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Old 08-07-2017, 10:48 AM   #1
Fractal Cat
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Linux programmng books


Hi,

Can anyone suggest a good programming book for Linux? Do any exist?

Thanks

FC.
 
Old 08-07-2017, 11:53 AM   #2
pan64
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I'm afraid, there is no such thing (linux programming).
You might want to learn a programming language, or want to be familiar with a distro .... I have no idea.
Probably you can start here: www.tldp.org
 
Old 08-07-2017, 11:56 AM   #3
Jjanel
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lmgtfyNITpicker5K+posters: "Linux Programming" gets About 2,480,000 results.

So, I opine: Yes! What specific topic? Pick from here: (or from Amazon.com)
https://www.google.com/search?q=Linu...+books&spell=1

From your prior Thread: Assembly Language Step-by-Step: Programming with Linux (2009).

You can search for .pdf (filetype) specific titles / ISBN (OLD asm books)

Let us know! Enjoy your learning! Best wishes!

p.s. I get my books from the local public library. Do you have one? (URL?)

Last edited by Jjanel; 08-10-2017 at 07:41 AM.
 
Old 08-07-2017, 12:09 PM   #5
273
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A long time ago now I bought a book on "Linux Rapid Application Development" -- I'll admit it was relatively cheap but it was out of date and only a year old. I don't think Linux lends itself to books like that. however, I do miss my old C99 and C++ reference text as that would have been useful though I've not much need now.
 
Old 08-07-2017, 12:16 PM   #6
dugan
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I haven't read it, but I've heard good things about The Art of Unix Programming
 
Old 08-07-2017, 12:24 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
I haven't read it, but I've heard good things about The Art of Unix Programming
I may have to look for that but fear it may just end up helping prop up my router along with Knuth .
 
Old 08-07-2017, 12:25 PM   #8
astrogeek
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As pointed out by pan64, there is really no such thing as "Linux programming".

If you want to learn a programming language or a few, you should decide what languages or what type of applications you want to write, then locate resources for those specific languages.

If you want to learn the foundations of Unix, which are the foundations of GNU/Linux, then you can't beat Richard Stevens Advanced Programming In The Unix Environment (other free book links also in that page).

For learning your way around the system, there is Rute Users Tutorial and Exposition, and Bash for the shell!

To be any more specific you will need to provide a bit more information about what your goals are and your current level of experience.

Good luck!
 
Old 08-07-2017, 04:11 PM   #9
Michael Uplawski
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fractal Cat View Post
Can anyone suggest a good programming book for Linux? Do any exist?
Anything “Linux System Programming” or anything by Richard Stevens should fall into this category. In the German-speaking Usenet, calls for „der kleine Stevens” always made concurrence to shouts for RTF (with a few !).

But when I search for “Little Stevens” nowadays, I always get stuck in the Underground Garage and with Genya Ravan on Satellite Radio...

Pick your poison.
 
Old 08-08-2017, 12:21 AM   #10
NevemTeve
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Guessing from the Original Post, it should something like 'Shell scripting for beginners'. http://www.freeos.com/guides/lsst/
 
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Old 08-08-2017, 03:18 AM   #11
JJJCR
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This link may help: http://vic.gedris.org/Manual-ShellIn...ShellIntro.pdf
 
Old 08-08-2017, 01:10 PM   #12
fatmac
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Start with shell scripting/programming, also, on most if not all distros, you should find sed & awk, both good to learn without overpowering you. Once you have the basics of program structure, pick a programming language that you like.
 
Old 08-08-2017, 03:20 PM   #13
Habitual
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https://www.linuxquestions.org/quest...ks-4175433508/

Killing me, Smalls.
 
Old 08-09-2017, 10:04 AM   #14
Fat_Elvis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pan64 View Post
I'm afraid, there is no such thing (linux programming).
Quote:
Originally Posted by astrogeek View Post
As pointed out by pan64, there is really no such thing as "Linux programming".
Mightily disagree. Linux syscalls are hugely useful, and can be used in a variety of ways, high to low.

I'm sure many of these exist in other OSs, and some do not. Regardless, unless you insist on writing programs that compile and run on every "device" and gizmo out there - which is getting to be more trouble than it's worth for some types of programming, IMO, familiarity with a specific system will help a lot.

Last edited by Fat_Elvis; 08-09-2017 at 10:06 AM.
 
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Old 08-09-2017, 11:03 AM   #15
pan64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat_Elvis View Post
Linux syscalls
I don't think we are speaking about the same thing.
Linux itself cannot be programmed, this sentence does not make sense (for me).
But obviously there are syscalls - or system calls - which are part of the kernel, and obviously available (almost) everywhere. Sometimes we (may) say linux syscalls, which means kernel calls on a linux system.
But we still cannot have books on linux programming, but - probably - on kernel usage and/or kernel development.
From the other hand we can have some kind of linux installed on our computer and we may want to write some programs, which is again not programming linux, but programming on linux.
So actually it is confusing What is linux?.
 
  


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