LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > Programming
User Name
Password
Programming This forum is for all programming questions.
The question does not have to be directly related to Linux and any language is fair game.

Notices


View Poll Results: What was your first programming language?
Assembly 45 7.88%
C 24 4.20%
C++ 18 3.15%
C# 2 0.35%
COBOL 18 3.15%
Common Lisp 0 0%
Erlang 0 0%
Fortran 116 20.32%
Go 0 0%
Haskell 0 0%
Java 8 1.40%
Javascript 3 0.53%
Objective-C 0 0%
Perl 9 1.58%
PHP 5 0.88%
Python 14 2.45%
Ruby 1 0.18%
Rust 1 0.18%
Swift 0 0%
Other (Let us know in this thread) 70 12.26%
BASIC 209 36.60%
Pascal 28 4.90%
Voters: 571. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 01-18-2021, 04:01 PM   #376
MichaelKornby
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
First programming language


It was Assembler on a UNIVAC 1108 at the Institue of Technology in Lund, Sweden. Later FORTRAN and ALGOL on the same machine. I hate punch cards.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-26-2021, 09:36 PM   #377
baumei
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2019
Location: USA; North Carolina
Distribution: Slackware 14.2
Posts: 212

Rep: Reputation: 71
The first programming language I learned was a variety of FORTRAN called WATFIV. Early in the course we had to learn to run the card-punch machines.

It was suggested, but not required, that one may wish to number the cards so that if the 'deck' was ever dropped, then it would not be difficult to put the cards back in order. Also, it was suggested that the numbering for the first deck of cards for one's program be: 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and so on. The gaps between the initial card numbers were so that if one needed to modify the program, one could re-punch/renumber relatively few cards around where the new cards were to be inserted (while reducing the gap-size), instead of re-punching every card after the insertion in order to fix the card numbering.

The final 'exam' for the course was to write a program to do a specified task. Back then, it was considered important to not use lots of memory and/or processor cycles --- so, if the student's program used more RAM or more processor cycles than the professor's solution, then a penalty was to be calculated and deducted from the grade. I still remember that I got 105 on the final exam, because my program used less memory and fewer cycles than the professor's solution, and also gave the proper output. :-)
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-27-2021, 01:54 AM   #378
AnanthaP
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Chennai, India
Posts: 942

Rep: Reputation: 216Reputation: 216Reputation: 216
Quote:
It was suggested, but not required, that one may wish to number the cards so that if the 'deck' was ever dropped, then it would not be difficult to put the cards back in order. Also, it was suggested that the numbering for the first deck of cards for one's program be: 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and so on. The gaps between the initial card numbers were so that if one needed to modify the program, one could re-punch/renumber relatively few cards around where the new cards were to be inserted (while reducing the gap-size), instead of re-punching every card after the insertion in order to fix the card numbering.
Same thing held true for the IBM 1401 system that was one of my earlier machines. Not just "dropped" but even jammed and mangled inside the computer. When this happened, we had to put off the machine, manually pull out the mangled card hoping that you don't damage the sensor brush (960 per head), rekey the card contents (hope that there's no mistake) and feed it in again. Mind you, it's not just programmes but data as well.

AP
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-27-2021, 04:08 AM   #379
igadoter
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: wroclaw, poland
Distribution: many, primary Slackware
Posts: 1,821
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Pascal by Niklaus Wirth. Good to recall the person. Did a lot of good stuff.

Last edited by igadoter; 01-27-2021 at 04:10 AM.
 
Old 01-27-2021, 12:45 PM   #380
monarchi
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2016
Distribution: Linux Mint 17.3 Rosa
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
A long time ago. :-)

Almost 60 years ago I learned to program in 4-address machine code on a LGP-30 computer. It had a rotating magnetic drum with 4K locations. We put the instructions in non-sequential locations to take into account the rotational latency of the drum and the execution time of the instruction. :-) The article in Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGP-30) describes the machine. However my memory doesn't include the ACT-III language described in the article. Age may have distorted what I recall. :-)

Regardless, I thought Fortran II was a vast improvement when it came out. Since that time I have programmed in many, many languages on machines ranging from IBM, CDC, Burroughs, and DEC to my current home-built Ryzen dual boot Windows and Linux machine. My favorite languages are Smalltalk (on a "real" Smalltalk machine) and Scheme -> Common Lisp. But for practical reasons, most of my code now is in Python.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-27-2021, 02:08 PM   #381
eight.bit.al
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2015
Location: Prison
Distribution: a new distro every day
Posts: 51

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Plugboard Programming. Does this count?


http://www.righto.com/2017/04/1950s-...plugboard.html

8bit
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	plugboard.jpg
Views:	12
Size:	126.7 KB
ID:	35395  
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-27-2021, 02:38 PM   #382
hazel
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2016
Location: Harrow, UK
Distribution: LFS, AntiX, Slackware
Posts: 5,191
Blog Entries: 14

Rep: Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000
That is absolutely amazing! I never heard of things like that before. It reminds me a bit of Babbage's Analytical Engine which, if it had been built, would probably have been the world's first computer.

Another parallel which comes to mind is a modern spreadsheet program like calc.

Last edited by hazel; 01-27-2021 at 02:53 PM.
 
Old 01-27-2021, 02:45 PM   #383
igadoter
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: wroclaw, poland
Distribution: many, primary Slackware
Posts: 1,821
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
My next program will be your plugboard account calculator. Good point is it won't be as heavy as real plugboard.
 
Old 01-27-2021, 09:25 PM   #384
masterclassic
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2007
Distribution: Knoppix
Posts: 228

Rep: Reputation: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by baumei View Post
It was suggested, but not required, that one may wish to number the cards so that if the 'deck' was ever dropped, then it would not be difficult to put the cards back in order. Also, it was suggested that the numbering for the first deck of cards for one's program be: 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and so on. The gaps between the initial card numbers were so that if one needed to modify the program, one could re-punch/renumber relatively few cards around where the new cards were to be inserted (while reducing the gap-size), instead of re-punching every card after the insertion in order to fix the card numbering.
I remember now this card numbering, in the last few columns of the cards. Columns 1-5 were for the labels, and column 6 (if used) marked that the line content was appended to the previous card content.
All this for the program code. Data cards were another story, as well as control cards
 
Old 01-28-2021, 04:49 AM   #385
hazel
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2016
Location: Harrow, UK
Distribution: LFS, AntiX, Slackware
Posts: 5,191
Blog Entries: 14

Rep: Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000Reputation: 3000
Quote:
Originally Posted by masterclassic View Post
I remember now this card numbering, in the last few columns of the cards. Columns 1-5 were for the labels, and column 6 (if used) marked that the line content was appended to the previous card content.
That was a Fortran rule. Fortran IV if I remember correctly.
 
Old 01-28-2021, 05:31 AM   #386
scasey
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Feb 2013
Location: Tucson, AZ, USA
Distribution: CentOS 7.8.2003
Posts: 5,369

Rep: Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006Reputation: 2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by eight.bit.al View Post
Plugboard Programming. Does this count?
http://www.righto.com/2017/04/1950s-...plugboard.html
8bit
Oh! I forgot about that! IBM PCAM (Punch Card Accounting Machine). 1966-67 I was a keypunch operator, but did get to do a little of that programming...qualified me to be an “operator” in a PCAM shop a couple years later.

I was at an Air National Guard unit (Wyoming) The operator job was at Commercial Business Services (CBSj in Long Beach, CA...school daytime, work swing shift.. Saying “l work at CBS” was fun at parties, but never really got me anywhere...

I was able to say later that I learned logic on a punch board...

(I can’t change my vote to Other...)

Last edited by scasey; 01-28-2021 at 05:48 AM.
 
Old 01-28-2021, 08:44 AM   #387
masterclassic
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2007
Distribution: Knoppix
Posts: 228

Rep: Reputation: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
That was a Fortran rule. Fortran IV if I remember correctly.
That's true. It was the fortran format. I learned it by reading some computer books of my father's (he was architect, he did his studies in the 50s but he went back to university in the 70s for further studies, and then he took a computer course too). Of course, I didn't have access to any computer at the time. A few years later, as an engineering student, I took my first computer class, fortran IV too, and that early knowledge helped me to progress faster than other students in class. It seems that fortran IV remained in use for many years in engineering calculations, because there were many big programs already tested and running. I never used fortran myself since mid 90s, and I think actual versions are very different than those old versions.
 
Old 01-28-2021, 08:52 AM   #388
danielbmartin
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Location: Apex, NC, USA
Distribution: Mint 17.3
Posts: 1,808

Rep: Reputation: 637Reputation: 637Reputation: 637Reputation: 637Reputation: 637Reputation: 637
Quote:
Originally Posted by eight.bit.al View Post
Plugboard Programming.
A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, I was employed by a large (but fading) technology company. I learned to use (and love) a mainframe language called CMS Pipelines which had a wonderful feature called 407 Emulation.

Daniel B. Martin

.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-28-2021, 10:10 AM   #389
allend
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Melbourne
Distribution: Slackware-current
Posts: 5,518

Rep: Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117Reputation: 2117
Great thread Jeremy!
It has flushed a lot of lurkers, who obviously have a long history.
Unsurprisingly, my beginning was with BASIC on IBM and Apple IIe clones more or less in conjunction with assembly. Back then, writing your own assembler routines was encouraged.
 
Old 01-29-2021, 01:20 AM   #390
astrogeek
Moderator
 
Registered: Oct 2008
Distribution: Slackware [64]-X.{0|1|2|37|-current} ::12<=X<=14, FreeBSD_12{.0|.1}
Posts: 5,559
Blog Entries: 11

Rep: Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537Reputation: 3537
Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
That is absolutely amazing! I never heard of things like that before. It reminds me a bit of Babbage's Analytical Engine which, if it had been built, would probably have been the world's first computer.
Better late than never, I suppose!

The first complete Babbage Engine was completed in London in 2002, 153 years after it was designed. Difference Engine No. 2, built faithfully to the original drawings, consists of 8,000 parts, weighs five tons, and measures 11 feet long...
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: What was your first programming language? LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 08-19-2020 08:42 PM
LXer: Top 5: Your first programming language, running Windows apps on Linux, and more LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 09-03-2017 11:02 AM
LXer: What was your first programming language? LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 08-29-2017 06:30 AM
LXer: How to choose your first programming language LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 01-11-2017 02:31 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > Programming

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:08 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration