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Old 01-16-2002, 07:47 PM   #1
vicente
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java


why can this give a for letter out put?

class Charte
{
public static void main(String args[])
{
char char1, char2, char3, char4;

char1 = 10;

char2 = 14;

char3 = 23;

char4 = 5;

System.out.print("my name: ");
System.out.println(char1 + char2 + " " + char3 + char4);
}
}
 
Old 01-17-2002, 01:46 PM   #2
Bert
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concatenation

Jose, I'm not sure what you're asking and what you're trying to do.

Looking at your code, java does strange things when you use the + sign with Strings and chars and ints.

What output did you want?

Bert
 
Old 01-18-2002, 04:30 AM   #3
glj
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To concatenate strings in Java should you not use the "."

i.e.
char1.char2." ".char3.char4

glj
 
Old 01-18-2002, 06:56 PM   #4
vicente
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the out put i wanted was :jose . I was trying to use the unicode , i dont know much about unicode so i thought that thoses numbers was the number for those 4 letters but it didnīt work out with ("char1+" "+char2") it works with 4 chars i dont know if the problem is the numbers or the use of 4 chars?
 
Old 01-19-2002, 09:53 AM   #5
Bert
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Unicode

Ah, ok.

From memory, what you are doing should work, but those numbers do not appear to be unicode values.
Have a look in the JDK1.3 directory and you'll find a demo applet which shows unicode values, select the appropriate ones from there and try again.
You would declare a type char like this

char char1 = 34c5; // 34c5 is not the real value - you need to check it yourself

type, name of type, assignment, then variable.

Concatenation is a fancy word for sticking two things together.
In java you use the + sign, although java does also use the dot notation to call a method,

like System.out.print calls the print method in the out class of the System superclass (I think).

Cymru am Byth // this is Welsh (I think).
 
Old 01-21-2002, 05:17 AM   #6
glj
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Quote:
Cymru am Byth // this is Welsh (I think).
It's Welsh for "Wales forever".
 
Old 01-21-2002, 03:22 PM   #7
Bert
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Actually I knew that one
 
Old 01-22-2002, 08:39 AM   #8
mtsinc
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Unicode in Java isn't as obvious as you might think. Sun has spent a lot of time making Java as locale-independent as possible. There's no such thing as:

char ch = char$(41)

in Java, because that assumes a particular encoding - not just ASCII or Unicode, where the number of bytes is different, but EBCDIC as well - EBCDIC is still very much alive and well, and IBM would just LOVE to sell you a mainframe where CICS runs with Java apps.

Try for something more like this:

public class Hi {
public static void main( String[] args ) {
byte[] hithere = new byte[2];
hithere[0] = 64 + 8;
hithere[1] = 64 + 9;
try {
String hiString = new String( hithere, "utf-8" );
System.out.println("I made a string: \"" + hiString + "\"");
} catch ( Exception ex ) {
System.out.println("Uh-oh! " + ex.getMessage() );
}
}
}

The arithmetic is because I was too lazy to count ASCII (UTF-8) on my fingers, so I let the compiler add it for me. If you want real Unicode, double the size of "hithere", set the even-numbered bytes to 0 (since Unicode is a 2-byte encoding extending ASCII) and use the encoding "UTF-16".

BTW, a good reasource for java questions is http://www.javaranch.com
 
  


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