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Old 10-15-2010, 01:32 AM   #1
katsuki
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su command pops out 100 of shell.


Hello,
I am new here.But please let me get to the point. I typed a command su -s /bin/ksh into Mandriva shell. Before I typed in that command I can use the shell as su, of course. But after that command, when I change to su, the shell pops out 100 of shell, literally. How can I repair it or undo that command. Please Help me out. Thank you.

Last edited by katsuki; 10-15-2010 at 01:34 AM.
 
Old 10-15-2010, 07:08 AM   #2
AlucardZero
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What?
 
Old 10-15-2010, 07:52 AM   #3
kc4mts
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I do not know if I can be of much help. It appears as though you may have changed the directory where su gets its password information from and changed it to /bin/ksh (I am making an uneducated guess at this statement).
If you start your terminal program and type in "man su" it should bring up the manual (man page) for su which gives you the information on using the su command.
I do not know how to undo the shell (-s) that you have made. I would wait for a user with more knowledge to reply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by katsuki View Post
Hello,
I am new here.But please let me get to the point. I typed a command su -s /bin/ksh into Mandriva shell. Before I typed in that command I can use the shell as su, of course. But after that command, when I change to su, the shell pops out 100 of shell, literally. How can I repair it or undo that command. Please Help me out. Thank you.
 
Old 10-15-2010, 12:43 PM   #4
unSpawn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlucardZero View Post
What?
One word replies make sense if there's a clear question like this or it may be ambiguous when it's not clear what part exactly you're replying to. I hope you, as a senior LQ member, are able to understand that a fellow LQ, who may not be not a fluent English speaker, on seeing his or her first question being replied to with a plain "what" may perceive LQ as less helpful as we would like to.

Please don't use one word replies in this type of case and please help him / her by asking questions.
If that's not your cup of $beverage then you can also choose to pass up on replying.
 
Old 10-15-2010, 01:03 PM   #5
AlucardZero
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I just can't make any sense of "the shell pops out 100 of shell, literally."

I was hoping he'd read the link in my sig, too.
 
Old 10-15-2010, 07:31 PM   #6
mecelec415
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what happens if you enter
su -
or su -l
into a new shell? they mean (-, -l, --login)

about what my system says about su -s I ve never used that 1 thou.
-s, --shell=SHELL run SHELL if /etc/shells allows it
 
Old 10-16-2010, 01:33 AM   #7
ernie
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Try entering the following command:
Code:
su -s /bin/bash
It should set bash as the command shell.

HTH,
 
Old 10-20-2010, 12:53 AM   #8
katsuki
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Hello,
First of all, thanks to all of you. I am sorry that if my question was so vague for you. Pls. let me mention a little further. I logged in as a normal user into shell and I typed that su -s /bin/ksh command. So the shell asked me the root passwd. I typed in the passwd. It was still fine. Nothing happened. But next time I changed to su, the shell asked me the passwd, so I typed in. And then 100 of shells appeared one after another on the screen. Looked like they were not going to stop. I even found hard time to close them all.
But later I found out with chsh -l command, I don't have ksh (korn shell?) in my system.(Mandriva). The command su -s /bin/bash didn't work out, sadly.
For now, I hope you all will understand my question a little more. Anyway, thanks for your time.

Last edited by katsuki; 10-20-2010 at 01:00 AM.
 
Old 11-04-2010, 06:15 AM   #9
GlennsPref
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Is it necessary to use the korn-shell?

Forgive my inquisitiveness.

I use zsh.

And have set up the system to use it whenever the system is running.

I make the setting for myself and root in the "user" settings, setting zsh as the default shell.

Then I also set konsole (kde terminal app) to reflect the same.

The package may require installation before it works.

If the shell is bash, (after boot,) after using ksh, type exit to get back to bash from ksh.

The file /etc/shells lists the order of shell to use.

Code:
/bin/bash
/bin/csh
/bin/dash
/bin/sh
/bin/tcsh
/bin/zsh
any "new users" will use bash by default, not zsh.



Regards Glenn

Last edited by GlennsPref; 11-04-2010 at 06:18 AM. Reason: gramma
 
Old 11-04-2010, 10:01 AM   #10
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katsuki View Post
Hello,
First of all, thanks to all of you. I am sorry that if my question was so vague for you. Pls. let me mention a little further. I logged in as a normal user into shell and I typed that su -s /bin/ksh command. So the shell asked me the root passwd. I typed in the passwd. It was still fine. Nothing happened. But next time I changed to su, the shell asked me the passwd, so I typed in. And then 100 of shells appeared one after another on the screen. Looked like they were not going to stop. I even found hard time to close them all.
But later I found out with chsh -l command, I don't have ksh (korn shell?) in my system.(Mandriva). The command su -s /bin/bash didn't work out, sadly.
For now, I hope you all will understand my question a little more. Anyway, thanks for your time.
Thanks for the full explanation of what happened. Unfortunately I have no idea what might have caused the symptoms you describe. Let's hope someone can explain it.
 
  


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