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2020 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards This forum is for the 2020 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards.
You can now vote for your favorite projects/products of 2020. This is your chance to be heard! Voting ends on February 17th.


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View Poll Results: Database of the Year
DB2 0 0%
Firebird 2 0.91%
MariaDB 117 53.18%
MySQL 17 7.73%
Oracle 2 0.91%
Percona 1 0.45%
PostgreSQL 50 22.73%
sqlite 29 13.18%
SQL Server 2 0.91%
Voters: 220. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-03-2021, 01:55 AM   #16
danblack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldleviathan View Post
Do any of these work with arm64 on a raspberry pi 4?
MariaDB has amd64 support.
 
Old 02-03-2021, 01:56 AM   #17
danblack
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Hi Tux,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tux! View Post
It also has the worst defaults of all databases I ever worked with, making it extremely hard to migrate existing databases from Windows to Linux or HP-UX.
I'm struggling to understand how defaults relate to migration (sql_mode?). Do you have time to provide me with more details? Which source databases do you consider here?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tux! View Post
It also has the worst possible user-management options, which makes me stay away from it as long as possible. dbeaver helps, but still.
If dbeaver (feature request 10070) exposed the roles functionality that has been there since 10.0.5 would this be acceptable?

Other notable user-management options that have existed for a while, that can easily get missed are: account locking was added in 10.4.2 and password expiry in 10.4.3. The SUPER privilege was split up in 10.5.2.

With these it looks almost comparable to Postgres in terms of user management features. Or have I missed a key feature that still is required?
 
Old 02-03-2021, 03:59 AM   #18
Tux!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danblack View Post
I'm struggling to understand how defaults relate to migration (sql_mode?). Do you have time to provide me with more details? Which source databases do you consider here?
1. On windows file names are case insensative and tables are created the way the user used capitalisation on typing the "create table" SQL command. I've seen more than once that migration to file systems that are not case insensative will FAIL on the ANSI standard the typing table names in SQL commands is ought to be case insensative does not work. Likewise for compiled programs that use all lowercase vs all uppercase in SQL commands.

2. The default installation for mysql was (and I fear still is) prohibits spaces on places that will make end users curse: "select count (*) from foo;" is (was) not allowed in a default installation. (a space between count and (*)). This is for all functions.

So I need to add two lines to /etc/my.cnf to be able to work with MySQL/MariaDB at all

sql_mode=NO_ENGINE_SUBSTITUTION,STRICT_TRANS_TABLES,IGNORE_SPACE
lower_case_table_names=1

Easy on my own boxes, but not on servers or other peoples boxes

Quote:
Originally Posted by danblack View Post
If dbeaver (feature request 10070) exposed the roles functionality that has been there since 10.0.5 would this be acceptable?

Other notable user-management options that have existed for a while, that can easily get missed are: account locking was added in 10.4.2 and password expiry in 10.4.3. The SUPER privilege was split up in 10.5.2.

With these it looks almost comparable to Postgres in terms of user management features. Or have I missed a key feature that still is required?
I *LOVE* DBeaver! It takes away most of my user-management issues for MySQL and Oracle.
Thanks for the extra links, I'm going to store them in my mysql notes
 
Old 02-03-2021, 09:31 PM   #19
acgx
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Registered: Jul 2014
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Maria
 
Old 02-03-2021, 09:52 PM   #20
gus3
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I vote SQLite, simply because it works out of the box, for all users. No admin privs required, no network setup, it just works.
 
Old 02-05-2021, 08:50 AM   #21
Pagonis
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Registered: Dec 2007
Location: Lithuania
Distribution: macOS on M1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YesItsMe View Post
For embedded systems, SQLite is hard to beat. If actual database servers are involved, PostgreSQL is the clear winner in terms of features, scalability, price (sorry Oracle) and performance. I'll choose PostgreSQL because it's what I use the most right now.
PostgreSQL and performance in one sentence? Very cool. Performance is better than in 9.X versions, but query optimizer is still pretty primitive, at least compared to MS SQL Server. On SQL Server I write my query however and it's fast. On PostgreSQL - write however and it's slow, so then google, ask around for every trick imaginable - way faster than initial quickly written query, still slower than SQL Server.

Last edited by Pagonis; 02-05-2021 at 09:48 AM.
 
Old 02-07-2021, 12:16 PM   #22
YesItsMe
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You can even write inefficient code in Assembly... ;-)
 
Old 02-09-2021, 04:42 AM   #23
actionhanky
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Registered: Feb 2021
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MariaDB
 
Old 02-09-2021, 12:00 PM   #24
gadnium
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Registered: Feb 2021
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Gotta vote for MariaDB
 
Old 02-17-2021, 06:56 AM   #25
Sgi
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Registered: Feb 2019
Location: France
Distribution: Debian
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Smile MariaDB agree

Quote:
Originally Posted by wagnerbianchi View Post
MariaDB.
Yes agree MariaDB
 
Old 02-17-2021, 11:33 PM   #26
danblack
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Registered: Feb 2021
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Distribution: Fedora
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danblack View Post
MariaDB has amd64 support.
Blah, meant to say arm64 support. And armhf/armel are packaged by Debian and others.
 
Old 02-18-2021, 01:06 AM   #27
dr-m
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Registered: Jan 2020
Posts: 5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by danblack View Post
Blah, meant to say arm64 support. And armhf/armel are packaged by Debian and others.
Not all ARMv8 (Aarch64) are created equal. All currently supported MariaDB server releases should work on the Raspberry Pi. Early 10.5 releases crashed on 64-bit Raspberry Pi models, but that was addressed by https://github.com/MariaDB/server/pull/1645.
 
  


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