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Old 10-10-2009, 07:15 AM   #31
choogendyk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prushik View Post
Umm.. WHAT THE HELL DID I JUST SAY?

http://www.google.com/products/catal...26&sa=button#p
Here's the link I found. You ignored it last time.
Just to set the record straight. I just looked back through all your posts on this thread. You did not post that link before. There was nothing to be ignored.
 
Old 10-11-2009, 02:19 PM   #32
smeezekitty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by choogendyk View Post
Just to set the record straight. I just looked back through all your posts on this thread. You did not post that link before. There was nothing to be ignored.
Cut It Out
 
Old 10-12-2009, 02:48 AM   #33
prushik
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It was in another thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smeezekitty View Post
Skyos operating system not maintained and i did not test it.
I looked at SkyOS. It isn't available for download currently. But it looks like its still being worked on. It looks like its planned to be a commercial OS, which doesn't make me feel good about it, but whatever, I'll keep an open mind. SkyOS seems to be focused on creating an OS that is really easy to use. Which is a good thing usually, but many OS that claim to be easy to use, are easy to use because they don't let you do very much. (disagree if you want). Sky OS is written completely from scratch, so I give the guy credit for that, however, it isn't finished yet. The screenshots look pretty good, the GUI looks nice, but its really hard to tell that from screenshots. The OS does not use any code from the gnu system, which makes it interesting. The GUI is completely written from scratch, and is called SkyGI. That looks like the most interesting thing about it right now. Apparently SkyOS development has hit some kind of blocking issue, something related to drivers (didn't read about it). So to get around the issue, they are porting essential parts of SkyOS to linux. Which sounds really cool because that includes the GUI. It would be nice if an alternative to X or the GNU userspace became available.
Overall, I'm not too impressed, I'm most excited about the work being done porting parts of it to linux. But I don't have much to base that on since I can't test it. So, we'll see (if it ever comes out).
 
Old 10-12-2009, 02:56 AM   #34
smeezekitty
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another one is visopsys again untested because i am short of time but looks promising
 
Old 10-12-2009, 03:32 AM   #35
jhwilliams
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All of that shit blows really bad. Linux just blows the least, which is why we use it.
 
Old 10-12-2009, 08:26 AM   #36
Mol_Bolom
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After first seeing this thread, I had a curious itch to look at some "obscure" OSes.

So far, not listed, I found AROS, and a light version called IcarosLive. And there is Bluebottle, also.

Unfortunately, I'm still too new to figure out how to get these to run, but eh, still interesting (if they work or not, ).
 
Old 10-12-2009, 11:54 AM   #37
smeezekitty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhwilliams View Post
All of that shit blows really bad. Linux just blows the least, which is why we use it.
and whats your problem?
 
Old 10-12-2009, 12:29 PM   #38
prushik
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I looked up visopsys, aros, bluebottle, and icaros.
Visopsys looks pretty good considering that it was written by one guy. Its pretty impressive that he got got so far. If he worked with a larger group of people on an OS, who knows what could have come out of it. But for not visopsys is pretty useless, it has no distinguishing features besides the fact that it was created by one person.
aros looks pretty cool, I will try it out.
Bluebottle also looks really nice, from the website I can't tell if it is available for the x86 or not though. If it is I will give it a try.
Icaros is just a aros distrobution. Its a live CD, so it can be tested easily.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhwilliams View Post
All of that sh*t blows really bad. Linux just blows the least, which is why we use it.
Seriously? Is that really necessary.
GNU/Linux is good, it does not blow, but like everything, it has its problems. Other OS's are good in other ways, and may have solutions for some of linux's problems, but fail in other categories. Many fail simply because people do not know about them and, therefore, nobody writes (or ports) programs for them. Getting the word out about operating obscure systems help them to grow, and if they grow enough, linux might not "blow the least" anymore. Or maybe linux users will see good concepts from other operating systems and do their part to help improve linux, helping linux grow.
If you don't care about this topic then don't read about it and don't post. I fail to see the point of your post.
 
Old 10-12-2009, 03:24 PM   #39
Mol_Bolom
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Unfortunately none of the computers I tested icaroslite on would work, as I read somewhere aros is not supported on much as of yet. However, I did get linux-i386-system to run using my linux system as a host, with no sound. It's not bad, and if an intel driver shows up for this machine it might even have a place in a small partition.
 
Old 10-12-2009, 04:08 PM   #40
prushik
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I'm about to try IcarosLive now. It's extracting from the archive (taking a long time, so there may be a problem...). I took a quick look at BlueBottle. It looked pretty good, the GUI showed up and everything worked as far as I could tell. It was hard to tell how fast it was, it seemed comparable to linux in speed. I didn't have a chance to do much with it, since I'm at work...
One thing I will say is that the GUI seemed hard to use, the layout wasn't like that of windows or linux, no "start-like" menu. But that just means that there is a learning curve, not necessarily a bad thing. It's my fault really for not knowing enough about the OS.
When I get home, I am going to start running some performance tests on these OS's to see how they compare to each other. I don't know what all I will test, give me some suggestions. I was thinking of recording boot times and writing a small c program that prints "hello world" 1000 times or something and timing its execution. I should run that test twice and the 2nd time not print to the screen, sometimes that makes a big difference. I think those will be good tests, unless the OS doesn't have a C compiler. I could use another language, but then it would be hard to compare it with the other OS's.

There is another OS that I found interesting. I think that it is long gone by now. It was written by Sun Microsystems, called JavaOS. The way I understand it, it is basically an operating system that could execute java programs natively, without the need for a java VM. Basically the idea is that if you could take the java VM and install it on your hard drive as a seperate OS, then that would be like JavaOS. I'm pretty sure the project has been scrapped now though. If you search hard enough you may be able to find a copy somewhere online.
 
Old 10-12-2009, 04:55 PM   #41
Mol_Bolom
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prushik View Post
I'm about to try IcarosLive now. It's extracting from the archive (taking a long time, so there may be a problem...).
Sounds like the same problems I ran into last night. I had installed p7zip, but it didn't work either. The only way I could even get into it was downloading the windows version then renaming the file from *.7z.exe to *.7z then extracting it. Then I tried to use the iso from that, which when grub started, something about "<" being a problem, or something like that (I didn't pay too much attention to it).

Then next I downloaded the pc-i386-boot.iso from http://aros.sourceforge.net/download.php, this one finally worked, but couldn't boot into the system. Two options in grub only showed an error being parsed over and over after pressing enter, and the others wouldn't load because the drivers weren't correct. Since it did have an option for loading nvidia, I tried that for a comp that has an 8600 on it, and when that didn't work I loaded the disk to see what display drivers it had and found only a GeForce 7800 driver.

<Update>Finally gave in and tried icaroslive on this computer (For some reason I have to lay the tower sideways in order to open the cd tray). It worked, far better than I had expected it to. However, it didn't run any faster than it did when setting it to 50mb while running it on Slackware.

Quote:
I took a quick look at BlueBottle. It looked pretty good, the GUI showed up and everything worked as far as I could tell. It was hard to tell how fast it was, it seemed comparable to linux in speed. I didn't have a chance to do much with it, since I'm at work...
One thing I will say is that the GUI seemed hard to use, the layout wasn't like that of windows or linux, no "start-like" menu. But that just means that there is a learning curve, not necessarily a bad thing.
The GUI on Aros is quite different, too. Instead of having menu items for any windows opened, there's buttons or a main menu which is only usable when the right mouse button is clicked (This menu is only shown on the GUI though, not in the windows).

I'll try to figure out a way to test bluebottle tonight. Used up the last of my CD's so will have to manipulate either a USB or a spare partition on my extra HD.


Quote:
When I get home, I am going to start running some performance tests on these OS's to see how they compare to each other. I don't know what all I will test, give me some suggestions. I was thinking of recording boot times and writing a small c program that prints "hello world" 1000 times or something and timing its execution. I should run that test twice and the 2nd time not print to the screen, sometimes that makes a big difference. I think those will be good tests, unless the OS doesn't have a C compiler. I could use another language, but then it would be hard to compare it with the other OS's.
I'm sure this doesn't count as a performance test, but when using my Slackware 12.2 box as a host system, I ran it with only 50mb of memory. When loading, it has an option for how much memory, and have been trying it with 200mb and 100mb, the only differences I've found were with graphics. Other than that no big differences at all.

Last edited by Mol_Bolom; 10-13-2009 at 12:49 AM.
 
Old 10-12-2009, 10:39 PM   #42
smeezekitty
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you havent updated your list latly
 
Old 10-13-2009, 07:24 AM   #43
synss
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mol_Bolom View Post
Unfortunately, I'm still too new to figure out how to get these to run, but eh, still interesting (if they work or not, ).
You may try in virtualbox or vmware if they are meant for the same architecture as your computer (most likely i386) or else, try Qemu. Although you should know that, if the penalty for running in virtualbox/vmware is negligible, the one for emulating another architecture in Qemu is not. Well, at least last time I checked.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prushik
When I get home, I am going to start running some performance tests on these OS's to see how they compare to each other. I don't know what all I will test, give me some suggestions. I was thinking of recording boot times and writing a small c program that prints "hello world" 1000 times or something and timing its execution. I should run that test twice and the 2nd time not print to the screen, sometimes that makes a big difference. I think those will be good tests, unless the OS doesn't have a C compiler. I could use another language, but then it would be hard to compare it with the other OS's.
The boot time may not be a bad idea, although it will tell you just that: the boot time and not much about the OS. Also note that the boot time in Linux already depends a lot on the distribution and the services that start. Compiling Hello World! in C will tell you a lot about the C compiler, nothing about the OS. I do not know how you can measure the "speed" of on OS (apart from throwing a CD in the air ). Just use it and report your feelings.
 
Old 10-15-2009, 10:57 AM   #44
Mol_Bolom
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Finally got BlueBottle to load onto this system.
2.0ghz : 512mb : Intel VGA 845G, Audio 801DB.

In order to edit the bootloader have to either press the Scroll Lock key, or press and hold down CTRL, Shift, or ALT before it loads. Then at the prompt had to add ATADetect=legacy.

After installing to a partition on a 3rd hard drive, the bootloader didn't install correctly so have to use the CD to boot into it, have to change BootVol1=(whatever) to BootVol1=AOS AosFS IDE2#1. Luckily the disk numbering scheme is fairly Grub like. IDEa#b = (hda,b).

As for speed, well on a 166mhz, clocked between 193mhz and 183mhz (different boot times) 192mb mem, AOS ran a little faster than Puppy Linux 4.1.1.

On this machine, however, it runs quite well, the video Flags in the demos was not choppy at all.

Either way only two problems to fix, the bootloader and sound.

Now to work on AROS, then after I get that installed (keeps crashing while trying to copy files to hd) I will read up and figure out how to get vsopsys up and running.

<Edit>
Aros installed, mostly, after re-editing the partitions and leaving an empty partition for it to use (Unfortunately it did create an extended partition, when it was unnecessary). It installed all the major files, except for the developement files, but it does load. So far no problems with that one either.
</edit>

Quote:
Originally Posted by synss View Post
You may try in virtualbox or vmware if they are meant for the same architecture as your computer (most likely i386) or else, try Qemu. Although you should know that, if the penalty for running in virtualbox/vmware is negligible, the one for emulating another architecture in Qemu is not. Well, at least last time I checked.
Yesterday I tried compiling qemu, twice it froze my system (killed X and many other things, luckily I could ssh in and shut it down), and another time, instead of using the SlackBuild script, I used src2pkg which it failed, as well, but didn't freeze the system. Either way, though, I'd prefer running natively anyway.

<edit> After looking over the thread with a poll about virtual machines, I think I understand what you were talking about. (Bloody internal CPU within my Skeletal SU didn't process the negative statements in that syntax)...

Last edited by Mol_Bolom; 10-15-2009 at 12:53 PM.
 
Old 10-16-2009, 12:29 PM   #45
prushik
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smeezekitty View Post
you havent updated your list latly
I'm sorry. Unfortuantely, I have the flu. I've been pretty miserable for the past few days, I should be getting better soon though.
 
  


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