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Old 05-04-2011, 05:39 PM   #1
Weapon S
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Talking Ahoy there Linux lubbers!


Avast ye!
A thousand questions me stows. But I realized it's better not to ask them in one post, and that I could search the forum for each single one: so I decided to make a corny introduction instead, because I'm too tired to concentrate now. aarrrr...
Haven't used Linux for years. Haven't ever maintained a Linux system. (Unless you count storing those Live CD's in my drawer.)
So yeah, installing Debian will be an adventure (A nautical adventure AARRR!!!). I also never understood the user management and filesystems. Like: what problems are they trying to solve/what paradigm do they use? (Holds for Windows too :-X )So I'm hoping somebody here will give me some pointers on that too.
Tomorrow I will hopefully be booting up me installarrr and heading onto the vast blue.
Wish me luck.
(and help. I need help. seriously. professional help. give it to me)
 
Old 05-04-2011, 09:03 PM   #2
Larry Webb
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Hi and welcome to LQ
 
Old 05-05-2011, 08:37 AM   #3
MTK358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weapon S View Post
I also never understood the user management and filesystems. Like: what problems are they trying to solve/what paradigm do they use?
What do you mean exactly?
 
Old 05-07-2011, 08:49 AM   #4
Weapon S
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I'm not sure exactly... (Otherwise I would understand it ) The user part, is a little clear to me now. There are users, with different read/write/access permissions; and different "run privileges", or something. As far as the file system goes, I know Linux has a very abstract definition of 'file'. The meaning of the directory structure of the system still eludes me.
 
Old 05-07-2011, 09:11 AM   #5
MTK358
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Are you confused about what files/directories are, or about the way they are organized in a linux system?
 
Old 05-07-2011, 09:39 AM   #6
carltm
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Location: Canton, MI
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Hey Weapon S, it sounds like something stressed you out enough that
you jumped to Linux. Um, I guess that's good, but just realize that
being tired doesn't leave you in the best frame of mind to start
something new. I'm glad to see you plan to get some sleep first!

The paradigm for users and filesystems? Basically it's all designed
for use by multiple people to access the same files and to limit
what each person is allowed to do. That makes perfect sense for
anyone from a background in real multiuser systems. It doesn't
make sense for anyone with a background in DOS or Windows prior
to version 2000.

In the old DOS and Windows systems everyone was god. They could
update the system, change configuration files, update drivers
and sometimes (unless it was NT) they could have full access to
other people's files. This is the problem solved by Linux having
multiple users and groups. Permissions can be granted to the
owner, a particular group and anyone else. For each of these
three parties you can grant read, write and/or execute access.
You can guess that anything to do with the system executables,
drivers, and system configuration cannot be changed by normal
users. A given user may choose to not let anyone else have
read access to their files. You may create a group of web
admins and give only them read and write permission to the web
files, while others have only read permission. You get the idea.

Before I wish you good luck, can I ask why Debian? I really
like Debian, but I'm not sure that it's the best fit for
someone just starting out in Linux. If you're going to use
this for a workstation, consider using LMDE (that's Linux
Mint Debian Edition). It is Debian with some things pre-
configured, like access to proprietary drivers and multimedia
packages.

And for professional help, just drop your parrot and pick
up a penguin. I'm sure you'll do well. ;-)

Good luck!
 
Old 05-07-2011, 09:59 AM   #7
carltm
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About files and the directory structure...the only thing special
to know about Linux is that almost everything is a file. That
includes what you typically think of as a file, a directory,
the kernel, any device drivers, etc.

The directory structure is hierarchical, which just means that
all files share the same root. For example, on other systems
you may have files under "C:\" or "D:\". In Linux they are all
under "/" no matter what device they are stored on.

If you're interested, you can also read up on the Linux Filesystem
Hierarchy. This is a standard way to group files based on criteria
such as whether or not they are needed to boot the system, whether
or not they are updated frequently and whether or not normal users
need write permissions. It's a good idea to at least look at this
info, even if you don't memorize the details.

http://tldp.org/LDP/Linux-Filesystem...Hierarchy.html
 
Old 05-09-2011, 06:35 AM   #8
Weapon S
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Thanks very much. I think I understand the file part now. I didn't know something like LMDE existed. It sounds good. I had trouble because even Xubuntu was a little heavy for the attic-ware I'm installing on.
I'm not sure I like the idea of a Xfce + Debian Romeo. I've heard from both that they break (something) once in a while. One of the reasons I chose Linux (and Debian Squeeze in particular) is stability.
At the moment I'm very slowly and noobishly getting along with the Debian I have now.
 
  


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