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Old 09-27-2016, 11:05 AM   #16
dave@burn-it.co.uk
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What a load of piffle!
To start with my FIRE SAFE is a fire safe not any online crap and is hidden under a concrete floor with a rather thick door.
I would challenge you or anyone you know to try to get through my routers or try to crack my wireless encryption to access my machine - and I am not going to publish any details
Any online storage is only as secure as the company that runs it AND the staff that have access to your files. They have to legally be able to access them for national security reasons (and I don't agree with that bit but MI6 insists).
Google does not have a good reputation for security.
Hacking is not the biggest security risk, losing access to it is a far bigger danger.
 
Old 09-27-2016, 11:44 AM   #17
Timothy Miller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave@burn-it.co.uk View Post
I have never seen or had a problem in all the years they've been around and it was my life's work supporting computer systems in office environments.
Really? Because until recently I supported a company that pretty much exclusively was MS, including office, and I can't remember a single day that went by that I didn't have tickets for corrupt pst's. SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO glad I don't do that anymore.
 
Old 09-27-2016, 11:48 AM   #18
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave@burn-it.co.uk View Post
What a load of piffle!
To start with my FIRE SAFE is a fire safe not any online crap and is hidden under a concrete floor with a rather thick door.
I would challenge you or anyone you know to try to get through my routers or try to crack my wireless encryption to access my machine - and I am not going to publish any details
Any online storage is only as secure as the company that runs it AND the staff that have access to your files. They have to legally be able to access them for national security reasons (and I don't agree with that bit but MI6 insists). Google does not have a good reputation for security.
Sorry, you're totally wrong, period. If you don't CHOOSE to do these things, that's fine, but don't bury your head in the sand and make claims that are just plain wrong. You can hide whatever you want in your 'safe'...and if someone claims 'national security' over what you're doing, do you honestly think that a door is going to help keep it in?? And anyone with admin rights on another Windows machine can simply copy a PST file and import it...where is your security there??? And "wireless encryption"? You do realize that it's fairly trivial to crack such things, right? http://null-byte.wonderhowto.com/how...ck-ng-0148366/

Again, I PGP encrypt my files with a 4096 bit key. Want a copy of them? Fine...good luck getting into them. And again, if the NSA, Mi6 or whomever at that level wants into my files, they can most assuredly get into them. Making my life hard for pretty much no reason is pointless.
Quote:
Hacking is not the biggest security risk, losing access to it is a far bigger danger.
...which is why I can access my data from anywhere in the world, and delete it too, if I choose.
 
Old 09-27-2016, 01:27 PM   #19
dave@burn-it.co.uk
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There is no point discussing things with you if you just completely misinterpret everything.
The point was that anyone can access your data from "anywhere in the world" At least mine requires physical access to MY premises which legally requires a warrant and certainly is physically more secure than your online files.

Anyone even with admin rights would still have to access my machine. What does wireless encryption have to do with the discussion between Windows and Linux since they both use the same.

Where is your security when someone with access to your machine can break it and probably destroy your keys. I encrypt my files as well by the way. Yours will be available for hacking long before mine are.
 
Old 09-27-2016, 01:52 PM   #20
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave@burn-it.co.uk View Post
There is no point discussing things with you if you just completely misinterpret everything.
What, exactly, did I 'misinterpret'???
Quote:
The point was that anyone can access your data from "anywhere in the world" At least mine requires physical access to MY premises which legally requires a warrant and certainly is physically more secure than your online files.
Physically? Certainly, never argued that point. But you bring up "national security" issues, and at which point a warrant will go right out the window, and they will just come in and TAKE what they want/need to, period. Or do you think lack of a warrant would stop them, if they *REALLY* thought you were up to something? Did I 'misinterpret' it when you claimed some concrete and a door will keep things safe in the event of a national security threat, which is what anyone would read into your post?

You're using a .PST file...by its nature, it CANNOT BE ENCRYPTED and still work. You can make BACKUPS and encrypt those, but your Windows machine and PST file will always be weak, period.
Quote:
Anyone even with admin rights would still have to access my machine.
..which wouldn't be much of an issue, since you're using Windows for your Outlook and a wonky .PST file
Quote:
What does wireless encryption have to do with the discussion between Windows and Linux since they both use the same.
You brought it up, and boasted about how 'secure' it is, about how no one could 'get through my routers or try to crack my wireless encryption to access my machine', right? WPA keys aren't hard to break, so once on your internal LAN, getting into a Windows machine isn't hard, is it?
Quote:
Where is your security when someone with access to your machine can break it and probably destroy your keys. I encrypt my files as well by the way. Yours will be available for hacking long before mine are.
Never said they wouldn't be AVAILABLE as files, did I? Do some basic research on encryption; Assuming no side channel attacks, special prime factors or as-yet undiscovered algorithmic weakness it would require approximately between 2^140 and 2^150 operations to crack a 4096 bit RSA public key by factorization using the general number field sieve algorithm - a fast way to factorize large numbers. A 768 bit RSA key took two years on a cluster having close to 100 computers; the same factoring would take a couple hundred years to crack a 4096 bit RSA key on a large cluster and a couple million years on an average desktop system. I think I can risk it.

Do whatever you want. Keep things etched on a stone tablet in a language you invented, surrounded by a moat of acid for all I care. Doesn't make anything else bad, but your perceptions of data security indicate you've not worked much in that field.
 
Old 09-27-2016, 02:38 PM   #21
dave@burn-it.co.uk
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Can we have a negative reputation button.

I said that your files would be available to crack before mine.

No-one said that it would stop national security from getting them, but it would certainly stop idiots.

You are completely wrong about perceptions of data security. If the way you talk is anything to go by everybody should encrypt their speech so no-one can hack it.

Oh and by the way I had a hand in designing the security methods used in banks - for example, so stop trying to teach Grandma to suck eggs - she still has teeth.
 
Old 09-27-2016, 03:37 PM   #22
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I had read, last time I tried to get my work related, sorry there's no choice, MS Exchange emails read on my home machine, that there aren't any Linux solutions that reliably work. Evolution was the top contender at that time, depending on the version of Exchange on the server. Apparently, one has to pay Microsoft some sort of licensing fee for compatibility, or so I gleaned, which is why I have no problems using my iOS device to read Exchange emails, since Apple apparently pays to have it "just work".

None of the above is meant as an endorsement of any of the policies or devices or the merits thereof. It's only meant to answer the OPs original question. The answer is: lightweight or not, email client Exchange compatibility is a moving target that is difficult to reverse engineer for the open source community without really a whole lot of incentive. Sort of like iTunes compatibility....
 
Old 09-28-2016, 07:49 AM   #23
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave@burn-it.co.uk View Post
Can we have a negative reputation button.
You should be glad there is not one.
Quote:
I said that your files would be available to crack before mine. No-one said that it would stop national security from getting them, but it would certainly stop idiots.
Just stop. You were the one bringing up things like "national security", and now you say you just use your 'secure' methods to keep average idiots away. Which is it?
Quote:
You are completely wrong about perceptions of data security. If the way you talk is anything to go by everybody should encrypt their speech so no-one can hack it.
Never said any such thing, nor did I even infer it. YOU are the one spouting off about how 'secure' you are...when you are storing your data in a TOTALLY INSECURE format, shared over a Wifi connection? Wifi is inherently insecure, period...Windows even less so. I don't care if you make a copy, and encrypt it 1,000 times over with different keys. The SOURCE file remains insecure, on an insecure platform, on an insecure network. Period.

NO ONE who is serious about security would think your setup is secure against anyone but your next-door neighbor who may want to borrow your wifi connection. If you DID know the first thing about security, you'd know that there IS NO SUCH THING, unless you put your computer in a sealed room, and never connect it to anything, ever, for any reason. The best you can ever do is mitigate the risk.
Quote:
Oh and by the way I had a hand in designing the security methods used in banks - for example, so stop trying to teach Grandma to suck eggs - she still has teeth.
Yes...I'm SURE they called you in. Anyone who would store data in a proprietary unencrypted file, known to have issues, would be the top of my list.
 
Old 09-28-2016, 08:06 AM   #24
dijetlo
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Here's the gist of it.
If you think email is secure, you forget Uncle Sam is reading over your shoulder.
And if Uncle can do it... then who can't?

Pick the email client you like best (sounds like you might like Evince), keep your conversations vanilla and save all the felonious plotting for mobile face to face meetings in places with a lot of background noise.
Don't ask me how I know all this... just.... do it that way
 
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Old 09-28-2016, 03:02 PM   #25
c0wb0y
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Though I like the underlying OS in Linux and its tunability, the desktop apps are actually (subjectively) better in Windows. Music apps, video editors, email clients etc. I used to use KMail but it's buggy as hell. Don't know its current status. Plasma 5 looks promising but it crashes from time to time. Until I stick to JWM/Icewm, it makes life simpler.
 
Old 09-28-2016, 03:47 PM   #26
Timothy Miller
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c0wb0y View Post
Though I like the underlying OS in Linux and its tunability, the desktop apps are actually (subjectively) better in Windows. Music apps, video editors, email clients etc. I used to use KMail but it's buggy as hell. Don't know its current status. Plasma 5 looks promising but it crashes from time to time. Until I stick to JWM/Icewm, it makes life simpler.
Definitely subjectively.

I'll take my linux apps every day over Windows. Of course, being open source, MOST of the linux apps are capable of running on Windows too.
 
Old 09-29-2016, 01:01 AM   #27
ondoho
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developers of commercial apps (and most windows "freeware" is also commercial) obviously have a strong incentive to make their apps appear to be comfortable, safe and usable, providing sane defaults and easy-to-use wizards... yes, i sound like a commercial myself.

but...

that doesn't mean the app actually IS stable - you just don't see the bugs. until it craps out on you big time, and what do you do then?

otoh, i find the linux world sometimes lacks this incentive. after writing a good ultility, making it use sane, most common defaults should be a requirement.


edit:
clearly this has nothing to do with the loaded question of the op.
 
Old 09-29-2016, 01:53 PM   #28
c0wb0y
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ondoho View Post
developers of commercial apps (and most windows "freeware" is also commercial) obviously have a strong incentive to make their apps appear to be comfortable, safe and usable, providing sane defaults and easy-to-use wizards... yes, i sound like a commercial myself.

but...

that doesn't mean the app actually IS stable - you just don't see the bugs. until it craps out on you big time, and what do you do then?

otoh, i find the linux world sometimes lacks this incentive. after writing a good ultility, making it use sane, most common defaults should be a requirement.


edit:
clearly this has nothing to do with the loaded question of the op.
This is subjective (ie conjecture) as well. Open source brings the collective power of community. But that is not to say that it is the end all be all and bugs don't go unnoticed. Dont forget that closed source systems has access to open source ideas but not other way around.
 
Old 10-04-2016, 04:38 PM   #29
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No.
 
  


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