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Warmaster 05-20-2004 11:53 PM

Geforce 4 and MDK10 official
 
I'm trying to get the nvidia drivers installed, but it says it can't find the correct kernel for my installation, and then that it can't find it on my HD.

I just want to install my GF4 to play ET, help me out please.
(caution: I'm a linux noob)

Andrew Benton 05-21-2004 01:44 AM

The kernel-source is on the Mandrake CD's. There's a software installing tool in the Mandrake Control Centre.

elluva 05-21-2004 04:52 AM

indeed, you can just install it with the urpmi tool (urpmi kernel-source), just make sure it installs the correct kernel source, I had that problem with Mdk 9.2...

Warmaster 05-21-2004 02:12 PM

...
 
2.6.3-7
that's my kernel, the one that comes with 10 official.

now I try to boot to failsafe and log in as root, but it says my password is wrong.
I don't know what I'm doing wrong...

help please...

edit:

I pressed alt+ctrl+F1 and managed to log in as root, exit x server, install the drivers, edit XF86Config-4, and when I boot It says it can't load x server because the kernel is different or some other bs.

I did this with a fresh 10 official install, and the kernel provided in the cd's...

I'm starting to lose faith in this, it's a pain in the ass...

Warmaster 05-21-2004 05:45 PM

bump.


can anyone please make a how-to guide stating all the steps necessary to install an nvidia graphics card in mandrake 10 official ?

please help, this topic is endless...

trackrat 05-21-2004 06:59 PM

I also have problems with a GF5700 card as far as the drivers are concerned.
Take a look at this link it may help.
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...989#post943989

elluva 05-22-2004 01:40 AM

ok, here comes the wanted guide:

First install your kernel-source, you can do this by using urpmi. First find out your kernel version (e.g 'kernelversion' as root). Then

$> su
#> urpmi -y kernel-source

You'll get a list with the available kernel sources. Make sure you select the right one, cause if the nvidia installer doesn't find the driver for your exact kernel it will attempt it itself.

#> urpmi 'the_right_item_from_the_list_above'
#> wget http://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/L...-5336-pkg1.run
#> chmod u+x NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-5336-pkg1.run
#> ./NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-5336-pkg1.run

Now just follow the guidelines on the screen, the install should go well from now on. If there are any problems, post here...

Warmaster 05-22-2004 11:59 AM

Warmaster
 
elluva, I love you.

ps: how do I edit text files in the console ? (e.g. XF86Config-4)

elluva 05-22-2004 01:42 PM

Last post I forgot to mention that before you install the drivers you have to quit X. You should read the readme that comes with the drivers as well how to get X using the drivers (that isn't hard if you do what the readme says).

in mandy right... vi should work, but with some luck you have pico or nano. The latter are way more userfriendly. Pico should be included in the pine package. I don't use pine, but pico is such a damned easy to use editor that I install it anyway (urpmi pine). Vi is not very straightforward, this is what you should know:

$> vi filename

to edit type 'i'
to save type ':x (enter)'
to quit without saving ':q! (enter)'

To explain these bizarre things quickly, when you start up vi you aren't in 'edit mode'. Every button you type is a command, i stands for insert, a for append,... Press esc to go out of edit mode. Vi is a quite advanced text editor, you can do a lot of complicated things with short commands (see manpage). These commands are issued by pressing : first, then you can see at the bottom of your screen were you can type them. Of course x isn't complicated, it just means save and exit. q means quit, but won't work if you edited the file, so you have to overide this protection with ! (this is why you type :q!).

Hope this will help you. Oh and I am already very happy if you just help people here on LQ, you don't have to love me :p .

Greetingz,
Elluva

Warmaster 05-22-2004 01:54 PM

...
 
lol right now, I can't help anybody...

because I don't know ANYTHING about linux...

MDK is my first try...

elluva 05-23-2004 05:37 AM

Well, in that case you chose the right distro to start from. By trying to help others and reading here on LQ, you should learn quite fast.
Learning how to use Linux isn't hard, it is setting it up that's hard and that's just what mandrake does for you. I recommend that once you're at ease with mdk, you try something harder like slackware. It suprised me how much I didn't know and how fast I learn't.

utanja 05-23-2004 08:15 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by elluva
Well, in that case you chose the right distro to start from. By trying to help others and reading here on LQ, you should learn quite fast.
Learning how to use Linux isn't hard, it is setting it up that's hard and that's just what mandrake does for you. I recommend that once you're at ease with mdk, you try something harder like slackware. It suprised me how much I didn't know and how fast I learn't.

quite true....i use RED HAT for years and only recently switch to debian and in 3 months learn more about Linux than the last 10 years...

Warmaster 05-23-2004 09:26 PM

...
 
After doing everything except editing XFConfig-4, going into KDE and using Krite should get it done, right ?

I'm not used to no-gui interfaces...


ps: why should I check my kernel version?, it's the one that comes with mandrake 10 OFFICIAL...

Quote:

Originally posted by elluva
Last post I forgot to mention that before you install the drivers you have to quit X. You should read the readme that comes with the drivers as well how to get X using the drivers (that isn't hard if you do what the readme says).

in mandy right... vi should work, but with some luck you have pico or nano. The latter are way more userfriendly. Pico should be included in the pine package. I don't use pine, but pico is such a damned easy to use editor that I install it anyway (urpmi pine). Vi is not very straightforward, this is what you should know:

$> vi filename

to edit type 'i'
to save type ':x (enter)'
to quit without saving ':q! (enter)'

To explain these bizarre things quickly, when you start up vi you aren't in 'edit mode'. Every button you type is a command, i stands for insert, a for append,... Press esc to go out of edit mode. Vi is a quite advanced text editor, you can do a lot of complicated things with short commands (see manpage). These commands are issued by pressing : first, then you can see at the bottom of your screen were you can type them. Of course x isn't complicated, it just means save and exit. q means quit, but won't work if you edited the file, so you have to overide this protection with ! (this is why you type :q!).

Hope this will help you. Oh and I am already very happy if you just help people here on LQ, you don't have to love me :p .

Greetingz,
Elluva


estatik 05-23-2004 11:17 PM

Re: ...
 
Quote:

Originally poster by elluva
to save type ':x (enter)'
to quit without saving ':q! (enter)'

elluva, correct me if I'm wrong but for the sake of the newbies, but didn't you forget to instruct Warmaster to hit the [ESC] key before typing ":" ? And shouldn't save be ":wq" instead of ":x" ? I dunno, but that's how I've always saved when editing with vi.

EDIT: Opps, didn't see the "esc" in your post:o

Quote:

Originally posted by Warmaster
After doing everything except editing XFConfig-4, going into KDE and using Krite should get it done, right ?

I'm not used to no-gui interfaces...


ps: why should I check my kernel version?, it's the one that comes with mandrake 10 OFFICIAL...

Warmaster, I'm not sure if you'll be able to get into GUI with the nvidia driver if you don't check/edit your /etc/X11/XF86Config-4 file. You might be able to get into GUI if the "nv" module is still being loaded, but that defeats your purpose of installing the driver.

If you still need step-by-step instructions on getting the driver installed, look at this past post I made.

I too, like my GUI interfaces, and I'm not about to get into a cli vs. gui war here, but getting comfortable with cli will benefit your experience greatly. What will you do if your GUI suddenly goes bezerk and commits suicide? The only way you can try to bring it back from the dead is by the all-powerful potion called CLI.

I think the reason why you were asked to check your kernel version is that: a) sometimes different kernels will get installed as default, and, b) so that you will know which kernel-source-version to install;).

Good luck and have fun!

Warmaster 05-23-2004 11:44 PM

...
 
god, I don't know what I am doing wrong... but it's still not working...

My kernel is 2.6.3-7
I installed that same kernel-source and the nvidia installer accepted it, compiled whatever it compiles, and if I use 'nvidia' drivers, kde does not load...

right now, I'm using 'nv' drivers. (thanks elluva for the 'vi' thing... I was thinking of a 3rd reinstall)

what could be wrong ?


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