LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 09-24-2003, 04:55 PM   #1
icunow
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: windows os
Posts: 27

Rep: Reputation: 15
Understanding Linux Terms


ok , i am kinda new to linux, and would like to know a few things .

1. what do you guys mean when you are talking about codes.

2. on windows os you have your drives listed in my computer, is there drives like that in linux. where do you go lets say if you have a cd in your cd-rom.

3. how do you get to the page where you can type in things like #1/bin/bash. etc.

i guess thats all for know but i still need some more help
 
Old 09-24-2003, 05:02 PM   #2
XavierP
Moderator
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Kent, England
Distribution: Debian Testing
Posts: 19,192
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 474Reputation: 474Reputation: 474Reputation: 474Reputation: 474
2. the cd is in /dev/cdrom and is known a /mnt/cdrom - you would mount it by typing mount /mnt/cdrom and eject it by first typing umount /mnt/cdrom. Linux doesn't use c: d: etc, all is visible in your explorer (Konqueror, Nautilus, etc).

3. to type commands in the command line, open a terminal - just like opening a dos window.
 
Old 09-24-2003, 05:02 PM   #3
david_ross
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Scotland
Distribution: Slackware, RedHat, Debian
Posts: 12,047

Rep: Reputation: 66
1) Depends on the context
2) Not all partitions are mounted automatically. To see your partitions run "fdisk -l". To mount a new drive like your cdrom:
mount /mnt/cdrom
This assumes you have a cdrm entry in /etc/fstab. You can also use /etc/fstab to mount partitions on boot.
3) I assume you mean how do you write a script? The fisrt line starting with "#!" tells the shell which interpreter to use. To create a script - just put the text in a file and save it. To execute it run the shell with the filename as an argument eg:
bash my-bash-script.sh

You can also make it executeable using:
chmod o+x /path/to/my-bash-script.sh
Then run it using:
/path/to/my-bash-script.sh
Or if it is placed in your path - just:
my-bash-script.sh
 
Old 09-24-2003, 05:08 PM   #4
Mara
Moderator
 
Registered: Feb 2002
Location: Grenoble
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 9,684

Rep: Reputation: 230Reputation: 230Reputation: 230
Re: Understanding Linux Terms

Quote:
Originally posted by icunow
.
1. what do you guys mean when you are talking about codes.
Probably code or source code. Source code is special text written by programmers (in so called programming languages) that's later compiled to become executables you know.

Quote:
2. on windows os you have your drives listed in my computer, is there drives like that in linux. where do you go lets say if you have a cd in your cd-rom.
Where you want, in fact. In Unix systems, all disks, partitions and other resources form one tree (which is not really a tree because links and so on, in fact) - like one drive in Windows. To this tree you can mount (add) a different partition, cdrom, floppy, shared resources... When mounted, resources look like they were in this partition. For example, I have my cdrom drive contents mounted as /mnt/cdrom. When I enter the directory, I see everything that's on the cd. If you have a file 'example' on it, I've got /mnt/cdrom/example.

Quote:
3. how do you get to the page where you can type in things like #1/bin/bash. etc.
Hmm..Do you mean a console? When booting to the text mode, you just log in and have it. When you're in GUI, you need to run one of the terminal programs, like xterm, rxvt and so on.

Last edited by Mara; 09-24-2003 at 05:10 PM.
 
Old 09-24-2003, 05:11 PM   #5
Mara
Moderator
 
Registered: Feb 2002
Location: Grenoble
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 9,684

Rep: Reputation: 230Reputation: 230Reputation: 230
david_ross, we have completely different answers for the same questions!
 
Old 09-24-2003, 05:17 PM   #6
david_ross
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Scotland
Distribution: Slackware, RedHat, Debian
Posts: 12,047

Rep: Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally posted by Mara
david_ross, we have completely different answers for the same questions!
They say variety is the spice of life!

It is difficult to be specific with such broad questions and all answers are perfectly valid. icunow please don;t hesitate to ask if you are still unsure. It certainly wouldn't be the first time I rambled of in the wrong direction.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Linux Terms jesman_dell Linux - Newbie 8 01-08-2004 04:44 PM
any linux dictionary/explanation of terms out there ? yanar99 Linux - Newbie 3 12-15-2003 08:37 AM
Understanding Linux better learninlinux LinuxQuestions.org Member Intro 1 10-03-2003 03:56 PM
Linux Terms NSKL Linux - General 8 07-15-2003 05:17 AM
linux terms blistfix Linux - Newbie 2 06-24-2001 02:36 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:28 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration