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Old 06-14-2013, 01:47 AM   #1
Netnovice
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Procb benchmark - handles >1 core?


I have been using ‘ProcBench’ for benchmarking various machines. It has the advantage of being multi-platform. I am interested in testing a range of machines including very old, and very low spec.

It seems fine for my purposes but there is one area of confusion. It is not clear if the utility tests multiple cores. From what I can make out, it doesn’t. A dual core AMD E1-1200 scores well below my feeble single core Atom n455. I have enough machines tested to make some comparisons but I a am not sure if multiple cores are tested.

Anyone have a clue? It’s a small thing and I can factor in for multiple cores if needed. I just wanna what it’s doing. The READ.ME does not say.

Thanks.
 
Old 06-14-2013, 07:40 PM   #2
syg00
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I have no idea, but should be easy enough to tell from a running instance.
If you have a multi-core (more than 2) machine, use cgroups to constrain the benchmark to a subset of engines. Similarly constrain your monitoring session(s) to another separate subset. Then just have a look.
Been doing it this way for years.
 
Old 06-15-2013, 10:22 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syg00 View Post
I have no idea, but should be easy enough to tell from a running instance.
If you have a multi-core (more than 2) machine, use cgroups to constrain the benchmark to a subset of engines. Similarly constrain your monitoring session(s) to another separate subset. Then just have a look.
Been doing it this way for years.

Ah! Logical. I did not know of cgroups. Just looked it up.
Sigh. I have much to learn. Thanks. I will investigate. Much obliged!
 
  


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