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View Poll Results: root or sudo?
root 13 50.00%
sudo 10 38.46%
Don't know 1 3.85%
Other (please specify in post) 2 7.69%
Voters: 26. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-12-2018, 08:44 AM   #46
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lazydog View Post
Time to think outside the box.
Please don't be silly, I don't "stay in the box", and as I stated in post #1, I prefer root. As has been said, it's a personal choice.

Quote:
There are ways to run sudo commands without having to place sudo in front of them.
Yes, as other members have already stated...

Also, there is no such thing as a "sudo command" (except the "sudo command" itself of course), you use sudo to get root permissions for the command you wish to run with root permissions. You can still use any command that requires root permissions with sudo as far as I know.

Last edited by jsbjsb001; 10-12-2018 at 09:27 AM. Reason: addition and clarity
 
Old 10-12-2018, 12:24 PM   #47
lazydog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbjsb001 View Post
Please don't be silly, I don't "stay in the box", and as I stated in post #1, I prefer root. As has been said, it's a personal choice.
I guess as long as you are using the system for personal use logging in a root is acceptable. In a production environment .....

Quote:
Also, there is no such thing as a "sudo command" (except the "sudo command" itself of course), you use sudo to get root permissions for the command you wish to run with root permissions. You can still use any command that requires root permissions with sudo as far as I know.
When I wrote 'sudo commands' I was referring to any command you use 'sudo' with.
 
Old 10-12-2018, 12:30 PM   #48
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lazydog View Post
I guess as long as you are using the system for personal use logging in a root is acceptable. In a production environment .....
Well lazydog, funnily enough, I did speak about that issue here in this very thread. Just down from what you quoted from me above as it happens....

Quote:
When I wrote 'sudo commands' I was referring to any command you use 'sudo' with.
Fair enough.
 
Old 10-12-2018, 01:22 PM   #49
Myk267
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I think the only correct answer is to use sudo as root.
 
Old 10-13-2018, 03:23 AM   #50
ondoho
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i recently installed debian proper (stretch from a daily firware+XFCE .iso), and the installer gave me the choice between setting a root password or not.
iirc it specifically mentioned that if i don't, sudo will be set up for my user account.
 
Old 10-13-2018, 08:34 AM   #51
BW-userx
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lets go back to the beginning of Linux/GNU (before Slackware was around even?) was there always a root account? does Unix always have a root account, being that Linux is styled after it. would that not be the norm, and sense then it has been deviated from the norm. Perhaps due to the amount of users now using Linux/GNU, the other ones think its best they do not allow them the same rights and privileges they had when they started using Linux/GNU, that being a root account then having to learn how to use it properly.

Is this removal of knowledge, or the hiding of things needed to be used to try and protect others from the truth?

When all man wants is the truth. The truth about Linux and root, you cannot completely remove it from the system and expect it to run properly. you cannot completely remove it from the system and expect anything to get done.

It needs root, and them that use Linux to know how to use root. That is part of the system, it comes with it, the responsibility to learn how to use root if you're going to be running the OS goes to the user that is going to be installing and using it, not the ones that are giving it away, or selling, or providing it to others.

that is why su and su - was implemented so one is not always in the root account, but limited to a shell in a terminal eliminator.

then came sudo, the sudoers file is set up like it is so root (user admin dude or dudette) can delegate root privileges to others using sudo. Their should only be one or two, in case of death of the one of them that have the root password. the other users of same said system can use sudo.

If one is a home user then of course they then should know that they have to take on the responsibility to learn power that root has to the system they've decided to learn how to use. Then along with everything else they want to learn how to with, and on Linux/GNU, knowing how to deal with and use root ( su and su - as well) is just one of them. Because it is part of the Operating System.

why are them that are the "powers that be" the distribute Linux/GNU removing the same thing they know how to do, so it prevents, and or hinder others from learning the same?

controlling the masses egotistical ideology thinking they know whats best for others, dictatorship like ways?

Last edited by BW-userx; 10-13-2018 at 08:56 AM.
 
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Old 10-13-2018, 07:28 PM   #52
YesItsMe
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Most of my operating systems don't even have sudo. If I have to perform administrative tasks (e.g. installing global stuff), I usually use the particular system's sudo thingy (mostly, doas or pfexec) because everything else would confuse my $PATH, making my life unnecessarily complicated. I do have two old servers with a "root login" though. One of them will be replaced soon.
 
  


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