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Old 05-21-2018, 11:07 PM   #1
cs13
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Recent changes to system programming


Hi,

I have been doing system programming in the past, before 2014. I found Linux system programming by Robert Love as a good reference then. At present, with the changes in Kernel and the associated libraries, I am not sure what I can consider as an authentic system programming reference for the industry! I was not updating myself with the later changes. I am not looking for beginner's stuffs, manuals or tutorials.

I am looking for a concise answer that defines the conceptual changes between system programming prior 2014(Linux kernel 3.x and corresponding glibcs) and the recent stable versions. Please help.
 
Old 05-23-2018, 04:01 PM   #2
AwesomeMachine
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The only thing I could find was a course from linux.com, at a cost of 3,000.00USD. https://training.linuxfoundation.org...nd-development
 
Old 05-23-2018, 08:27 PM   #3
cs13
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The only thing I could find was a course from linux.com, at a cost of 3,000.00USD. https://training.linuxfoundation.org...nd-development
Thanks for the response. But, I am looking for the key changes or developments in system programming from Linux 3.2 kernel & corresponding glibc to Linux 4 kernel and corresponding glibc, to be more precise.
 
Old 05-23-2018, 10:00 PM   #4
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I doubt you'll find anything relevant - as soon as it's written it's out of date, same as the books. Most of the APIs' current functions are left intact, but may be extended at any point in time.
That leaves you with the kernel changelog - and given they build on each other you'll have to read them all in order. kernelnewbies publish a very good synopsis for each kernel released.
 
Old 05-23-2018, 10:08 PM   #5
cs13
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Originally Posted by syg00 View Post
I doubt you'll find anything relevant - as soon as it's written it's out of date, same as the books. Most of the APIs' current functions are left intact, but may be extended at any point in time.
That leaves you with the kernel changelog - and given they build on each other you'll have to read them all in order. kernelnewbies publish a very good synopsis for each kernel released.
Thanks for the response. Kernel long term releases comes out in every few years. Only the major bug fixes are applied to such trees and those are the ones usually I've seen being used in industrial projects. Most of the fixes for kernel internals won't change much for a system level programmer.
 
Old 05-26-2018, 12:18 AM   #6
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Every so often someone will write a great book that's up-to-date. But it's only happened 2 or 3 times in the history of Linux. Perhaps you could elaborate on exactly what you're referring to as 'system programming', if not kernel and related development.
 
Old 05-26-2018, 04:11 AM   #7
cs13
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Originally Posted by AwesomeMachine View Post
Every so often someone will write a great book that's up-to-date. But it's only happened 2 or 3 times in the history of Linux. Perhaps you could elaborate on exactly what you're referring to as 'system programming', if not kernel and related development.
Thanks for the reply. Yes, I can make it more clear. By system programming I mean the system calls exposed by the kernel to user space or the glibc calls provided for interaction with the kernel. So, it includes the developments in the kernel internals which have any direct effect on user space programming. By that I don't mean all the changes, rather the major ones from 3.2 to 4.x (and the corresponding glibc). Hope it is clear now

Last edited by cs13; 05-26-2018 at 04:12 AM.
 
  


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