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Old 02-26-2019, 10:28 AM   #1
slcklnx
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build the kernel


I have 256 + 128 megabytes of memory and a Pentium 3 processor . shake with kernel.org 4.20 kernel . oldconfig will not be used. so please tell me what to turn on when building and what to turn off in the kernel to the Pentium processor worked correctly? do I need pae?
 
Old 02-26-2019, 10:45 AM   #2
trite
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I guess you can google your processor model and look it up if you need pae or not, physical adress extension is listed in features if I remember correctly

Try by just choosing the defaults and see what gives? or google everything when the wizard asks you if you want to enable/disable something

tbh I just hold Enter until it stops asking questions and then rebuild later if I need something

*edit*
also, this:
https://docs.slackware.com/howtos:sl...kernelbuilding
Code:
#config in ncurses gui
make menuconfig
#config in X gui
make xconfig
and read the descriptions, compare it with the generic default, google it and make your decision

Last edited by trite; 02-26-2019 at 10:52 AM.
 
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Old 02-26-2019, 11:07 AM   #3
bassmadrigal
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The Pentium III should support PAE, but based on your specs, you don't really need it. PAE is designed to allow your system to use more than 4GB of RAM.

But considering there's thousands of kernel options (the config provided by Pat for his 4.19.x kernels contains over 8000 options), it's hard to know what would be best for your system.

Why don't you want to use oldconfig? Most of the time it is better to use a base config and then tweak as needed. So, my suggestion would be to use Pat's config and then removing options that you know won't apply to your system.
 
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Old 02-26-2019, 11:15 AM   #4
montagdude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bassmadrigal View Post
Why don't you want to use oldconfig? Most of the time it is better to use a base config and then tweak as needed. So, my suggestion would be to use Pat's config and then removing options that you know won't apply to your system.
Or, for a minimal kernel, run `make localmodconfig` and then tack on additional things you may need. Be sure to plug in any peripherals you want support for before doing this to ensure those kernel modules are loaded.

Edit: this is assuming you are able to boot from an existing kernel and you just wish to trim it down.

Last edited by montagdude; 02-26-2019 at 11:17 AM.
 
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Old 02-26-2019, 12:05 PM   #5
slcklnx
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Talking

ok
 
Old 02-26-2019, 12:07 PM   #6
enorbet
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Although I started with operating systems in which it was desirable and sometimes required to manually assign IRQ, DMA, etc for a wide array of hardware and have built a custom kernel in Linux for roughly 20 years, I am far more a "hardware guy" than a "software guy". Much of the reason that it used to be required to set such low-level attributes was that what came to be called "Plug 'n Play" was not possible given how much information could practically be stored in Firmware, especially permanent memory like CMOS/BIOS. That changed over time and for example I haven't forced an IRQ in over a decade, but I still build a custom kernel even though since on-demand module loading became a reality that practice has vastly reduced needs. In fact I haven't even seen the word "PlugNPlay" in print for a very long time. It's become a given.

Slcklnx how this applies to you is that you really don't actually need to build a custom kernel at all but I think it can be a great lesson to do so. As for value there are only a few settings that have any very noticeable value and almost all of the are in the "Processor Type and Features" section. If you have a running kernel and use some means, like make oldconfig" (others are mentioned in this thread and also in documentation) really that's the only area in which you are likely to feel any improvement, if even then. The only other area where you might enjoy an improvement is activating your file system as a "built-in" kernel module instead of a loadable module so you don't have to even mess with an initrd at all.

I have to mention that I don't think you have done nearly enough research into all that building a kernel entails or you would already know what PAE is and what it's limitations are. I mentioned that I am a "hardware guy" exactly for the reason to tell you that there are so many chipsets listed for support or not that as much as I know about the PCs I custom build, choosing every part, there are still chips for some functions on my mobo and peripherals (or might be added in the future) that I have no idea what they are so I'm forced to only disable the ones I'm sure of. This can be very confusing and even a bit daunting.

So practically speaking it is my recommendation first that you research kernel building a bit more, start with a working kernel, run something like "make oldconfig" and only change processor type and file system support and leave the rest alone as default. Any improvement in performance you will feel will be vastly less than what you can buy with well under 100 bux in newer hardware, especially RAM. These days having less than 1-2GB RAM is a huge constraint. Given your apparent knowledge of the process I'll venture a guess that you will spend well in excess of 20 hours building a first custom kernel that makes you at all pleased. I will further guess that 20 hours might net you in excess of 100 bux.... catch my drift?

Edit: I should add that over time custom kernel building time will drop by an order of magnitude but that, too, is affected by processor and RAM. On a Pentium III with under 0.5GB RAM the build alone, after you have a proper config ("make bzImage&&make modules&&make modules_install"), that will likely take a good 2 hours, and then you will still have to enable the kernel in your bootloader.

Last edited by enorbet; 02-26-2019 at 12:22 PM.
 
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Old 02-26-2019, 12:25 PM   #7
slcklnx
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just one more question when I do make menuconfig is it not equivalent to make localmodconfig? or Vice versa, make menuconfig is the maximum of inclusions, and make localmodconfig is the minimum of inclusions?
 
Old 02-26-2019, 12:30 PM   #8
slcklnx
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guys, I don't convert watches to bucks. I just do what I like. Linux is not a business for me, it's a hobby. the core is trying to collect in order to have at least some idea about Linux. I do not expect any performance increase from the kernel build. I have fujitsu. he has a lot to do with it. with him I passed a lot in the literal sense. on it and d to collect. just because I want to. Thank you very much
 
Old 02-26-2019, 12:37 PM   #9
montagdude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slcklnx View Post
just one more question when I do make menuconfig is it not equivalent to make localmodconfig? or Vice versa, make menuconfig is the maximum of inclusions, and make localmodconfig is the minimum of inclusions?
make localmodconfig will create a minimal config just with the modules currently loaded, disabling any unneeded options.

make menuconfig is an ncurses user interface to edit the config file. It will not actually change anything unless you edit an option and save.

See: https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux...fs/tags/v4.3.3

PS I just noticed the makerandconfig option. That sounds like a fun one.

Last edited by montagdude; 02-26-2019 at 12:40 PM.
 
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Old 02-26-2019, 01:00 PM   #10
rogan
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I'd recommend a localyesconfig, starting from a generic kernel, no point in not building in stuff that's needed for your computer to function correctly.
Don't forget to also add support for usb devices you might come to use (printers mass storage...) and cdrom, dvd file systems
also fat, ext2 and maybe ntfs. Building a minimal kernel can be quite a challenge, but it's also fun, well maybe not on a pIII;
You're going to have wait a looong long time for that compile to complete if you want to try something new.

Last edited by rogan; 02-26-2019 at 01:01 PM.
 
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Old 02-26-2019, 01:27 PM   #11
slcklnx
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make menuconfig is an ncurses user interface to edit the config file. It will not actually change anything unless you edit an option and save.



Oк. but the question is different. when I make make menuconfig something is already on hard and something is modular. what is it based on? for example, some network cards are already included modularly. and some tough. why isn't everything turned off? what is it based on?
 
Old 02-26-2019, 01:43 PM   #12
montagdude
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slcklnx View Post
make menuconfig is an ncurses user interface to edit the config file. It will not actually change anything unless you edit an option and save.



Oк. but the question is different. when I make make menuconfig something is already on hard and something is modular. what is it based on? for example, some network cards are already included modularly. and some tough. why isn't everything turned off? what is it based on?
It's based on the contents of the .config file in the kernel source directory. If there isn't one there, then I guess it's probably based on the defaults that the developers have set.
 
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Old 02-26-2019, 01:59 PM   #13
slcklnx
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probably we are close to the answer. .config contains the maximum required for the kernel or the minimum required?
 
Old 02-26-2019, 02:07 PM   #14
montagdude
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Ok, clearly we need to start over, because your question doesn't make sense.

.config is the master file containing the options used to build the kernel. When you run make localmodconfig, it will create a brand-new .config file with only the modules enabled that are loaded on your system at that time. When you run make menuconfig, the options in the user interface will be populated based on what is present in the .config file. At that point, you have the ability to edit options and overwrite .config. But in general, .config may contain any combination of settings imaginable -- none enabled, all enabled, or anything in between.

Last edited by montagdude; 02-26-2019 at 02:09 PM.
 
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Old 02-26-2019, 03:14 PM   #15
slcklnx
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I'm sorry, but I want to understand. when I just installed Slackware, I did nothing, I didn’t run anything.

Will it be contained in .config? Is it in the newly installed system? how and by whom is this config created?
 
  


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