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Old 08-11-2019, 10:20 AM   #1
Rahul589
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Debian boots in like server boots


I am using Debian 10-Buster.
I am getting only a single problem that my
Laptop boots in command line saying [OK].
Somewhat like that plzz help me out.
 
Old 08-11-2019, 10:56 AM   #2
hazel
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Most Linux machines scroll through some boot-up text at the beginning. Various background processes are set up and you get an [OK] notification (usually in green) after each one. Finally you should get to some kind of login prompt. Usually this is a graphical login screen but, if the graphical desktop fails to come up for some reason, you get a text login prompt at the top of a blank black screen.

It's difficult to work out from your post exactly what you are seeing. Does it get stuck on launching and OK'ing the background jobs? If so, which is the last one to be OK'd? Or do you actually have a login prompt at the end but not the graphical one you expected? More information please! And don't use text-speak. Some people here find that really annoying.
 
Old 08-11-2019, 11:22 AM   #3
Rahul589
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https://we.tl/t-ht3k7prl6Y

Please head over to that link and help me out.Its what i getting on boot.
Help me fix this.
And i can get to login screen after the commands done prompting..
 
Old 08-11-2019, 11:38 AM   #4
hazel
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That boot sequence looks pretty normal to me except that you seem to be missing some ath10k wi-fi firmware. That could get in the way of your internet access. So am I right in supposing that you finally get to a text login screen, because your image doesn't show this.

If so, the first thing to try in these cases is to log in and type startx. If a desktop then comes up, you are probably booting to the wrong target. It's been a while since I used Debian (which is a systemd distro these days) but I seem to remember that you need to set the "default" target to graphical.target or something like that.

PS: apparently the command "sytemctl get-default" will tell you what your current default target is. If it isn't graphical.target, you will need to change it.

Last edited by hazel; 08-11-2019 at 11:43 AM. Reason: Added PS
 
Old 08-11-2019, 05:33 PM   #5
goumba
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Quote:
So am I right in supposing that you finally get to a text login screen, because your image doesn't show this.
If I understand his posts properly, he can get to the login and do so, he's just not happy with seeing the scrolling text. Debian by default does not use plymouth - although it does use "quiet" by deault which should suppress those messages.

In this case the OP will have to edit /boot/grub2/grub.cfg and add "quiet splash" to the end of the line that starts with "linux".
Also, he would have to install plymouth, using synaptic.
 
Old 08-12-2019, 01:41 AM   #6
ondoho
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Solution:
Use a Newbie-friendly distro like Ubuntu or Mint.
Seriously, after that problem description, do you think systemctl commands or editing grub.cfg in cli is good advice here?
 
Old 08-12-2019, 07:57 AM   #7
hazel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
Solution:
Use a Newbie-friendly distro like Ubuntu or Mint.
Seriously, after that problem description, do you think systemctl commands or editing grub.cfg in cli is good advice here?
That depends on whether he is getting a text login prompt. It's not clear from his posts whether he is or not. If I said that my machine "boots like a server", I probably would mean that I was expecting a graphical login and hadn't got one, so I assumed that was what he meant. In which case it would have to be either a fatal error in X or a wrong systemd target. The first could be checked with startx and the second with systemctl show-default.

On the other hand, if he is getting a graphical login and simply doesn't like the scrolling boot messages, then my advice is irrelevant.
 
Old 08-12-2019, 03:26 PM   #8
ondoho
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^ No, what I meant is: the way op describes their problem colors them a very un-techy person getting confused by anything that is not pointy-clicky, so I don't think there's much point giving advanced cli advice.

But we shall see what they have to say for themselves.
 
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:48 AM   #9
hazel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
^ No, what I meant is: the way op describes their problem colors them a very un-techy person getting confused by anything that is not pointy-clicky, so I don't think there's much point giving advanced cli advice.
I see where you're coming from. But what happens when such a person can't get to a graphical login? It happened to a completely non-technical friend of mine. Then the only way to fix the situation (apart from reinstalling and hoping for the best) is to log in anyway and use some commands. Even a non-technical person should be able to cope if he's told what command to use and is simply required to report the result.

Also I think it's difficult to judge the knowledge level of someone who is clearly struggling with the English language.
 
Old 08-14-2019, 03:10 AM   #10
goumba
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
Solution:
Use a Newbie-friendly distro like Ubuntu or Mint.
Seriously, after that problem description, do you think systemctl commands or editing grub.cfg in cli is good advice here?
That's why I didn't get into detail. I was waiting for a follow-up, and if OP said "what's grub?" yeah, I wasn't even going to go any further.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel
That depends on whether he is getting a text login prompt. It's not clear from his posts whether he is or not.
And that's where ondoho's point comes in. OP says it only boots "server like", then says he can the "log in screen" after the "commands" are done. I understand non-tech and non-English speaking, but combine the two for a distro requiring some level of knowledge and ondoho's not wrong.

Not for nothing all these replies, the OP has to have gotten a notification and hasn't even followed up.

Last edited by goumba; 08-14-2019 at 03:15 AM.
 
  


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