LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Complete CCNA, CCNP & Red Hat Certification Training Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 09-16-2018, 04:29 AM   #1
turboscrew
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2009
Location: Nokia (town), Finland
Distribution: Mint, Debian, Puppy (Racy), Slackware
Posts: 580

Rep: Reputation: 46
Which filesystem type?


Usually whan I install a Linux distro, the installer suggests using ext4, but I recall seeing that ext3 might be better due to more (recovery)tools supporting it.
Is that still the case, or which one would you suggest?
 
Old 09-16-2018, 04:47 AM   #2
pan64
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2012
Location: Hungary
Distribution: debian/ubuntu/suse ...
Posts: 11,287

Rep: Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393Reputation: 3393
I would recommend you to use ext4 if <something else> was not explicitly written/specified.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-16-2018, 05:42 AM   #3
jsbjsb001
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2009
Location: Earth? I would say I hope so but I'm not so sure about that... I could just be a figment of your imagination too.
Distribution: CentOS at the time of this writing, but some others over the years too...
Posts: 1,767

Rep: Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848
Quote:
Originally Posted by pan64 View Post
I would recommend you to use ext4 if <something else> was not explicitly written/specified.
Same here. It's widely supported in Linux, can't see you having any issues. I've been using it for years and years now and never had any problem with it, unless the drive itself was failing.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-16-2018, 06:30 AM   #4
hydrurga
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Pictland
Distribution: Linux Mint 19 MATE
Posts: 5,917
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887Reputation: 1887
To confirm what the other posters are saying, use ext4. It's mature. In essence the difference between ext3 and ext4 is additional functionality in ext4 - they use the same driver for example.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-16-2018, 09:17 AM   #5
fatmac
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2011
Location: Upper Hale, Surrey/Hants Border, UK
Distribution: Tiny Core, Debian based (Raspbian, RasPiDeskop), & sometimes OpenBSD
Posts: 2,540

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
As above, ext4 is a step up from ext3, if you only have small disks/SDHC cards/pendrives, you could use ext2, (no recovery journal).
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-16-2018, 01:22 PM   #6
mrmazda
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2016
Location: USA
Distribution: openSUSE, Debian, Knoppix, Mageia, Fedora, others
Posts: 600

Rep: Reputation: 169Reputation: 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by turboscrew View Post
Usually whan I install a Linux distro, the installer suggests using ext4, but I recall seeing that ext3 might be better due to more (recovery)tools supporting it.
Still technically true about the tools, but not likely important unless you are wedded to old versions of recovery media and tools.
Quote:
Is that still the case, or which one would you suggest?
https://kernelnewbies.org/Ext4 makes it pretty clear EXT4 is the way to go. There are reasons not to that it doesn't mention. One is that 64bit feature became default over two years ago, long before that page's last update. Some older tools and drivers don't support 64bit, among which Grub Legacy for those still wedded to its simplicity compared to Grub2, and/or its superior Gfxboot implementation. Debian's Grub Legacy (and all Debian derivations, such as Linuxmint and *buntu) doesn't support EXT4 at all. If your favorite or only available rescue media is older it could fail you when you need it most.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-16-2018, 03:46 PM   #7
turboscrew
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2009
Location: Nokia (town), Finland
Distribution: Mint, Debian, Puppy (Racy), Slackware
Posts: 580

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 46
I'm mostly using Debian and Mint... and all my machines use MBR...

Last edited by turboscrew; 09-16-2018 at 03:48 PM.
 
Old 09-16-2018, 04:15 PM   #8
Habitual
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Jan 2011
Location: Yawnstown, Ohio
Distribution: High Sierra
Posts: 9,222
Blog Entries: 37

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I suggest gpt, grub2, and ext4
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-16-2018, 04:44 PM   #9
wpeckham
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Location: Continental USA
Distribution: Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, RedHat, DSL, Puppy, CentOS, Knoppix, Mint-DE, Sparky, Vsido, tinycore, Q4OS
Posts: 2,705

Rep: Reputation: 1103Reputation: 1103Reputation: 1103Reputation: 1103Reputation: 1103Reputation: 1103Reputation: 1103Reputation: 1103Reputation: 1103
Unless you have a special/specific use case that recommends something else, stick with EXT4.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-16-2018, 08:26 PM   #10
frankbell
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mageia, and whatever VMs I happen to be playing with
Posts: 13,976
Blog Entries: 24

Rep: Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754Reputation: 3754
A web search for "ext3 ext4 compared" will turn up some useful (and some useless) articles and opinions.

ext4 has matured over the years, so it would be wise to note the date of any article.

I agree with the others. Use ext4.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-17-2018, 01:17 PM   #11
turboscrew
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2009
Location: Nokia (town), Finland
Distribution: Mint, Debian, Puppy (Racy), Slackware
Posts: 580

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 46
OK. From now on, ext4 it is.
Thank you all.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
changing file system type to another filesystem type,does it effect on data? janakiramulu Ubuntu 1 02-04-2011 01:58 AM
mandriva dual boot filesystem type unknown,partition type 0x7 llearner Linux - Newbie 2 01-24-2010 02:03 PM
Filesystem type is ext2fs, partition type 0x83 TONYSUCCAR Linux - Enterprise 2 08-13-2009 02:20 AM
filesystem type unknown, partition type 0x7 crazyface_juicebox Linux - General 1 02-11-2007 11:50 PM
root (hd 0,0)Filesystem type unknown, partition type 0x7chainloader +1 ece30675 Linux - Distributions 5 07-20-2004 09:04 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:11 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration