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Old 09-15-2018, 08:56 AM   #1
Chris.Bristol
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Desktop Seizes Up


Now I've realised that Unity has been dropped, I have gone back to Ubuntu which his now Gnome3. I've installed 18.04 on a dual 3.4GHz processor with 4GB of memory. (Due to a well-known BIOS bug only 3 1/4Gb shows.) I was previously on Ubuntu Budgie 18.04, which ran without any problems, but on Ubuntu (Gnome3) everything seizes up occasionally, most likely when I have a few windows and several Firefox tabs open. I suspect this is due to running out of memory, is this likely? I had heard that swap was now longer recommended on computers with 4GB+ of memory, so I didn't install any, but I am wondering whether this is not really true for Ubuntu - perhaps it needs a lot of memory. If that's the case I think I should re-install with 4GB swap. Am I right?
 
Old 09-15-2018, 09:34 AM   #2
flshope
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Everyone is saying that Ubuntu has dropped Unity. I just upgraded to Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS (i.e., not a clean re-install). On my 18.04, Unity is still available as a desktop choice at the log-on GUI. I have the basic Ubuntu, so I don't know if this is true for the other Ubuntu varieties or for clean installs.

Sorry, but I can't address your question about whether the swap space can cause a full machine crash. I have 8 GB RAM and 8 GB of swap, but the swap could be left over from 16.04. I haven't had any crashes so far. I do know other things (like graphics drivers, in my experience) can cause crashes. You might post more details about your machine.
 
Old 09-15-2018, 09:50 AM   #3
jsbjsb001
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From what I can see, you have not established whether the issue is a hardware or software issue. I must say based on the OP it could well be a hardware issue of some kind.

You should try and establish whether this issue is a hardware or software problem. Try other distributions on the same machine as "live" systems, and see if they have any of the same issues. Do some checks on hardware. You can use the smartctl command that might give you an idea on the health status of your drives. It's the numbers in the "RAW_VALUE" column that matter.

Type the following into a terminal;

Code:
smartctl -a /dev/sdX
You'll need to replace the "sdX" with the proper device file name for the drive(s) you need to test.

You can also use the command below to check for filesystem problems;

Code:
fsck
For more information on the "fsck" command, type the following into a terminal window

Code:
man fsck
 
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Old 09-15-2018, 11:22 AM   #4
flshope
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jsbjsb001:

Quote:
You can use the smartctl command that might give you an idea on the health status of your drives.
I don't find 'smartctl' in either the Ubuntu or Debian repositories. Is that perhaps a CentOS-peculiar command?
 
Old 09-15-2018, 11:25 AM   #5
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flshope View Post
jsbjsb001:
...
I don't find 'smartctl' in either the Ubuntu or Debian repositories. Is that perhaps a CentOS-peculiar command?
No, it's not a "CentOS-peculiar command". It's usually in a package called something similar to "smartmontools" and such.
 
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Old 09-15-2018, 01:28 PM   #6
flshope
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jsbjsb001: Found it. Thank you.
 
Old 09-15-2018, 03:17 PM   #7
Chris.Bristol
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To answer some questions:
Quote:
From what I can see, you have not established whether the issue is a hardware or software issue. I must say based on the OP it could well be a hardware issue of some kind.
In my original post I wrote: "I was previously on Ubuntu Budgie 18.04, which ran without any problems", so I consider that it is reasonable to conclude that there is nothing wrong with the processor, RAM or diskdrive.

Quote:
You might post more details about your machine.
In my original post I wrote: "I am using "a dual 3.4GHz processor with 4GB of memory". Is anything else important?

This video suggests that Ubuntu vanilla uses 465MiP more RAM than Ubuntu Budgie:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyNVpWyVP-M
Only a rough estimate obviously - Ubuntu vanilla 1300MiP, Ubuntu Budgie 865MiP. I think that may be relevant.

Last edited by Chris.Bristol; 09-15-2018 at 03:20 PM.
 
Old 09-15-2018, 03:41 PM   #8
ChuangTzu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris.Bristol View Post
To answer some questions:
In my original post I wrote: "I was previously on Ubuntu Budgie 18.04, which ran without any problems", so I consider that it is reasonable to conclude that there is nothing wrong with the processor, RAM or diskdrive.

In my original post I wrote: "I am using "a dual 3.4GHz processor with 4GB of memory". Is anything else important?

This video suggests that Ubuntu vanilla uses 465MiP more RAM than Ubuntu Budgie:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyNVpWyVP-M
Only a rough estimate obviously - Ubuntu vanilla 1300MiP, Ubuntu Budgie 865MiP. I think that may be relevant.
Gnome3 requires acceleration (3D) and it is very resource intensive, I believe Budgie is less intensive, so perhaps, your rig cannot handle how much of a beast Gnome3 has become. Try another DE.

Ref: https://unix.stackexchange.com/quest...eration#317790
https://askubuntu.com/questions/6508...-are-available
 
Old 09-15-2018, 05:46 PM   #9
syg00
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Adding swap doesn't require a re-install. Simply create a partition or a swap file and do a mkswap on it, then add it to fstab. There must be a bunch of how-to's on the web.
You need to check your logs for error messages to make sure you are chasing the correct problem. Not much point adding swap if it's a CPU problem. If budgie worked, why persist with gnome ?.
 
  


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