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View Poll Results: What was your first programming language?
Assembly 38 7.36%
C 21 4.07%
C++ 13 2.52%
C# 2 0.39%
COBOL 17 3.29%
Common Lisp 0 0%
Erlang 0 0%
Fortran 110 21.32%
Go 0 0%
Haskell 0 0%
Java 8 1.55%
Javascript 2 0.39%
Objective-C 0 0%
Perl 8 1.55%
PHP 4 0.78%
Python 12 2.33%
Ruby 1 0.19%
Rust 1 0.19%
Swift 0 0%
Other (Let us know in this thread) 69 13.37%
BASIC 189 36.63%
Pascal 21 4.07%
Voters: 516. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-19-2020, 05:44 PM   #346
teckk
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A chisel and a hammer. We did not have those new fangled things when we were young.

Quote:
Commodore 64 BASIC
I did ATARI basic. Had those cassettes that you plugged in.

A place where I worked was still using QB4.5 in 1995 for it's testing software, on dos 6.22 machines, running metrabyte 8 bit ISA cards.
 
Old 10-19-2020, 10:33 PM   #347
RoverDog
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Sinclair ZX Spectrum 48K Basic. Still have it somewhere in a box. Then Pick Basic and derivatives (OpenInsight R/Basic) that I still use today. After Sinclair Basic some Pascal and Assembler. Anybody here remember DOS Edlin editor? Today mostly embedded c/c++.
 
Old 10-20-2020, 05:19 AM   #348
hazel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoverDog View Post
Anybody here remember DOS Edlin editor?
I remember that it was a nightmare to use!

Later on, DOS had a program called edit (I think) with a TUI interface, something like ncurses provides on Linux.
 
Old 10-20-2020, 04:16 PM   #349
masterclassic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazel View Post
I remember that it was a nightmare to use!

Later on, DOS had a program called edit (I think) with a TUI interface, something like ncurses provides on Linux.
I didn't like edlin. As you write, it was a nightmare for something more than a few characters.

I really loved BRIEF editor, "Basic Reconfigurable Interactive Editing Facility". It had a limit or 2 billion lines, and this under msdos. It was used for software development, including the typing rules and syntax for many languages, a macro language for processing, you could compile the code with just a keystroke, get the error/warning list and run/debug the code from within the BRIEF environment. I often used it for post processing of lengthy output from calculating programs, and inserting formatting binary codes for the dot matrix printer. Very fast, very stable, great software.
 
Old 10-22-2020, 11:49 AM   #350
Sir Douglas
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My first programming course was BASIC with punched cards.
 
Old 10-30-2020, 11:43 AM   #351
Gerynar
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I started with Applesoft BASIC on our Apple //e. made simple games. seemed to always beat my brothers, until they typed my name when the game asked for our names, then I didn't win so much.
 
Old 10-31-2020, 12:59 AM   #352
Rich Strebendt
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Quote:
I started with Applesoft BASIC on our Apple //e. made simple games. seemed to always beat my brothers, until they typed my name when the game asked for our names, then I didn't win so much.
Reminds me of a poker game on the first digital computer I programmed -- a Royal McBee LGP-30 -- after a bit of experience with a couple of analog computers in the Computer Lab. It cheated. If you had a pair of face cards and it had an Ace, as I recall, it would search the deck looking for an other Ace. If it found one it pulled it from the middle of the deck and played it. Of course, the machine was so slow (the Accumulator was a circulating track on the drum memory), that you always knew when it was searching the deck.
 
Old 10-31-2020, 06:18 AM   #353
hazel
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So you actually used analog machines. How were they programmed?
 
Old 11-01-2020, 01:43 PM   #354
Rich Strebendt
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Quote:
So you actually used analog machines. How were they programmed?
Since the analog computers were used to solve integro-differential equations, the constant values were programmed by setting potentiometers ("pots" for short) to the required resistance settings to solve the equations using the voltages in the circuit as analogs to the variables in the equation. Each pot was associated with a voltage source which the cirtuitry then integrated over time to solve the equation. The output of the analog computer was a plot on a flat-bed plotter of the variable(s)/voltage(s) of interest. A DVM was hooked up so we could read the voltage directly on one or more outputs.
 
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Old 11-01-2020, 01:52 PM   #355
Rich Strebendt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Strebendt View Post
... The output of the analog computer was a plot on a flat-bed plotter of the variable(s)/voltage(s) of interest. A DVM was hooked up so we could read the voltage directly on one or more outputs.
As an example of what could be done very simply, for an Engineering Open House we set one of the analog computers with a simple simulation of the equations involved in landing a space capsule. Retrorockets and lateral thrusters were controlled from a joystick hooked up to the computer. The gravity of the "planit" on which you were landing was set by one pot, and the amount of fuel you had left was initialized on another pot. The plotter showed how you meandered back and forth trying to acquire control over the capsule, and the DVM showed the depth of the hole you made when you crashed. Everyone who tried to land safely came to appreciate the much more sophisticated flight simulators used by pilots and astronauts.
 
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Old 11-06-2020, 07:03 PM   #356
Voltage
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VB6

Well, unless you mean with the Commodore 64 then it was BASIC.
Volt
 
Old 11-06-2020, 09:00 PM   #357
jailbait
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I first learned FORTRAN on an IBM 7094. One quarter of FORTRAN was the only computer course of any kind that Virginia Tech taught in 1965.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RoverDog View Post
Anybody here remember DOS Edlin editor?
Yes, it was junk. I tried it once and went to a shareware editor instead. Shareware was a predecessor of Open Source that had enough legal problems that the Shareware concept failed.

-----------------------
Steve Stites
 
Old 11-09-2020, 10:46 PM   #358
piobair
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I replied "assembly language," but "machine language" is probably more accurate.
My first program was a single card bootstrap loader for an IBM 1620. The purpose of the program was to instruct the machine to read and execute the following deck of cards.
 
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Old 11-17-2020, 05:10 PM   #359
bitonw
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Applesoft on the Apple II
 
  


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