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Old 09-13-2004, 08:59 PM   #16
cyclocommuter
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Quote:
Originally posted by Linux24
Your are correct, sir! The Pentium 1 166mhz is below the minimum requirements for Windows XP and Windows 2000. 64 MB is below the minimum requirements for both as well.

I don't think our intrepid friend can compare the performance of something as small and un-powerful as Windows 95 (which *would* run on his equipment pretty quickly) and the big, fat, heavy installs of Linux circulating today - such as Mandrake 10.0.
Haha... I suspect these GUI manufacturers (XP / KDE) are conspiring with the hardware folks so we need to upgrade every 1 to 2 years :-)

I remember reading somewhere a few months back that you need a 4 Ghz class CPU to run Longhorn... but that was before the new filesystem was truncated to meet release dates. I won't be surprised if you needed the same 4 Ghz class CPU to run KDE 3.6 / GNOME 3.0 :-)
 
Old 09-14-2004, 10:36 AM   #17
jterr02
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HJ,
You are bogging down the processor. Run your apps in a window from command line where possible, generally typing int he app name or initials will get it going. i.e. superkaramba. Doing so will allow for detailed error messages. Those error messages and a google search will get you fixed in no time.

Win XP home is fine as long as you dont mind allowing every process run as root, even the spyware and trojans you are bound to get as soon as you connect to the internet.
 
Old 09-14-2004, 10:39 AM   #18
jterr02
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Quote:
Originally posted by cyclocommuter
Haha... I suspect these GUI manufacturers (XP / KDE) are conspiring with the hardware folks so we need to upgrade every 1 to 2 years :-)

I remember reading somewhere a few months back that you need a 4 Ghz class CPU to run Longhorn... but that was before the new filesystem was truncated to meet release dates. I won't be surprised if you needed the same 4 Ghz class CPU to run KDE 3.6 / GNOME 3.0 :-)
Easier answer is that with more powerful pcs come more powerful enviroments and options. I doubt anyone working on KDE or Gnome is getting kickbacks from Intel or AMD tho I am sure Microshaft is in bed with them.

Graphical capability has improved a million fold obviously since the old green and orange monochrome stuff.
 
Old 09-14-2004, 12:16 PM   #19
greenmeanie
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mandrake 10

i have found mandrake 10 to be the easiest DISTRO to install and run. and i have tried them all
 
Old 09-28-2004, 02:24 AM   #20
Kahless
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I actually ran mandrake 8 on a p166 with 48 megs of ram. The only reasons I hated it were its crappy fonts and miserable crashing installer (possibly due to the crappy hardware) Most of teh stuff worked ok thou, IF i coudl get it installed. Had i known how to install rmp from CLI at the time, I might have actually enjoyed it.


The main thing you are going to need is more ram.

Also, always install all of the Development options. If you can compile software from source, which is really easy, you can install just about anything. Most likley, any software you follow the instructions on and cant get to install that is failing, is failing because you didnt install the development stuff.


Be paitent with yourself. it takes awhile to learn linux, but once you learn and get used to it, you will love it. the thing I loved about that shitty mandrake box was, the main OS never crashed, not once. The installer would crash, but the rest of the os would run. I had 48 days of uptime when I shut it down to add another 16 megs of ram, and this machien was a dumpster-pull.


Have fun, and try slackware some day
 
Old 09-28-2004, 07:19 PM   #21
Linux24
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Quote:
The thing I loved about that shitty mandrake box was, the main OS never crashed, not once. The installer would crash, but the rest of the os would run. I had 48 days of uptime when I shut it down to add another 16 megs of ram, and this machien was a dumpster-pull.
This is not directed at you in particular - you were simply recounting your experience. But it causes me to think about the fact that a lot of Linux devotees are very quick to point out the stability of Linux.

People really shouldn't spread the myth about Linux being crash-proof. It's not. Mandrake 10 in particular *will* crash. I can make it crash just by trying to install it. The machine will hard-lock unless you edit lilo.conf to turn off power management functions that Mandrake doesn't support, doesn't detect for, and does not ignore. If it doesn't crash during install, it will hard lock during regular usage until these edits are made. This happens quite a bit.

I can also make mandrake crash by running XMMS on it and repeatedly double clicking icons for MP3 files in KDE. It will reload, reload, reload, and finally it will hard lock.

But OS level crashes are not the users only concern. Does the user care whether it is the office software or the OS that crashes? Either way, he's screwed. Linux software crash, crash, crashes. KDE is not as stable as the GUI shell in Windows XP by a longshot. You can configure a program to be the primary program for a file type, and then sometimes KDE just "forgets." I've never seen any version of Windows do that.

Linux is cool, linux has come a long way, I run Linux because I am sick of spyware, viruses, and I prefer driving a stick over an automatic where my PC is concerned. But crashes happen in Linux. A lot of the software is written in an amateurish fashion, and some of it is experimental. Some of it seems pretty stable, but with heavy use, you might find out otherwise for many programs.

Heck, I can't even make Konqueror's window stick to the spot where I left it in KDE. It just goes to a free corner whereever it pleases - seemingly randomly.
 
Old 09-28-2004, 07:51 PM   #22
amosf
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At the same time, linux24, you can't call 'linux' unstable in general just because mandrake tends to be cutting edge and uses patches that are not stable with all hardware. You can easily turn an unstable mdk10 box into a very spable one by changing to a generic kernel and removing automount - and put mounting back into user space where I find KDE does a good job with CD's already.
 
Old 09-28-2004, 07:56 PM   #23
cyclocommuter
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Quote:
Originally posted by Linux24

Heck, I can't even make Konqueror's window stick to the spot where I left it in KDE. It just goes to a free corner whereever it pleases - seemingly randomly.
Right click on Konqueror title bar, Select Advanced, then toggle "Store Windows Settings" to on. Works for me.
 
Old 09-28-2004, 11:55 PM   #24
Linux24
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Quote:
Originally posted by cyclocommuter
Right click on Konqueror title bar, Select Advanced, then toggle "Store Windows Settings" to on. Works for me.
It works for me only when I open the application initially. Spawned children appear in random location despite this setting.
 
Old 09-29-2004, 12:00 AM   #25
Linux24
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Quote:
Originally posted by amosf
At the same time, linux24, you can't call 'linux' unstable in general
I did not call Linux unstable in general. I said that it is not crash proof. In general, the operating system hard locks on me less often than Windows, but the applications themselves tend to crash or be more unstable than their mainstream Windows counterparts. But that's my experience, perhaps not others. Any power user in any OS can make things work better for him, but my argument is that out of the box everything should work maximally without any user intervention or manual configuration.

Quote:
just because mandrake tends to be cutting edge and uses patches that are not stable with all hardware. You can easily turn an unstable mdk10 box into a very spable one by changing to a generic kernel and removing automount
No desktop OS can succeed the current incumbents with this as a requirement. The average desktop OS user doesn't even want to know what OS he is running, much less what a kernel is, what a compiler is, etc. It has to work out of the box.

Quote:
- and put mounting back into user space where I find KDE does a good job with CD's already.
Irrelevant to all but computer scientists and tinkering power users - which I am and you are, but most are not.
 
Old 09-29-2004, 12:35 AM   #26
Neutron1998
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I don't know how yall are having problems with Mandrake 10.x installing. Mine was very painless and quite easy. I have a Dell (soon to be replaced) 1.7GHz P4.
 
Old 09-29-2004, 08:41 AM   #27
doublejoon
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Just install Mandrake 10 then recompile the kernel (optimize for your hardware) , and turn off unecessary servers....It should run better
 
Old 10-06-2004, 11:00 AM   #28
frizzo3
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Information Only

Just for Sh!ts and Giggles.

Installed Windows XP with SP2
on a Pentium 166mmx
with 64mb RAM
2.6gig Harddrive

Installed IIS5.1
mySQL (can't remember the version#, but the current one for sept2004)
ActivePerl 5.6

It worked, and was stable, AND SLOW.

At one point it was using 75% of it's 256mb swap file.
The lack of RAM on this system was the BIGGEST issue.


I have tried a Pentium 200mmx with 256mb of ram, and Windows 2003 server, and it is quite smooth and responsive.


Therefore, RAM IS THE KEY... I imagine that this would hold true for the lastest Mandy (10.1).


Has anyone actually tried Mandy 10 on a ~Pentium 166 with ~64mb of ram? What is it like / How did it run?
 
Old 10-06-2004, 12:09 PM   #29
leadsling
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Lightbulb try vector linux

I've inherited a bunch of old Pentium II 233/266 mhz desktops recently and have been experimenting with different distros to see if I could get a usable system going. The distros include Mandrake(which I love and have on my main home computer), Gentoo, Slackware, Knoppix, and Suse. Mandrake does good if the system has 128 mb ram. A couple of these units use EDO and I only had enough EDO sticks to get them to 58MB. Mandrake would run but real slow. I read about a new release yesterday for Vector Linux. It is supposed to breathe new life into old systems. I dowloaded the iso (about 365MB) yesterday, burned the disk, and installed it today. It works GREAT! It is based on slackware but has some system tools that ease the hardware setup. It uses some of the lighter programs (such as ICEWM, dillo web browser, sylpheed mail, abiword, etc) but it is quick and snappy for such a low powered system. Give it a try. http://www.vectorlinux.com
 
Old 10-07-2004, 02:03 PM   #30
amosf
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"Has anyone actually tried Mandy 10 on a ~Pentium 166 with ~64mb of ram? What is it like / How did it run?"

I haven't, no. I put mandrake 9.2 on a P150 64 meg ram recently with KDE and it runs okay. Runs mostly in ram. I have a feeling MDK would not be greatly different, but you need more PC to use all the features of any modern OS obviously.
 
  


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