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2018 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2018 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite projects/products of 2018. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends on February 12th.


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View Poll Results: Server Distribution of the Year
CentOS 50 19.76%
Container Linux 0 0%
Debian Stable 46 18.18%
Gentoo 5 1.98%
Oracle Linux 0 0%
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 25 9.88%
Scientific Linux 0 0%
Slackware 65 25.69%
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 14 5.53%
Ubuntu LTS 48 18.97%
Voters: 253. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-21-2019, 09:56 AM   #46
Ook
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Registered: Apr 2004
Location: Hell, Arizona (July - 118 degrees)
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 soon to be Slackware 15
Posts: 589

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
how?
does slackware have compulsory package management like debian?

so there were no kernel updates?
what about kernel security patches?

thanks for taking the time to explain things a little.
Slackware does not have compulsory anything. The mentality of the devs is more-or-less let us do what we want, when we want, how we want. While this can lead to out of date boxes for those that are too lazy, don't know how or for other reasons choose not to apply updates, it also gives us max control over our systems. I despise compulsory anything, and I despise high level of hand holding, which is not only why I left the Windows world, but is why I settled with Slackware.

Slackware 14.1 is using the 3.10.107 kernel, which was last updated June 2017 and hit end of life November 2017. I don't think Slackware 14.1 itself is at end of life, so I don't know why it still runs that old kernel, nor if there are any security implications for doing so. Since they have not updated the kernel for so long, the box did not require a reboot. It runs 24/7, never goes down, never needs attention. It just keeps running.

43 days ago I discovered the kernel had reached end of life, so decided to update the kernel. I didn't have time to rebuild the box, so I kept Slackware 14.1 and just installed a new kernel, 4.9.148. I see 4.9 is now up to 4.9.159, so I might update the kernel again.

I use the "slackpkg" package manager, which I think is the "official" package manager, to keep the box update.

So the question that comes to mind is, why is Slackware 14.1 still running an end of life kernel, and are their any security implications for doing so?
 
Old 02-22-2019, 07:43 AM   #47
ondoho
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Registered: Dec 2013
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Thanks for these insights.
I'm beginning to realise that Slackware philosophy is not for me, at least not as far as computers are concerned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ook View Post
43 days ago I discovered the kernel had reached end of life, so decided to update the kernel. I didn't have time to rebuild the box, so I kept Slackware 14.1 and just installed a new kernel, 4.9.148.
and how did you switch to the new kernel without rebooting?
and is it still running smoothly & stable after the upgrade?

Quote:
So the question that comes to mind is, why is Slackware 14.1 still running an end of life kernel, and are their any security implications for doing so?
um, yes, i think that is what i was asking.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 02-22-2019, 08:06 AM   #48
Ook
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: Hell, Arizona (July - 118 degrees)
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 soon to be Slackware 15
Posts: 589

Rep: Reputation: 116Reputation: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
Thanks for these insights.
I'm beginning to realise that Slackware philosophy is not for me, at least not as far as computers are concerned.

and how did you switch to the new kernel without rebooting?
and is it still running smoothly & stable after the upgrade?

um, yes, i think that is what i was asking.
There is nothing wrong with that - some people want a distro that does things for them. Some people want a distro that does NOT do things for them. I don't like an OS to do everything for me, I prefer the stability and ease of repair that comes with configuring and installing and doing things myself. But having over 30 years experience with computers, I can do this with ease. I fully understand that not everyone can do that, and not everyone that can do things like that, wants to do it.

In the software development world, there is a saying that too many programmers sadly do not understand - "Just because you can do something does not make it a good idea". I think in the OS maintenance realm, that would be "Just because I can do something doesn't mean I want to". :-)

After I switched the kernel, I rebooted. That is why it got a reboot after over a year of 24/7 operation. Today it is at 44 days of uptime, and is as rock solid stable as it's always been. When I have some spare time, I'll update the entire OS, but for now the Slackware devs keep that distro patched and up to date (besides the kernel), so it's not that high on my to-do list.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
  


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