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sublynx 10-18-2003 08:05 PM

looking for good cd burning software
 
Hi,

Im looking for a good cd burning application for gnome. is there any apps out there that i can drag and drop/load a directory of mp3/ogg files and it will burn them to a cd (not the mp3, but convert them so i can play them in a regular cd player). ive tried out several packages so far including xcdroast, but all i can get that to do it burn the mp3's to a cd.

Ciccio 10-18-2003 08:21 PM

hum.... perhaps you might want to use a decoder to decode from mp3 to wav, and then record the wav to Audio CD format (windows calls it cda) You will need to creat a track for each file...


And after you are done with that, mkisofs and cdrecord should be more than enough.

megaspaz 10-18-2003 08:26 PM

gnome toaster and eroaster will auto decode mp3 files, but you still need the libraries. i think they also both can drag and drop files from the desktop environment to the application.

Ciccio 10-18-2003 08:42 PM

Hey, your are using Linux because it gives you freedom! It does not hold you up in the desktop giving you poor access throu CLI. USE IT WELL.

aren't those libraries built by default?

megaspaz 10-18-2003 08:50 PM

if you think anyone wants to spend time with:

lame --decode filename1.mp3 filename2.mp3
etc....

and then use the other commands to burn an audio cd, then.... uh hum.....

m'kay?

sublynx 10-18-2003 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Ciccio
Hey, your are using Linux because it gives you freedom! It does not hold you up in the desktop giving you poor access throu CLI. USE IT WELL.

aren't those libraries built by default?

if that is your definition of linux freedom, i would rather be a slave, i was aware of the procedures mentioned in your post but spending the time to manually convert each file then burn it isnt what i was looking for as clearly mentioned in my post.

Nechos 10-18-2003 09:17 PM

i think K3B does good job...

Fascistchicken 10-18-2003 09:28 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by megaspaz
if you think anyone wants to spend time with:

lame --decode filename1.mp3 filename2.mp3
etc....

and then use the other commands to burn an audio cd, then.... uh hum.....

m'kay?

if you did do it that way and learned how to write a small script you could do it any way you wanted to do it
a little more time to start with, but save yourself time in the long run

Ciccio 10-18-2003 10:35 PM

As I said, your are FREE to choose. You can use the CLI, you can use the GUI. that's entirely up to you... From my point of view, the CLi is better for some things (like that) and the GUI is better for others, for example an IRC client (you know, those colorful, scriptful clients like the ircap for windows)

Anyway, if you dislike my comments, then please disregard them. There is no need to get sarcastic now... is there? Because if there is PLEASE tell me... I love being sarcastic (as you can see).

I prefer to use mkisofs and cdrecord, it gives me a better control of what I'm doing, and there is no need of 'configuring'. Once you get use to the options you actually manage to type them without thinking...

Anyway... man, live in peace!,

farewell

megaspaz 10-18-2003 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Fascistchicken
if you did do it that way and learned how to write a small script you could do it any way you wanted to do it
a little more time to start with, but save yourself time in the long run

and how do you figure writing a script will save you time? you still have to tell the script what mp3s to decode which means typing. save yourself time over grabbing a bunch of mp3 files and dragging them to an app window? uh huh....

Cimmerian 10-19-2003 04:32 AM

I use k3b. It has a philosophy of implementing as many features as possible, which can make it a little "bloated", but it has an easy to use/understand GUI and can do everything you want it to do and more.

Fascistchicken 10-19-2003 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by megaspaz
and how do you figure writing a script will save you time? you still have to tell the script what mp3s to decode which means typing. save yourself time over grabbing a bunch of mp3 files and dragging them to an app window? uh huh....
the're called variables, its the magic of computers

Ciccio 10-19-2003 01:30 PM

Hey, guys. lets drop this. This GUI vs CLI will never end. Lets just say that some think that GUI saves time and that is what makes it better. And others say that CLI gives them better control over tyhings, and that is why it's better.

It's like a post I've read recently: what's best? Kde or gnome? You know... it's neverending.

Fascistchicken 10-19-2003 06:38 PM

its not gui vs. cli, its just you could do it better yourself...
i know that a lot of gui programs support drag and drop and also execute scripts on command, like nautilus, so you could write a script, then use it with your gui program of choice, rather than use a lot of separate programs that are redundant, and that inhibit functionality. so spend a little time now, and save a lot more later...
i don't think it would take more than a few minutes to write a script and thats shorter than the time it would take to find download and install a separate program.
besides, the scripts probably already been written...
so look for that

Cimmerian 10-19-2003 07:16 PM

It would have been fun to take 100 random linux users and told them to write a script for burning mp3 to a normal audio-cd and measure the average time they spent on this task... And then make them download and install some package of, say k3b and make the same audio-cd.

megaspaz 10-19-2003 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Fascistchicken
its not gui vs. cli, its just you could do it better yourself...
i know that a lot of gui programs support drag and drop and also execute scripts on command, like nautilus, so you could write a script, then use it with your gui program of choice, rather than use a lot of separate programs that are redundant, and that inhibit functionality. so spend a little time now, and save a lot more later...
i don't think it would take more than a few minutes to write a script and thats shorter than the time it would take to find download and install a separate program.
besides, the scripts probably already been written...
so look for that

yes, you could. i've done this. i have a script that does all of this where you can multiselect a bunch of files in konq and open the files in the script. but newbs don't want to do this. it's still much easier to download a proggie that will do all this stuff for you.

J.I.L. 10-19-2003 07:46 PM

K3B gets my vote it is easy supports drag and drop and converts mp3 to wave for cd burning it is not too far off from the roxio stuff like easy cd creator for windblows.
You will have to enable scsi emulation for your cdrw although.

Fascistchicken 10-19-2003 08:55 PM

google search 0.31 seconds:

This is a script which can be used to create an audio cd from a bunch of mp3/oggs. It assumes your cd-recorder is set up properly. If not please refer to the many HOWTO's on the subject.

echo "---Audio-cd making script---"
echo "I hope you have no more than 74/80 min of tracks in this directory!"
echo ""
echo "########Recording the mp3's in this directory..########"
for I in *.mp3
do
mpg123 --cdr - "$I" | cdrecord speed=4 dev=0,0,0 -audio -pad -nofix -
done
echo "#########Recording the oggs...###########"
for I in *.ogg
do
ogg123 -d au -f - "$I" | cdrecord speed=4 dev=0,0,0 -audio -pad -nofix -
done
cdrecord dev=0,0,0 -fix

You might have to change the device parameter for cdrecord if your cd-writer is in a different location. Also, you'll need mpg123 and ogg123 installed.

from http://users.aber.ac.uk/ddr1/howto/

megaspaz 10-19-2003 08:57 PM

* friggin' double post *

megaspaz 10-19-2003 08:59 PM

and how do you check if you have more than 74/80 minutes of music? mine was pretty much like that, but it didn't check to see if what i chose was going to go over the limit or not. i don't use that script anymore.

Fascistchicken 10-19-2003 09:08 PM

well, i dont know about oggs but mp3's have the timestamp in them
extract , grep and add i suppose

CanadianPenguin 10-19-2003 11:01 PM

Or put them all in XMMS, highlight them and it will tell you the cumulative time at the bottom.

megaspaz 10-19-2003 11:27 PM

yes. but then you've brought in another seperate program into the equation. :D
most of the cd burning proggies i've seen have their own file managers and you really don't need to drag and drop from the desktop as you can drag and drop files within the programs file managers to the burn list. and then a few will decode mp3s in that list into a form that can be burned into an audio cd. and they'll also have the size of the burn project listed so you can remove or add files. all in one program. so like what fascistchicken was talking about, it's all contained in one program. well not really since these programs call other libraries (programs maybe), but to the user it's looks like one program is doing this. even if you wanted to write a shell script to do this, it's not as trivial as what was made out here and i still don't see any time saving doing one way or the other except for the time spent trying to write a monolithic script that will call everything within itself.

frieza 10-19-2003 11:31 PM

i used xcdroast which is a frontend to cdparanoia although i havn't had my cd burner going since the processor on that machine kinda died (no big deal since the machine was in the scrap heap anyways)

Fascistchicken 10-20-2003 01:04 AM

i assume by monolithic you mean unusually large or complicated
really i didnt have the time to seach the answer for the question of the playlength time but i doubt its that hard and if its never been written ,well its there to be written, so somebody here do it and contribute to the open source community, since thats what the great ga-noo is all about
i saw some program on a google search called mp3info that gives the time
not here on my computer though
its just turtles all the way down anyways

Ciccio 10-21-2003 08:48 AM

I don't knwo MP3 or OGG format standards, but I am sure there is a simple, or perhaps not so simple way to see the length of a file. Perhaps checking the bitrate against the actyual file size... that shouldn't be so hard... the bitrate is usually stored in the description of the file (along with the title and many other things).

On the other hand, instead of recording the tracks directly, you can create an ISO image and then check the size of the Image and burn it.

Or even simpler:

for I in *.mp3
do
total= total + Ždu $IŽ (here you need to strip the filename part. I'm not on linux but I think that a simple grep should do it)
if total < 700000000
mpg123 --cdr - "$I" | cdrecord speed=4 dev=0,0,0 -audio -pad -nofix -
fi
done

It's my first script in over six months, so I'm not sure that would work. but the idea is still the same.


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