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Old 05-28-2016, 07:21 PM   #1
Gregg Bell
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Is it better to install software from the Ubuntu Software Center or Synaptic Package Manager?


I just got a new (used) computer running with Xubuntu 16:04LTS. I have tons of room on the hard drive and want to install a lot of software. Most of the software I want is in the Ubuntu Software Center but some is not. And most of what is in the Ubuntu Software Center is also in Synaptic. And I know software can be installed from the terminal. I want mostly ordinary stuff. GIMP, Gparted, Shutter, Kate, Sigil, Back in Time, Clipman. And I'm pretty low-tech. (The terminal still is not my strength.) So what's the optimal way for somebody like me to install software? Thanks.
 
Old 05-28-2016, 07:41 PM   #2
reinfro555
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I always use the terminal. It's faster and as simple as

sudo apt-get install packagename

Of course, recent buntus now uses apt as to apt-get

sudo apt install packagename

If synaptic doesn't have the package you want, use the software center and visa-versa.

In all fairness, use whichever is easier to you. GUI or terminal. Both will do the same thing and install packages on your system.

Last edited by reinfro555; 05-28-2016 at 08:29 PM.
 
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Old 05-29-2016, 04:36 AM   #3
seasons
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Quote:
Both will do the same thing and install packages on your system.
^Yeah, that.

If you're a seasoned Debian/buntu user that doesn't like typing, Synaptic's probably ideal, as you'll know the names of the packages you want or quickly be able to search them. The Software Center's better for discovering new software.
 
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Old 05-29-2016, 10:26 AM   #4
beachboy2
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Smile

Gregg,

I agree with reinfro555 and seasons.

If you know the name of the software you require, it is much faster to type the list in Terminal.

If you are unsure about the name of the software, look in Ubuntu Software Centre:

System > Administration > Ubuntu Software Centre.

The latter way is much slower because you are searching for packages and then installing each one separately.

Long-winded!

C'mon Gregg, man up and use the command line! You are a writer after all, so your fingers will be a blur in Terminal!

You know you can do it.
 
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Old 05-29-2016, 12:19 PM   #5
ardvark71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg Bell View Post
So what's the optimal way for somebody like me to install software?
Hi Gregg...

Just my opinion but I think the Software Center makes the process more a little more simple for the beginning user. However, I admit that I've not used it that much at all and don't know everything about it. I'm a Synaptic fan and I either is it or the command line to install software.

Regards...
 
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Old 05-29-2016, 01:22 PM   #6
offgridguy
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I agree with the other sentiments expressed already. I only use the software center to find the correct name and spelling of the packages I want.
 
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Old 05-29-2016, 01:49 PM   #7
beachboy2
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Gregg,

As offgridguy states:

Quote:
I only use the software center to find the correct name and spelling of the packages I want.
Let's say you want to install True Type Core Fonts from Microsoft and Back In Time, plus several other items whose names you already know, such as gimp, kate, shutter.

With the first 2, SC reports ttf-mscorefonts-installer and backintime-gnome (or backintime-kde).

In Terminal you would run:

Code:
sudo apt-get install ttf-mscorefonts-installer backintime-gnome gimp kate shutter
and install 5 for the price of 1.

Easy and much more efficient!
 
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Old 05-29-2016, 06:05 PM   #8
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reinfro555 View Post
I always use the terminal. It's faster and as simple as

sudo apt-get install packagename

Of course, recent buntus now uses apt as to apt-get

sudo apt install packagename

If synaptic doesn't have the package you want, use the software center and visa-versa.

In all fairness, use whichever is easier to you. GUI or terminal. Both will do the same thing and install packages on your system.
Thanks reinfro555. And thanks for mentioning apt vs apt-get. This new install has just apt and my old computer had apt-get.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 06:14 PM   #9
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seasons View Post
^Yeah, that.

If you're a seasoned Debian/buntu user that doesn't like typing, Synaptic's probably ideal, as you'll know the names of the packages you want or quickly be able to search them. The Software Center's better for discovering new software.
Thanks seasons. Makes sense.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 06:15 PM   #10
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachboy2 View Post
Gregg,

I agree with reinfro555 and seasons.

If you know the name of the software you require, it is much faster to type the list in Terminal.

If you are unsure about the name of the software, look in Ubuntu Software Centre:

System > Administration > Ubuntu Software Centre.

The latter way is much slower because you are searching for packages and then installing each one separately.

Long-winded!

C'mon Gregg, man up and use the command line! You are a writer after all, so your fingers will be a blur in Terminal!

You know you can do it.
Ha ha--you're shaming me into this!!
 
Old 05-29-2016, 06:17 PM   #11
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offgridguy View Post
I agree with the other sentiments expressed already. I only use the software center to find the correct name and spelling of the packages I want.
Thanks offgridguy. Hadn't thought of needing the correct name and proper spelling issue.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 06:19 PM   #12
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardvark71 View Post
Hi Gregg...

Just my opinion but I think the Software Center makes the process more a little more simple for the beginning user. However, I admit that I've not used it that much at all and don't know everything about it. I'm a Synaptic fan and I either is it or the command line to install software.

Regards...
Hey ardvark. I like the Software Center, but it does seem slow--getting there and downloading from there. Besides, beachboy2 is shaming me into using the terminal--LOL.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 06:22 PM   #13
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachboy2 View Post
Gregg,

As offgridguy states:



Let's say you want to install True Type Core Fonts from Microsoft and Back In Time, plus several other items whose names you already know, such as gimp, kate, shutter.

With the first 2, SC reports ttf-mscorefonts-installer and backintime-gnome (or backintime-kde).

In Terminal you would run:

Code:
sudo apt-get install ttf-mscorefonts-installer backintime-gnome gimp kate shutter
and install 5 for the price of 1.

Easy and much more efficient!
Ha ha. I tried your multiple download and it didn't work! I did it for shutter and clipman and the computer couldn't find clipman. But clipman was in Synaptic. But you've convinced me about the terminal. It's so fast. Thanks.
 
Old 05-29-2016, 06:38 PM   #14
beachboy2
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Gregg,

Good for you.

Well done.

So many people ask for the "best" or "optimal" way to do things.

There is usually never a "best" way or a "best" laptop etc.

Just be aware of the different options available to you and act accordingly.
 
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Old 05-29-2016, 07:02 PM   #15
Captain Pinkeye
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg Bell View Post
Most of the software I want is in the Ubuntu Software Center but some is not. And most of what is in the Ubuntu Software Center is also in Synaptic.
Just an (maybe) interesting point: the Ubuntu Software Center in 16.04 is actually rebranded Gnome Software Center. Gnome software center developers had this interesting idea that in GUI package installer there should be only GUI programs available -- since if you're willing to use CLI alternatives you're most likely able to install software via the terminal. That's why the Software Center doesn't show all the software included.

I don't quite understand why the Ubuntu team changed its software center but forgot to tell the users about such things.
 
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