LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices


View Poll Results: Longest time for your computer without reinstalling Linux
Less than 1 year 8 14.55%
1 year - 2 years 14 25.45%
2 years - 3 years 12 21.82%
3 years - 4 years 8 14.55%
5 years or more 13 23.64%
Voters: 55. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 11-02-2009, 02:54 PM   #16
business_kid
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2006
Location: Ireland
Distribution: Slackware, RPi OS, Mint & Android
Posts: 12,855

Rep: Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677Reputation: 1677

When I was designing hardware in 2002, I had a pcb designed for me by a guy who had the same slackware box for 8 years at that point. Libs were becoming a problem, and he was looking to update some packages but he had cad, and eagle software on it and it was a work box for him. That's the longest I heard of. I never managed that myself - too many kids around.
 
Old 11-02-2009, 02:57 PM   #17
m_shroom
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Queen Charlotte B. C. Canada
Distribution: openSUSE 11.1
Posts: 42

Rep: Reputation: 15
Distro and hardware upgrades keep me in the 1 to 2 year range
 
Old 11-02-2009, 03:12 PM   #18
hans51
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: Cambodia
Distribution: suse
Posts: 36
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 16
I have never been forced to a Linux reinstall, but I enjoy the new feature richer versions on my laptops and thus I reinstall Linux in the newest available versions. While my opensuse linux offers upgrade without reinstall, I prefer a clean install of a newer version over an upgrade on existing system.

Linux is progressing so fast that a 1-2 year full reinstall with always newest features and SW / OS version is well worth the efforts.
 
Old 11-02-2009, 03:16 PM   #19
smeezekitty
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Location: Washington U.S.
Distribution: M$ Windows / Debian / Ubuntu / DSL / many others
Posts: 2,339

Rep: Reputation: 231Reputation: 231Reputation: 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by hans51 View Post
I have never been forced to a Linux reinstall, but I enjoy the new feature richer versions on my laptops and thus I reinstall Linux in the newest available versions. While my opensuse linux offers upgrade without reinstall, I prefer a clean install of a newer version over an upgrade on existing system.

Linux is progressing so fast that a 1-2 year full reinstall with always newest features and SW / OS version is well worth the efforts.
return FALSE;
 
Old 11-02-2009, 06:19 PM   #20
King_DuckZ
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2009
Location: Rome, IT
Distribution: Sabayon
Posts: 61

Rep: Reputation: 2
I can't really answer as I'm new to Linux (I got it on my new laptop since when I bought it 6 months ago). Since then I reinstalled 4 or 5 distros in order to find the one I like, and now I got Mandriva and Fedora running flawlessly in spite of my nose sticking in system files all the time.
Only once the bugged Mandriva packet manager removed KDE and other important stuff as it tought it was "orphaned", but I was still able to boot from shell and fix it - I'm on that same install right now.

Speaking of Win, I've been a Win 2000 user for a long time, but I used to reinstall roughly once every year, mostly to get a clean registry, less junk scattered in the system, and to get rid of pieces left around from uninstallers.
I believe Win 2000 to be a nice system, but considering you have to run PC Cillin, Explorer and 1000 other malwares, you can understand why I needed to cleanup.

I'll take the chance for a question: I heard that Mandriva 2010 wil come out REALLY soon, will I have to reinstall my system in order to update to it? This is my first update to a higher version!
 
Old 11-02-2009, 07:25 PM   #21
archtoad6
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Houston, TX (usa)
Distribution: MEPIS, Debian, Knoppix,
Posts: 4,727
Blog Entries: 15

Rep: Reputation: 234Reputation: 234Reputation: 234
I ran SmoothWall Express on an old PII box w/ about 128MB of RAM until the magic smoke escaped from the pwr. supply. (I actually saw the magic smoke escape. )
 
Old 11-02-2009, 08:24 PM   #22
Zetec
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Distribution: Debian, Ubuntu, W7, openSUSE, Centos
Posts: 152

Rep: Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by centosboy View Post
Code:
[root@mxxx etc]# uptime
 16:15:53 up 551 days, 22:52, 16 users,  load average: 7.40, 6.55, 6.59

yes this is real...been up and running since the day it was installed..


this too
Code:
[root@lxxx lps]# uptime
 16:17:21 up 777 days, 23:29,  1 user,  load average: 1.64, 1.13, 1.22
Without taking this too off topic.

In my limited linux knowledge isn't having a server up for so long a security risk as your not using a newer kernel?

I pre-empt you answer could depend on what the server is doing but would appreciate your POV anyway.
 
Old 11-02-2009, 08:49 PM   #23
nigelc
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Sydney, Australia
Distribution: Mageia 7
Posts: 393
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 80
well I have quite an old version of Fedora still waiting for to it crash or become nonfunctional.
Am able to get to archives to install software If I chose.

this is what uname shows:
Linux localhost.localdomain 2.6.20-1.2320.fc5 #1 Tue Jun 12 18:50:38 EDT 2007 i686 athlon i386 GNU/Linux

When I worked at Compac just before it was taken over by HP there were the so-called experts that said they installed windows every year. Whilst installing xp it has to reboot several times, then there is the updates + all the software. All this takes over an hour. Then there are anti virus updates etc.
 
Old 11-02-2009, 08:57 PM   #24
archtoad6
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Houston, TX (usa)
Distribution: MEPIS, Debian, Knoppix,
Posts: 4,727
Blog Entries: 15

Rep: Reputation: 234Reputation: 234Reputation: 234
In the W2k days, the only half joking advice was to re-install "Winders" every 6 months whether it needs it or not.
 
Old 11-02-2009, 10:35 PM   #25
sundialsvcs
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 9,140
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227Reputation: 3227
I haven't "reinstalled" Linux on any of my boxes since the day that I put Linux into service on any of them. Nor do I plan to. Obviously I do keep the various systems reasonably up-to-date, although since all of them are "inward facing" I don't even do that as much as I probably ought to.

Even the Windows (XP-SP2) boxes have not been updated in several years now. When you don't run as Administrator on the boxes, and don't run any of the so-called "anti-virus" (sic...) software on any of them, and you do have a full and current (Microsoft Backup) backup of everything that's on them, well, I just let 'em do their jobs... as they have done, literally, for many years.
 
Old 11-02-2009, 11:48 PM   #26
raskin
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: France
Distribution: approximately NixOS (http://nixos.org)
Posts: 1,900

Rep: Reputation: 69
Rolling-release distribution with rollbacks allows me to keep installation continuity indefenitely - until I kill the notebook hardware... And it is currently x86, so the next one will be installed with different architecture (I hope that ARM will be enough for me, but if it will be x86, it will have >4G memory and use amd64 mode).
 
Old 11-03-2009, 05:03 AM   #27
DragonSlayer48DX
Registered User
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,454
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 75
Every 3 years, when a new LTS version is released for Ubuntu. My personal preference is a clean install. Kinda 'set in my ways' from the early days of DOS.

Cheers
 
Old 11-03-2009, 07:00 AM   #28
Caesar Tjalbo
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Ņuņoa
Distribution: KaOS
Posts: 94

Rep: Reputation: 16
OS installed November 21, 2007 at 02:31. Last dist-upgrade 2 days ago. Rolling release FTW.
 
Old 11-03-2009, 07:11 AM   #29
xcristi
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 35

Rep: Reputation: 16
1. aprox one year and a half
2. a fresh reinstall for a new version of Slackware (the old distro was ok, just trying to see something new )
 
Old 11-03-2009, 01:43 PM   #30
Bobber47
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Location: San Francisco, CA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Vector, DSL, Puppy
Posts: 10

Rep: Reputation: 1
There certainly is a benefit to re-installation for Windows maintenance (disk/registry related performance declines), but I have never re-installed Linux for maintenance: I have only done new installations of recent distro versions. Because I adopted Ubuntu as my standard OS on most of my systems, I initially matched the 6-month cycle of upgrades available, but have reverted to the 1.5-3 year cycle of patch support to reduce labor (though it is fairly easy). I'm currently running 8.04 LTS and 8.10, but I'm tempted to upgrade to take advantage of the advances since then. So installation has always been voluntary.

Last edited by Bobber47; 11-03-2009 at 01:47 PM. Reason: error
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Longest Uptime for Linux, yours not somebody else's. dalek Linux - General 64 03-12-2015 11:11 AM
What is the longest time spent without using a GUI? crypticlogic Linux - General 14 12-20-2007 09:34 AM
longest linux filename unkie888 Linux - Newbie 9 08-18-2007 10:43 PM
synchronize linux domain time to workstation sunnyee Linux - Newbie 2 06-25-2004 04:37 AM
longest time awake without sleeping? nixel General 25 05-09-2004 01:42 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:00 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration