LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Latest LQ Deals
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > Programming
User Name
Password
Programming This forum is for all programming questions.
The question does not have to be directly related to Linux and any language is fair game.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 11-17-2004, 06:05 PM   #1
jstephens84
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Nashville
Distribution: Manjaro, RHEL, CentOS
Posts: 2,098

Rep: Reputation: 102Reputation: 102
Programming language.


I need help. I am frustrated in trying to learn a language. I have tried many books on java, visual basic, c, and c++. I could not understand any of them. could anyone recommend a book that is not too technical in starting but not dumbed down to where it is boring. I have found many programs that use the usuall hello world. I am trying to find a book that gives you real world example programs. Any help would be appreciated. I am really wanting to learn a new language.

thanks.
 
Old 11-17-2004, 06:15 PM   #2
perfect_circle
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Athens, Greece
Distribution: Slackware, arch
Posts: 1,783

Rep: Reputation: 53
that's a tough question.
See this thread
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...hreadid=253770
 
Old 11-17-2004, 06:19 PM   #3
secesh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Savannah, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mythbuntu, ClarkConnect
Posts: 1,154

Rep: Reputation: 47
languages are so similar... programming boils down to effective algorithms.

then there's learning the biggies, like how java/c handle variables differently -- pass by reference, and what-not. or compiled vs interperted...

when i learn a language, i like to try and find out what's 'wierd' about it, or why i should be interested in that language in the first place, then jump right in to syntax constraints. i find a dev guide book for a language to be an invaluable reference, while google can answer many specific questions...
 
Old 11-17-2004, 06:41 PM   #4
perfect_circle
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Athens, Greece
Distribution: Slackware, arch
Posts: 1,783

Rep: Reputation: 53
Quote:
when i learn a language, i like to try and find out what's 'wierd' about it, or why i should be interested in that language in the first place, then jump right in to syntax constraints. i find a dev guide book for a language to be an invaluable reference, while google can answer many specific questions...
That's true and very logical, but you have to have some programming experience first.
You must first learn at least a functional and an object oriented language, and then consider those things.
You can't learn what call by value and call by reference is, or what the benefits of automatically/manually freeing of dynamically allocated memory are when you don't know at least one language first.
That's why in the universities the start first by leaning C or Pascal and then move to general issues about programming languages.
 
Old 11-17-2004, 06:43 PM   #5
secesh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Savannah, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mythbuntu, ClarkConnect
Posts: 1,154

Rep: Reputation: 47
makes sense
 
Old 11-17-2004, 07:49 PM   #6
wapcaplet
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 2,018

Rep: Reputation: 48
To me, the best, and the only really good reason to learn a language is if you think it will help you write programs. If you're planning to arbitrarily pick one, without consideration for why it might be useful to you, you may find that it's harder to get going. It does help to have some experience under your belt to help you choose; if you already know some languages, ask yourself why you want to learn a new one, and what you hope to gain from the knowledge.

If you don't know any programming languages at all, though, then I think just about any language except Visual Basic would be a good starting point. Find any good introduction to a language and use that as a foundation to build your programming repertoire.
 
Old 11-17-2004, 08:52 PM   #7
Zuggy
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Pocatello, Idaho, USA
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 256

Rep: Reputation: 30
Try Python. I'm going to try it out. I hear that it's probaby the easiest starting language and it teaches you could programming habits.

Also Hello World is the standard first program for any language. Sure it doesn't look like much but even the (trumpets playing) Linus Torvalds started with Hello World and look where it got all of us. Also the best technical books are from O'Reilly Media. I haven't tried any of their programming books but I have used several of their other books (mostly Linux) and they're written easy enough to understand but advanced enough to be interesting. I rely on my O'Reilly Linux Pocket Reference for any commands I need.
 
Old 11-18-2004, 12:31 PM   #8
amos
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2002
Location: Bolton, UK
Distribution: Kubuntu
Posts: 224

Rep: Reputation: 30
Try "Problem Solving with C++: The Object Of Programming" by Walter Savitch

Cheers
Amos
 
Old 11-18-2004, 01:03 PM   #9
NNP
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Distribution: Debian/Ubuntu
Posts: 156

Rep: Reputation: 30
In college im using C++ programming: Program Design and data structures by D.S Malik. Its excellent and goes from very basic up to more advanced material.

Also i would recommend this http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial.html ..... its what got me started in c++.



NNP
 
Old 11-18-2004, 01:03 PM   #10
NNP
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Distribution: Debian/Ubuntu
Posts: 156

Rep: Reputation: 30
DOUBLE POST my bad

Last edited by NNP; 11-18-2004 at 01:04 PM.
 
Old 11-18-2004, 08:45 PM   #11
jstephens84
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Nashville
Distribution: Manjaro, RHEL, CentOS
Posts: 2,098

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 102Reputation: 102
Hey thank You guys so much for all your input. I have figured out that I am tyring to learn a language because I am trying to be a well rounded Systems analysts. I would like to create programs also to help me do day to day task. I Think I will try c again and will try O'reilly. Thanks Again.

All of your input is why I like this website so much.
 
Old 11-18-2004, 08:50 PM   #12
Chrax
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Distribution: Dapper
Posts: 167

Rep: Reputation: 31
C is kinda tough to start out on, but is very good once you get the hang of it. I started on very basic C++, and then just more or less worked on algorithms without ever actually coding them. Then I learned perl (which is very easy to pick up in a day if you've got the Camel book) and have moved up to C. That would be my suggestion, but to each his own.

Edit: by worked on algorithms, I'd think up ways to do things just in my spare time. Most of them were things I could do by hand, but just neat to think over.

Last edited by Chrax; 11-18-2004 at 08:58 PM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
which programming language is used to do tcp/ip programming?? gajaykrishnan Linux - Networking 9 12-21-2012 05:16 AM
Best programming language to use cudajaw Linux - Newbie 30 03-12-2005 04:09 AM
D Programming Language XsuX Programming 7 11-17-2004 08:55 PM
What programming language do you know? zikhermm Programming 11 09-15-2001 10:51 PM
Which programming language top111 Linux - Newbie 8 08-22-2001 07:21 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > Programming

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:52 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration