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Old 02-17-2004, 10:10 PM   #1
linux-fan64
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Distribution: Mandrake 10 Official
Posts: 17

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Talking Hello Everyone! :)


Hello everyone. Name is Tony. A 40 year old computer nut living in Wisconsin, USA. This looked like a great place to get some ideas/answers, etc. Just wanted to say hi and will be checking in here alot. Actually, looking for a couple people to help out when I need a question or 2 answered (Lord knows I'll need it). Anyways, A little about me. I have been in computers for many years, 17+ to be close, started way back on Commodore 64's if any of you youngsters even know what one of those were. I am a network admin, very good with DOS (Or used to be) and Windows...yeesh, that name. I have been VERY interested in getting Linux running and switching away from Windows FOR GOOD. Which is why i'm here. Loaded Redhat 6 years ago, and loaded RH8 last year, but never got to stick with it. Loaded Redhat 9 now, but before I commit to that flavor of Linux, is there a better one to use than another and if so why? I DO NOT want to go back to Windows, want to stick with Linux and learn it. Plain talk and short answers are fine I found that Redhat stripped a bit out of packages, like MP3 support, etc. Can mp3 support be added back to Redhat? Anyway, I like the KDE environment pretty much, but use things from Gnome as well. Any answers would be MUCH appreciated.

Hope I'm not sounding too much like a leech or anything, just want to be started in the right direction

Thanks all!
 
Old 02-17-2004, 10:26 PM   #2
neo77777
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Registered: Dec 2001
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Distribution: *NIX
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Hi Tony, I am Boris I am a member here since December 2001, as for distributions differences and preferences among the members of LQ we have a large section dedicated just to that - Linux Distributions located under http://linuxquestions.org/questions/...p?s=&forumid=5
feel free to browse more than 3 year archive of threads, and make your choice.
 
Old 02-17-2004, 10:40 PM   #3
linux-fan64
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Distribution: Mandrake 10 Official
Posts: 17

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks Boris! I was looking around the forums a bit whilke waiting a reply. I notice in the forum you gave me the link to that Slackware seems to have the most posts, followed by Mandrake, and then Redhat. Just curious if those numbers reflect the amount of problems with each one or just the interest and use of each one..LOL. Guess I'll do some reading. Unless anyone else has a suggestion as to why they like Mandrake or Slackware or Redhat I'm in the process of downloading Mandrake Iso's now too. I may just try them out one by one. (I am the KING of system reloads ) hehe..course THATS because of the swine Microsoft systems
 
Old 02-17-2004, 11:15 PM   #4
SiriusAB
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: S_AB
Distribution: FC4; FC3; RH 9.0; XP
Posts: 86

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Quote:
Originally posted by linux-fan64
I found that Redhat stripped a bit out of packages, like MP3 support, etc. Can mp3 support be added back to Redhat?
Yes, with ease.

Quote:
Unless anyone else has a suggestion as to why they like Mandrake or Slackware or Redhat
OK. Linux software installation methods can be considered an "alien" concept for M$ refugees. As a quick and dirty rule of thumb, Mandy and RH are "easier" to modify--someone more automated, perhaps more GUI-centered. At first, it's easier to install an RPM than compile from source.

When you get more experience, you can (but don't have to) move to a more "specialized" distro like Slack or Debian. Gentoo and Knoppix are hot too these days, for other reasons.

I used a lot of quotes, because my comments are totally subjective, subject to disagreement (sometimes vehement).

Rather than worry so much about the distro you begin with, give a thought to your hardware and make an effort to see whether it's compatible with a certain *Nix distro. Certain equipment is central to your initial config (such as your network card, your AGP card). While you can fix problems on the fly, initial compatibility will move you along more quickly.
 
Old 02-17-2004, 11:29 PM   #5
SciYro
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: hopefully not here
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 2,038

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Quote:
started way back on Commodore 64's if any of you youngsters even know what one of those were
well i should say hi, im 16 and i used to sue a commodore 64 (it was my dad's then my mom tru it out!, and it was still perfectly good to use), so does that mean im old?, if you used those old commodore 64's then you defidently must be used to non GUI interfases, so as far as the simple "wich distro is best?!!" y not just get a small distro with like only the needed packages to startup and install programs, then you can get the source and recompile everything to update and customize the base system, then just get the source and compile everything else you want, that way you get the distro you want that suits you needs, pluss youll get to learn a lot about what programs do what, as well as how some things work, core linux is a good distro for this task its has all teh basic programs (pluss a few non essentials onesthat run on most system like perl), with a lnx-bbc live distro(this has suport for almost every popualr linux FS so its good yo boot with this then chroot over and compile),

as far as the biger "easy" to install distros id say just pick the few you like and flip a coin, after all, if it dont have somthing you want theres plently of open source programs out there to suit most of your needs
 
Old 02-18-2004, 12:22 PM   #6
linux-fan64
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Registered: Feb 2004
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Distribution: Mandrake 10 Official
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Ok, Thanks for the info Sirius! My hardware is pretty standard, nothing to out of ordinary. (Abit-AMD System) With Nvidia, SBLive, Intel NIC, etc. Redhat didn't seem to have a problem finding and using the hardware. Guess I'll try Redhat and Mandrake that I was downloading to get started. I know what you mean about the install issues. I have tried the RPM method, and although it seems easier, I'm trying to do it the normal way by compiling from source. At least thats my objective. I'd really like to get back to that style. I am a M$ DOS user from way back, so command lines are not that unfamiliar. And thanks also SciYro, you also gave me a couple things to think about. (Gads, the little snot knows QUITE abit more than me, but i'll catch up)..AND I mean little snot in the NICEST of terms hehe. (Dam kids these days..LOL) Anyways, either of you 2 have a suggestion for me on one of my biggest points? My question being, is there a decent place/site/book I can get to explain to me somewhat better how the Linux/UNIX file structure is created, and what the various common directories are used for? I know I have to throw out everything I learned of DOS, but if I can understand at least the directory structure and usage, that would be a HUGE thing for me as most of the install, etc items will make sense to me then. THANKS!
 
Old 02-18-2004, 12:28 PM   #7
Seventh
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Registered: Dec 2003
Location: Boston, MA
Distribution: Redhat / Debian
Posts: 269

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I use xmms for mp3's on Redhat 9, with no problems at all. It has a bunch of great skins for it too.

And I owned a C64 and Trash 80, my friend. I'm 27.
 
Old 02-18-2004, 12:59 PM   #8
aaa
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: VA
Distribution: Slack 10.1
Posts: 2,194

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Quote:
My question being, is there a decent place/site/book I can get to explain to me somewhat better how the Linux/UNIX file structure is created, and what the various common directories are used for? I know I have to throw out everything I learned of DOS, but if I can understand at least the directory structure and usage, that would be a HUGE thing for me as most of the install, etc items will make sense to me then.
Look at www.tldp.org under 'Guides' -> 'Linux Filesystem Hierarchy'.

Last edited by aaa; 02-20-2004 at 12:56 PM.
 
Old 02-18-2004, 01:54 PM   #9
MasterC
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Registered: Mar 2002
Location: Salt Lake City, UT - USA
Distribution: Gentoo ; LFS ; Kubuntu
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Moving to Member Intros

Cool
 
Old 03-15-2004, 02:57 AM   #10
Lavento
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Finland
Distribution: Redhat 7.3, Fedora Core 1, Debian 3.0, Slackware 9.1
Posts: 9

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Re: Hello Everyone! :)

Quote:
Originally posted by linux-fan64
Loaded Redhat 9 now, but before I commit to that flavor of Linux, is there a better one to use than another and if so why?
Try Fedora Core (http://fedora.redhat.com), because Redhat is stopping/has stopped support for Redhat 7.x, 8.x and 9.x
It's the same OS, but with different coulours =)

Redhat (and Fedora series) are considered as easiest way into Linux as someone already replied to you.
 
  


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