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Old 08-14-2019, 10:44 AM   #1
permaroot
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Looks like Centos 8 is almost ready! Anyone making the jump when it does?


Seems they are wrapping things up and integrating the installer into the image. Anyone switching from 7 straight away? Any things you hope they have changed or added?
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Old 08-15-2019, 05:20 AM   #2
jsbjsb001
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Personally, I've already made the jump to OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 from CentOS 7, but I'll still be downloading an ISO for CentOS 8. As I'll be interested to see if they've switched from yum to dnf (which funnily enough OpenMandriva uses, dnf that is) - not that dnf is all that different mind you (at least as far as using it is concerned anyway).

I'll also be installing CentOS 8 into a VM - just to keep up. Plus it will likely be useful if someone posts a question about CentOS 8.
 
Old 08-15-2019, 06:49 AM   #3
dc.901
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To officially switch, I'm going to wait until 8.2 or 8.3 release; if it is going to be similar to last time where more up to date packages were available on 6.x vs 7.0...
Will certainly give it a test in a VM however.
 
Old 08-15-2019, 07:03 AM   #4
ehartman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc.901 View Post
To officially switch, I'm going to wait until 8.2 or 8.3 release;
With the normal update schedules, 8.2 will not come until 2020 and 8.3 certainly not earlier then 2021, probably 2022
About once a year is the normal RHEL practice.
Look at the CentOS 7 versioning
Quote:
7.0.1406 04/07/2015 12:00:00 AM
7.1.1503 01/08/2016 12:00:00 AM
7.2.1511 01/28/2017 12:00:00 AM
7.3.1611 10/25/2017 12:00:00 AM
7.4.1708 05/24/2018 12:00:00 AM
7.5.1804 01/04/2019 12:00:00 AM
7.6.1810 12/02/2018 12:00:00 AM
and RHEL 7.7 (there's no CentOS release yet) was released in 1908
(the minor of the CentOS release is the year/month of the RHEL source it was based on)

So from 7.0 to 7.3 it took more then 2 years. The .1 update is often rather soon as just after the first release many problems come out, but only 7.5 to 7.6 was just half a year (all based on the RHEL releases, the date field isn't reliable because of later changes).

Last edited by ehartman; 08-15-2019 at 07:04 AM.
 
Old 08-15-2019, 02:02 PM   #5
permaroot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbjsb001 View Post
Personally, I've already made the jump to OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 from CentOS 7, but I'll still be downloading an ISO for CentOS 8. As I'll be interested to see if they've switched from yum to dnf (which funnily enough OpenMandriva uses, dnf that is) - not that dnf is all that different mind you (at least as far as using it is concerned anyway).

I'll also be installing CentOS 8 into a VM - just to keep up. Plus it will likely be useful if someone posts a question about CentOS 8.
Any reason they would drop yum for dnf or a reason you prefer it to yum? Iíve never used a distro that used dnf before
 
Old 08-15-2019, 09:27 PM   #6
dieselboy
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I tested RHEL 8 recently and a lot of applications were not supported there yet. I'll be keen to use it once it's supported from an application point of view.

I'm also interested in the hype around dnf. Is it just better because it's easier to type?
 
Old 08-15-2019, 10:21 PM   #7
Timothy Miller
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I won't be putting it into production immediately, but I'll be uploading it to my Nutanix to use and making a few test machines to make sure I can easily get everything working that I normally use. Then I might rebuild my servers with 8.

Quote:
Originally Posted by permaroot View Post
Any reason they would drop yum for dnf or a reason you prefer it to yum? I’ve never used a distro that used dnf before
They've been planning this for years. DNF came out with Fedora 20 (maybe 22, but definitely that timeframe) and it was the plan all along to replace yum with dnf in RHEL 8 (so CentOS also would follow suit for obvious reasons). The major reason is that DNF has more features than yum (don't ask me what features, I've never found anything I needed from dnf that yum didn't do the same). But literally DNF stands for DaNdiFied yum.

Last edited by Timothy Miller; 08-15-2019 at 10:23 PM.
 
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Old 08-16-2019, 12:19 AM   #8
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by permaroot View Post
Any reason they would drop yum for dnf or a reason you prefer it to yum? I’ve never used a distro that used dnf before
I think Timothy Miller has addressed your first question perfectly, and that was pretty much what I would have said myself anyway.

I never said "I prefer dnf", I did say that from a usability point of view, I don't see much difference.

Last edited by jsbjsb001; 08-16-2019 at 12:29 AM. Reason: correction, not "yum", "dnf".
 
  


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