LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General > LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro
User Name
Password
LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro New to LinuxQuestions.org? Been a long time member but never made a post? Introduce yourself here.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 11-13-2012, 05:17 AM   #1
hannan00
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2012
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Hello Everyone!


Hannan here from sydney, australia. I am new to this forum and also to unix/linux world. i am tired of windows and i really hate apple technology, so i found myself interested to linux. I want to start from the beginning and dreaming to become a linux/unix system admin in future. Can anyone please come forward to me as a mentor? I would appriciate anyone's suggestions toward my destination.
Thanks
Cheers!
 
Old 11-13-2012, 09:23 PM   #2
frankbell
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mageia, Mint
Posts: 7,331

Rep: Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381
You might want to take a look at the Going Linux podcast. In addition to the podcast, they have a number of useful articles oriented to new Linux users.

Here are some other useful leads:

http://linux.about.com/. It's oriented to Ubuntu, but it's full of good info.

http://tille.garrels.be/training/tldp/. Machtelt Garrels's Intro to Linux.

http://www.slackbook.org/. Slackware oriented, but excellent on the basics, such as file structure, permissions, and the like.

Welcome to LQ.
 
Old 11-14-2012, 09:26 AM   #3
hannan00
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2012
Posts: 7

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Hi frankbell
thanks for the information you have posted for me. could you please tell me the differences between different versions of linux suce as Linux Fedora and Linux Ubuntu? Which one is much easier to start with for a new user? what is Red hat linux? Thanks again for your response.
Cheers!
 
Old 11-14-2012, 07:37 PM   #4
frankbell
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Virginia, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian, Mageia, Mint
Posts: 7,331

Rep: Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381Reputation: 1381
That's a really big question. Here's my short version:

The three oldest distributions are Slackware, Debian, and Red Hat/Fedora. Almost all the others are based on one of these and will be described as Debian-based, Slackware-based, or Red Hat-based. There are also some that are things unto themselves, such as Arch and Gentoo.

The primary differences involve how the system boots and what kind of package management is used. Red Hat-based distros use *.rpm (Red hat Package Manager) formats; Debian-based distros use *.deb (Debian) formats; Slackware uses *.tgz and *.txz formats.

Package formats are not compatible across package types. That is, you cannot install a *.deb package with the RPM package manager. However, in any type of Linux, you can compile and install software from sources, which is nowhere as complicated as the term sounds.

RPM and *.deb package managers will resolve dependencies. That is, if you want to install program A and it needs to have program B or library C installed, the package manager will install them automatically. Slackware does not resolve dependencies; it is not the Slackware Way, though some distros based on Slackware, such as SalixOS, do resolve dependencies.

The other primary difference is how the configuration files, normally located in the /etc directory, are organized and how programs are started up on boot. This difference is usually not an issue for the user unless he likes to tinker with that sort of stuff.

Many persons get hung up with the desktop environment or window manager that a distro comes with, but that is a superficial difference. Generally, any desktop environment (KDE, Gnome, XFCE) can be installed to and will run on any distro. If you decide you don't like Gnome and want to try KDE, you don't have to search for a distro that comes with KDE, you just install and use KDE on your existing system.

Slackware comes with six GUI interfaces out of the box, though most distros come with only one. On this here Debian box, I have KDE, Gnome 2.x (the default), FVWM, and Fluxbox installed, though Fluxbox is always my first choice.

That should be enough to get to you started. Here is a link to an article from the Arch wiki (always an excellent resource); it's written from an Arch perspective, but will tell you much more: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php...ions#Slackware

Last edited by frankbell; 11-14-2012 at 07:41 PM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:38 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration