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Ellops 03-29-2006 09:19 PM

Partitioning Software
 
do you know any decent partitioning tool?

I have some fat and ntfs partitions I want to delete or convert, without switching to godam' M$win so it must support Fat and NTFS manipuation/creation.

thanks ;)

chrisortiz 03-29-2006 10:20 PM

qtpartedhttp://qtparted.sourceforge.net/

it will create fat, but doesn't have complete ntfs support.

syg00 03-29-2006 10:21 PM

How did you install Slack ???.
You (probably) used fdisk to set up your partitions then - it'll do this job just as easily.

As an aside, fat{32} is supported natively in Linux - just use the partition(s) as any other. NTFS can be safely read, but update is problematic - can be deleted in {c}fdisk.

Ellops 03-29-2006 10:35 PM

Ahh. yes ur right, I think that will do just fine... I'd installed slack on partions I already had,

I installed qtparted however, (gui's convenience) but it closes with segmentation fault, when selecting hda to see the partitions.. (?)

Thank u both

Ellops 03-29-2006 10:37 PM

I also downloaded ntfsprogs (required for qtparted) and I think is exactly what I want ;)

syg00 03-29-2006 11:01 PM

Think again if you expect to be able to write NTFS.
The ntfsprogs people are updating their (excellent) code all the time, but you'll need to be at 2.6.15 (or better) for the native kernel drivers to be any use. When I last tested (2.6.15), creating new files was still missing - maybe look at the fuse interface for that.

As I said, read access is fine.

J.W. 03-29-2006 11:07 PM

Just to echo syg00's comments, the ability in Linux to write to NTFS should still be considered in the experimental stage. It may work, but don't trust any critical data to it yet. Personally, the only file system that I consider to have equal read and write capabilities in both Windows and Linux is FAT32. Not that it's as good as other file systems, but if you need a reliable, common FS to use between Windows and Linux, at least at this point in time FAT32 is the only way to go.

Just my 2 cents

Ellops 03-29-2006 11:11 PM

your right,
I'm using captive-ntfs to write on ntfs drives and i have 2.6.15.5 kernel

but i mostly need ntfsprogs to manipulate my existing ntfs partitions or convert thenm to fat for linux-win use.


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