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Old 02-07-2005, 12:35 PM   #1
Sir Loin
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How do you install programs?


I recently installed linux and I went to install Mozilla Firefox and it game me some weird file, I opened the file and it extracted the components into some folder, how do I install programs?
 
Old 02-07-2005, 12:47 PM   #2
perfect_circle
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well, it depends....
from your distro, from wether you downloaded source or binary,etc.

for firefox, did you download the version with the installer? (firefox-installer).
What distro do you use?

Last edited by perfect_circle; 02-07-2005 at 01:06 PM.
 
Old 02-07-2005, 01:05 PM   #3
Sir Loin
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I use Mandrakelinux 10.0.
 
Old 02-07-2005, 01:12 PM   #4
koen plessers
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Hello

OK, there are two ways to install programs.

The first way is to install so called precompiled binary executable files. Which one to use depends on your distribution. Red Hat, Fedora, Mandrake,... use the "rpm" format.

Installing or uninstalling binary executable files is done either using the tool provided with your distribution, e.g. Fedora Core 3:
Application -> System settings -> add/remove applications
or by using rpm at the command line:

install:
# rpm -ivh packagename.rpm

upgrade:
# rpm -Uvh packagename.rpm

uninstall:
# rpm -e packagename

The second way is to download and install a package as source code. To do this, you have to install the development tools provided by your distribution. Source code packages have file extensions like .tar.gz and ar often referred to as tarball.
First you copy a tarball into /usr/local/src.
Then you "untar" it:
# tar -xzvf tarball.tar.gz

You cd into the directory created by untarring the tarball, and you run configure:
# ./configure

Next comes make
# make

And make install
# make install

In the hypothecal case anything goes wrong, you might consult the INSTALL text file you find in the source code directory. Of course you might also consult this file before you start. But no one ever does...

And as always: have a lot of fun

Koen Plessers
 
Old 02-07-2005, 01:19 PM   #5
perfect_circle
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You probably have this one: firefox-1.0.installer.tar.gz

First of all in linux the best way to do things is with the console.
So open a console and type:
Code:
tar -xvzf  firefox-1.0.installer.tar.gz
to extract the archive.
then login as root:
Code:
su
then browse to the extracted directory:
Code:
cd firefox-something
there should be an installer you need to launch, something like:
Code:
./firefox-installer
this will pop-up a window to install it.
I recommend to install it in /usr/local/lib/firefox or /usr/local/lib/firefox-installer
Then do a link to the executable in your /usr/local/bin, to be able to launch the program without typing the whole path:
Code:
ln -s /usr/local/bin/firefox /usr/local/lib/firefox/firefox
then type exit to exit from root.
That's all. If you open a console and type firefox, you will be able to use it.
If you want you may then create a link in your desktop.
In kde do right click-> create launcher or something like that.

Last edited by perfect_circle; 02-07-2005 at 01:26 PM.
 
Old 02-07-2005, 01:24 PM   #6
perfect_circle
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Quote:
Originally posted by koen plessers
Hello

OK, there are two ways to install programs.

The first way is to install so called precompiled binary executable files. Which one to use depends on your distribution. Red Hat, Fedora, Mandrake,... use the "rpm" format.

Installing or uninstalling binary executable files is done either using the tool provided with your distribution, e.g. Fedora Core 3:
Application -> System settings -> add/remove applications
or by using rpm at the command line:

install:
# rpm -ivh packagename.rpm

upgrade:
# rpm -Uvh packagename.rpm

uninstall:
# rpm -e packagename

The second way is to download and install a package as source code. To do this, you have to install the development tools provided by your distribution. Source code packages have file extensions like .tar.gz and ar often referred to as tarball.
First you copy a tarball into /usr/local/src.
Then you "untar" it:
# tar -xzvf tarball.tar.gz

You cd into the directory created by untarring the tarball, and you run configure:
# ./configure

Next comes make
# make

And make install
# make install

In the hypothecal case anything goes wrong, you might consult the INSTALL text file you find in the source code directory. Of course you might also consult this file before you start. But no one ever does...

And as always: have a lot of fun

Koen Plessers
those are all correct but by default firefox comes with it's own installer in binary format. If you search the net you may find firefox in rpm versions packed but not by mozilla.
If you want you may download the source and try to compile it by yourself, but i do not recommend this. It's about 40 MB.
 
Old 02-07-2005, 01:32 PM   #7
Sir Loin
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oh, i switched from Windows Xp, it was WAY easier to install programs. Thanks for all of your help.
 
Old 02-07-2005, 01:41 PM   #8
perfect_circle
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in rpm format it's just one command. By easier you mean just clicking on next all the time. If you use linux for 1 month you'll find this really easy. A little typing won't harm you.

Quote:
Graphical user interfaces (GUIs) are helpful for many tasks, but they are not good for all tasks. I have long felt that most computers today do not use electricity. They instead seem to be powered by the "pumping" motion of the mouse! Computers were supposed to free us from manual labor, but how many times have you performed some task you felt sure the computer should be able to do? You ended up doing the work by tediously working the mouse. Pointing and clicking, pointing and clicking.

I once heard an author remark that when you are a child you use a computer by looking at the pictures. When you grow up, you learn to read and write. Welcome to Computer Literacy 101
 
Old 02-07-2005, 02:09 PM   #9
pevelius
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i was quite lost too, when i started. after a while i realized, that if i use the correct tools i donīt have to worry about anything.
so, i recommend you look at your distroīs packet management tools. they automate downloading, installing, updating and removing. after that, installing is way faster, better etc. than with windows. basically with some configuration your whole system and all programs installed afterwards are up to date like with windows update

i donīt know anything about mandrake, but a tool called apt is available to many distros to automate packet handling.

i use debian and if i want to install firefox i just write

apt-get install firefox

and thatīs it. after that, when firefox updates, i get it automatically with all other updates if i write

apt-get upgrade

there is a tool called synaptic package manager, which is a gui for apt. you can use it to click the programs you want. and they come preconfigured for your distro. however, mandrake may have itīs own similar system so you should really ask mandrake forum what people use.
 
Old 02-07-2005, 02:09 PM   #10
Padma
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Since you are using Mandrake, I can only suggest one thing: Easy Urpmi!

Go to the site, and follow the instructions there. (You *will* have to open a terminal (Konsole) window, and type in the commands it produces, but you can just cut & paste those. )

Once your urpmi sources are set up, installing new software is as easy as opening the Mandrake Control Center (Start --> System --> Configuration --> Configure Your Computer) and clicking the "Software Management" button. This brings up the Mandrake software tool (known as rpmdrake), from which you can install and remove software that has been tailored for your version of Mandrake. You can also run periodic updates for security patches /bugfixes from there. I even use it to upgrade my system when new releases come out (although I know how to fix it if that step breaks things ).

Certainly as easy as WinXP.

Just don't go grabbing "wild" programs willy-nilly from the internet. That's a sure way for a newbie to break a system. Very rarely is the solution you need not available from Mandrake through the MCC/urpmi.
 
Old 02-28-2005, 02:41 AM   #11
Francis
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Hi everyone,

I'm having trouble installing some packages and decided that I'd start again, uninstalling all the ones I'd installed, then building them into RPMs and installing them as RPMs. How would I go about uninstalling packages that were NOT installed as RPMs? Is there any special process, or would I have to dredge through my OS deleting them manually? (please say no!)
 
Old 02-28-2005, 04:50 AM   #12
perfect_circle
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if you installed them from source(./configure && make && make install), if you still have the tar.gz package, untar it, rerun configure with the same options as when you installed it, and do "make uninstall". Most packages offer this option, but not all.
Also, in case you did a standart install the default prefix is /usr/local, and not /usr were your default distro programs are installed, so it will be easy to track them. Also the locate command is your friend.
What distro do you use?
 
Old 02-28-2005, 11:50 PM   #13
Francis
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Ah sweet as, thanks for that. Yep I installed from source and still have the original tar package, aswell as the extracted tar package (I'll just do the uninstall from there?) I'm running Redhat 7.1.

Is it normal for a Linux Distro to install most of it's packages to /usr, and normal for most packages to install to /usr/local by default?

Sorry to sideline this thread (only a little though) I wasn't sure if it was worth starting a new thread or continuing the same topic with my question.

Cheers for the help, much appreciated,

Francis
 
Old 03-01-2005, 12:03 AM   #14
Thoughtscape
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Excellent. Also a problem of mine. Anyone know if the whole configure/make/make install is the same for Fedore Core 3?

Cheers guys,

Michael
 
Old 03-01-2005, 06:35 AM   #15
perfect_circle
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Quote:
Originally posted by Francis
Ah sweet as, thanks for that. Yep I installed from source and still have the original tar package, aswell as the extracted tar package (I'll just do the uninstall from there?) I'm running Redhat 7.1.
The point for doing the ./configure again was to make the exactly same Makefile as the one you had when you did "make install". If you did not remove the extracted tar package, just browse there and do make uninstall.
Also, there is a program called checkinstall, for installing source.
if you have it, instead of doing ./configure , make , make install, you do ./configure , make , checkinstall. The program will monitor what "make install" does, will pack it to rpm, and then install the program. SO if you do it this way, you don't need the extracted tar package any more. You can uninstall it the way you uninstall all rpms.
rpm -e <package name>
Quote:
Is it normal for a Linux Distro to install most of it's packages to /usr, and normal for most packages to install to /usr/local by default?
If you want you can change the prefix to /usr/ do ./configure --help
But it's a way to distinguish the distro programs and your programs. Installing a program without packing it first to /usr is not a good idea...there are thousand of files.


Quote:
Originally posted by Thoughtscape
Excellent. Also a problem of mine. Anyone know if the whole configure/make/make install is the same for Fedore Core 3?

Cheers guys,

Michael
The answer is yes. But the problem is that FC3 will not install by default the development packages, (compilers, make,...), so if you haven't done a full installation or did not tick the development packages when you choose what to install, you can't do that. there is an Add/remove utility in one of your menus (in gnome), to install things from the cd or remove something. Also in Fedora yum is your friend.

Last edited by perfect_circle; 03-01-2005 at 06:43 AM.
 
  


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