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Old 06-02-2016, 11:47 AM   #16
szboardstretcher
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yaractys View Post
In Markdown, the lack of ability to indent paragraphs makes it impossible to visually separate them *without* a "double newline", as indentation is interpreted as a code block. Normally, I wouldn't care, but.. *character dialogue*. Each character's speech is a new paragraph a la typical conventions, but I can't afford to leave a blank line between each one to be able to visually distinguish them. Without some way to indent, "single newlines" are all but invisible, and I am restricted to using the word "said" (or something like that) for *every single line*. In two-character dialogue, this sounds very wrong.
Look at, and compare, Cormac Mcarthy's "The Road" and James Joyce's "Ulysses"

Mccarthy sometimes uses newlines instead of tabs to seperate paragraphs and sections, and Joyce uses hyphens to indicate dialogue. Both authors sometimes don't even bother telling you who is talking, you just have to guess. And Mccarthy doesn't like using 'said' hardly at all.

You might be able to combine the two styles to make something very enjoyable to read.
 
Old 06-02-2016, 12:42 PM   #17
Yaractys
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Quote:
Originally Posted by szboardstretcher View Post
Look at, and compare, Cormac Mcarthy's "The Road" and James Joyce's "Ulysses"

Mccarthy sometimes uses newlines instead of tabs to seperate paragraphs and sections, and Joyce uses hyphens to indicate dialogue. Both authors sometimes don't even bother telling you who is talking, you just have to guess. And Mccarthy doesn't like using 'said' hardly at all.

You might be able to combine the two styles to make something very enjoyable to read.
What do you mean by "uses newlines instead of tabs to separate paragraphs and sections"? If you mean using blank lines between paragraphs, I already do that - for section breaks only. My screen is too small to throw in blank lines between every paragraph... How does McCarthy distinguish paragraph breaks and section breaks from each other? I love the idea of hyphens for dialogue (I would still include quotation marks on top), but markdown interprets an initial hyphen as a bullet point.

I keep running into the issue that what I want to write conflicts with Markdown's syntax, due to the fact that it has multiple options for each formatting job and hijacks way more characters than it needs to. Is there some language that is way more lightweight than Markdown? Or some way that I can whitelist 1/4 of Markdown's syntax elements and not export the rest?

I apologize if it seems like I'm shooting everything down; there have been some incredibly inventive ideas here. I just can't believe that what I'm looking for doesn't exist, when Wikipedia's list of lightweight markup languages is as ridiculously long as it is.
 
Old 06-02-2016, 01:28 PM   #18
szboardstretcher
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If you have a very clear idea of what you want and need, then you can just write your own markup parser. All of the markup languages are open source and there are many parsers and editors with source that you can look at.

Barring that, I suppose you could mess with the source of a markdown parser and remove the features you don't want.

I don't know of any that only implement 'part' of a standard or allow you to turn off 'parts' of the standard.
 
Old 08-16-2016, 04:34 AM   #19
getgoodgrade
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Thanks for exciting thread. I took from this thread several ideas.
 
  


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