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Old 06-13-2018, 01:02 PM   #1
DennyY
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Question E-mail server for Linux newbie


Hello,

Can you guys suggest an e-mail server (for a Linux newbie) that I can install on my DHCP server, so I can monitor, and learn from it?

Thanks,
Denny
 
Old 06-13-2018, 01:41 PM   #2
YesItsMe
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OpenSMTPd (out) and Dovecot (in).
 
Old 06-13-2018, 01:55 PM   #3
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DennyY View Post
Can you guys suggest an e-mail server (for a Linux newbie) that I can install on my DHCP server, so I can monitor, and learn from it?
Hi,


Which do you want to monitor? The DHCP server, or an e-mail server? Because if you wish to use an e-mail server to monitor the DHCP server, then it would seem to be a totally different question.


What exactly are you considering?


Small Note: Not all LQ members are guys.
 
Old 06-14-2018, 03:07 AM   #4
X-LFS-2010
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setting up a mail SERVER (as opposed to reading and sending mail - read help in your mail app) is not for newbies - it's complicated and can impact OTHER mail servers (and in some areas is simply dis-allowed)

(infact, something like exim allows remote users to send special mail to "root" your server unless configured to such a point that is rediculous)


your system doesn't need mail for any reason: I suggest not running a mail server at all - not even a local mail server. in the early 90's mail was used for some system administration: but it isn't anymore.
 
Old 06-14-2018, 03:19 AM   #5
YesItsMe
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E-mail is still the least insane way to retrieve notifications.
 
Old 06-14-2018, 10:01 AM   #6
DennyY
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E-mail server

Hi,

Sorry, I shouldn't used the word "monitor".

My question was is there an e-mail server that I can TRY to install myself. But people suggest that setting up an e-mail server is not for newbies. So one thing at a time

Best Regards,
Denny






Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
Hi,


Which do you want to monitor? The DHCP server, or an e-mail server? Because if you wish to use an e-mail server to monitor the DHCP server, then it would seem to be a totally different question.


What exactly are you considering?


Small Note: Not all LQ members are guys.
 
Old 06-14-2018, 10:14 AM   #7
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DennyY View Post
Hi,

Sorry, I shouldn't used the word "monitor".

My question was is there an e-mail server that I can TRY to install myself. But people suggest that setting up an e-mail server is not for newbies. So one thing at a time

Best Regards,
Denny
I would say that if you have a private network, which is isolated from the internet and and ISP. Or you just unplug from any routers and only plug two computers into each other, then you can stage something like that.


Yes, it is not a trivial thing to do. The points of others are that if you set up an email server while attached to your ISP, it can be disruptive and also seen by your ISP as an interfering problem, where they may block you or already have blocks in place to inhibit you from using their provided network from accomplishing server, "through" their network.


What I would suggest is that you start a thread in the Linux Server forum, once you've done some research about email servers and how to set them up, and ask some further questions about the topic.
 
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Old 06-14-2018, 10:19 AM   #8
DennyY
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e-mail server

Thanks for the info.

You have been a great help,
Denny




Quote:
Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
I would say that if you have a private network, which is isolated from the internet and and ISP. Or you just unplug from any routers and only plug two computers into each other, then you can stage something like that.


Yes, it is not a trivial thing to do. The points of others are that if you set up an email server while attached to your ISP, it can be disruptive and also seen by your ISP as an interfering problem, where they may block you or already have blocks in place to inhibit you from using their provided network from accomplishing server, "through" their network.


What I would suggest is that you start a thread in the Linux Server forum, once you've done some research about email servers and how to set them up, and ask some further questions about the topic.
 
Old 06-14-2018, 07:58 PM   #9
frankbell
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If you want a full email server, take a look at exim. I understand that it's not quite the beast that sendmail is.

I'd suggest though, that you start in the direction that YesItsMe suggested. Learn how to use a command line email client, such as Mutt. In doing so, you will learn how to use MTAs (Mail Transport Agents), MPA to send and receive mail, MDAs (Mail Delivery Agents), and MUAs (Mail User Agents) to read it and send it.

The Arch Wiki has a good article on Mutt: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/mutt

After you master that, you would be ready to move to configuring a server. However, check your ISP's terms of service first; many ISPs, at least in the U. S., prohibit public-facing servers on less than business-level accounts.

Last edited by frankbell; 06-14-2018 at 08:03 PM.
 
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