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Old 06-10-2019, 07:32 AM   #61
ntubski
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Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: Debian, Arch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carlito386 View Post
Incidentally, if you want to install Opera web-browser onto Debian - you need to add the Opera repo onto your
Code:
/etc/apt/sources.list
Debian says you then have to trust the Opera repo.
So this is a clear example of Debian going outside of its ecosystem to offer users 'choice'.
This may become a worrying trend.
It's always been the case that if you install a proprietary binary package, you have to trust that repo, obviously Debian has no way of verifying it.
 
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Old 06-11-2019, 03:10 PM   #62
carlito386
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carlito386 View Post
The idea of browser fingerprinting (Wikipedia) shows a user can be identified by various info held on their web-browser.
Web-browser fingerprinting could be used by a bank for example to make sure it's you making a transaction from your PC at home - and not someone else.
But it can also show your browsing history.

To avoid this we can turn off javascript (i.e. use NoScript) and use anti-tracking add-ons (e.g. uBlock Origin, Ghostery).

The above Wikipedia link says:
'Firefox provides a feature to protect against browser fingerprinting... but as of July 2018 it is still experimental and disabled by default.'

This 'resist fingerprinting' feature can be enabled by following this Mozilla page.
For good opsec - I think it is perhaps more advisable to use the FF 'resist fingerprinting' feature once FF green lights it.
Currently the feature is at its 'experimental' stage.
Which means we are taking a risk if we use it.
 
Old 06-11-2019, 03:18 PM   #63
RickDeckard
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Location: Acworth, Georgia, USA
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Anything that's been in the experimental stage longer than a year, I'd think long and hard before using.
 
  


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