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Old 01-28-2018, 01:00 PM   #1
haphaeu
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Which distros use systemd boot (gummiboot) by default?


Hi,
as title says - can you please tell if you know of a distro installer that uses systemd boot by default?

AFAIK only Arch and Manjaro <= 16 use that.

Reason I'm asking is that my "problematic" laptop doesn't seem to like grub and the only way I've managed to make it boot a linux USB was using one with systemd boot. But that limits my options of changing distros of even maintaining my laptop - now I'm using Manjaro on it, but newer installer use grub and then won't boot if I need...

So, if you know of something, please let me know so I can increase my list of options.

Thanks!
 
Old 01-28-2018, 03:27 PM   #2
ChuangTzu
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https://lmddgtfy.net/?q=what%20linux...or%20installer
 
Old 01-28-2018, 08:34 PM   #3
AwesomeMachine
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Considering grub rules the boot loader world, I strongly advise, at least as of now, to configure grub to boot an EFI system. Gummiboot is an EFI boot manager. Grub can be used as the same thing. To boot the laptop with any distro, turn off secure boot, bring up the bios boot menu and select 'legacy'.

Then, follow on of the many tutorials on using grub to boot an EFI system.
 
Old 01-29-2018, 07:06 AM   #4
fatmac
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I have used lilo & syslinux as alternatives to grub, might be worth checking if either will work on yours.
 
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Old 01-29-2018, 08:39 AM   #5
haphaeu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuangTzu View Post

Have you tried your link? Youíve created a circular reference since first hit is this thread
 
Old 01-29-2018, 08:41 AM   #6
haphaeu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AwesomeMachine View Post
Considering grub rules the boot loader world, I strongly advise, at least as of now, to configure grub to boot an EFI system. Gummiboot is an EFI boot manager. Grub can be used as the same thing. To boot the laptop with any distro, turn off secure boot, bring up the bios boot menu and select 'legacy'.

Then, follow on of the many tutorials on using grub to boot an EFI system.
You’ve no idea how much time I spent fiddling around with grub and EFI boot. it is not a setup issue, grub just doesn’t work in my system while systemd boot does out of the box.
 
Old 01-30-2018, 03:18 PM   #7
redfox2807
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Why don't you just install systemd-boot on your current linux install? Boot from a pen drive, chroot into your current install and install the boot loader.
 
Old 01-31-2018, 02:18 AM   #8
haphaeu
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Originally Posted by redfox2807 View Post
Why don't you just install systemd-boot on your current linux install? Boot from a pen drive, chroot into your current install and install the boot loader.
That is exactly what I have done so far and how I installed Linux on it. For now it is running nice and smooth.

But what I'm after here is an easier and quicker way to re-do this in the future in case I need it. Hopefully I won't need it, but you never know...

And if/when the day comes that I must for some reason re-install linux on it, I'd very much prefer something that just works so I can carry on with my life instead of wasting time hand installing things on low level =)

So the question remains: which distros uses system boot by default in their installer?

And yes, I've tried to search for it in internet, but all the fuzz around systemd sort of overwhelms the search results so I couldn't find any specific list for it. Ideally I'd like to see a table comparing distros and one column of that table is which boot loader comes in the installer ISO.
 
Old 01-31-2018, 02:49 AM   #9
ondoho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haphaeu View Post
And yes, I've tried to search for it in internet, but all the fuzz around systemd sort of overwhelms the search results so I couldn't find any specific list for it.
your search-fu is poor.
this search searches for the exact string "systemd-boot". from the distros that published pages about it you should be able to get the desired info.

sometimes no search results (or a circular reference) also is the correct answer.
 
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Old 01-31-2018, 03:09 AM   #10
redfox2807
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I'm not sure if it is used by any distro by default at the moment as grub is a de facto standard for linux EFI, but near every distro provides a package of systemd-boot. So the best way for you might be installing a new installation on a separate partition, skipping boot loader installation, then loading to the current installation, chrooting to the new one, and setting up the new installation from there. Btw that's exactly what I do currently even though I don't have issues with a boot loader. Moving to a new 'home' (not home partition =) is an extensive process to me.
 
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Old 01-31-2018, 08:42 AM   #11
haphaeu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
sometimes no search results (or a circular reference) also is the correct answer.

Iíll take that as the answer - only Arch linux uses it.
 
  


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