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Old 08-02-2020, 11:36 AM   #16
beachboy2
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vanmoi,

I second Hermaniís advice to leave W10 on the existing drive and install Linux on the new SSD. It is simpler in my opinion, plus it keeps the two operating systems completely separate.

Follow the tutorial here:
https://askubuntu.com/questions/7269...te-hard-drives

1. Using GParted, format the new SSD as GPT.
Open GParted and delete all partitions.
Click on Apply > Device > select Create a new partition table > select gpt.

2. Create a fat32 esp (EFi System Partition) partition (500MiB), click on Apply. Leave the remainder of the drive as unallocated.

3. Next and most importantly, right-click on the fat32 partition > Manage flags > Select boot and esp.

Close GParted, shut down the computer, remove the GParted Live media.

4. Use the Linux Mint, or other, installer to create the other partitions after selecting Something else.

Recommended primary partition sizes:
The 1st partition (esp) should be about 500MiB, formatted as FAT32 and flagged as boot and esp.
The 2nd partition (root) should be about 25000MiB, formatted as ext4 with mount point / (root).
The 3rd partition (swap) should be say, 2048MiB, used as swap.
The 4th partition (home) would be the remainder of the drive, formatted as ext4 with mount point /home.
 
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Old 08-02-2020, 04:34 PM   #17
Hermani
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
(..) repeatedly ASKED YOU what didn't match (..) they DID support Linux(..) you DO have UEFI, but AGAIN, the installer detects (..)
No offence, TB0ne, please don't let the OP have your blood pressure spike too high we all need you in LQ
 
Old 08-02-2020, 04:39 PM   #18
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermani View Post
No offence, TB0ne, please don't let the OP have your blood pressure spike too high we all need you in LQ
None taken, but I don't ever get angry or upset here, and rarely in 'real life'. The OP's behavior in their last couple of threads isn't a good indication that a successful dual-boot will happen.

Past that, OP...why do you want to use Linux at all?? What's the goal of this exercise?? If you're not willing to learn new things, or engage in conversation to work through your problems, it may be best for you to stick with Windows.
 
Old 08-03-2020, 02:10 AM   #19
des_a
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I agree with TB0ne.

Quote:
What's the goal of this exercise?? If you're not willing to learn new things, or engage in conversation to work through your problems, it may be best for you to stick with Windows.
As for the portioning... I find that depends on the specific distro and version you use and have. It also depends upon the kernel version you installed, but mostly the distro, because it's the system as a whole. I believe Ubuntu needed 12GB minimum for the / partition.

Which partitions? I recommend these:

Code:
/ / Root
/home /home Home
SWAP SWAP Swap
That's the way I usually partition.

Also, you can install Windows drivers for Linux filesystems, but I'm not sure where to get the newest versions.
 
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