted a lot like MP/M. Up to and including pip (Peripheral Interchange Program), which you could use to copy a PASCAL object file to some poor sod's terminal which would lead him/her to thing the PDP had crashed.

Not that I ever did such a thing. (More than 10 times, that is.)
 
Old 01-19-2019, 01:45 AM   #11
rubenX
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Ed

you sayed on your site:

This is Ced rewritten in the C language and running under Windows. One nice property of all three editors (Ced, MindsEye, and the GeniusWriter) is that they present consistent user interfaces and employ similar internal algorithms and data structures.

Such a simplicity you cannot find in todays programs and because is written in C (CED) that
mean that should work on any version of Windows also can be translated to Linux with for example GTK or Iup.
 
Old 01-19-2019, 02:18 AM   #12
LuckyCyborg
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I thought that in the direct genealogy line, FreeBSD is the UNIX heir.

Those who want the UNIX experience can always install FreeBSD and leave Linux alone.

I understand that Linux is something like "a better MINIX kernel" driving a whatever desktop or web server.

Last edited by LuckyCyborg; 01-19-2019 at 02:33 AM.
 
Old 01-19-2019, 05:36 AM   #13
ehartman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuckyCyborg View Post
I thought that in the direct genealogy line, FreeBSD is the UNIX heir.
One of the Unix versions, BSD is a branch of the original AT&T Unix (version 5 or 6, I believe). The generic university distributed version was version 7 or PWB/Unix - which became the base for the later commercial versions of System III and System V Unix, but in the meantime BSD had diversified a lot from these Unix versions.

A few of the main differences: printer spooler (lpr/lpq/lpd vs lp/lpstat/lpadmin), networking (rcp/rlogin/rsh vs telnet/ftp) and especially the shell (Bourne and later the Posix shell + Korn shell vs the C-shell).

BTW: the "real" BSD had its end-of-life around 1990 (4.3) and then its sources became open-source, so that the free versions could take from there.
 
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Old 01-19-2019, 09:53 AM   #14
EdGr
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Rubin - the issues are not technical.

The problem is that there are already free and open-source programs that do the same things, and their authors did not make money from them.

Only the big open-source projects have sources of funding. Everything else does not make money.
Ed
 
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Old 01-19-2019, 03:03 PM   #15
rubenX
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EdGr

Everything is ok if you don't want to publish or enable download of your programs.
They are yours of course .
I ..just saying that would be nice to try and see how work...
Yes there are many similar software but 50% of them not work properly
or are with lot of bugs...

No problem...
 
  


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