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Old 08-07-2005, 11:13 AM   #1
nobodyhere
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Good Newbie File Manager?


Hi, I'm very new to linux (less than a week). I'm interested to know a good file manager to use (eg like a Windows Explorer for debian). I'm currently running XFE which I heard had enough features for the average user, but doesn't seem capable of searching for a file. Or maybe I just haven't found it, it's not in the help file or the "edit" menu. I've read about Nautilus, Konquorer etc, but I'm not running KDE or Gnome and would rather keep it that way. I'm running that GUI you get when you type "startx" in console, not sure what the name is - but it's got a very basic (ugly) grey/black pixel background (it's fast and simple so I like it)

I'd like GUI but the main thing is to be able to search for files and fragments of filenames (eg like you search for "abc*.*" in windows). Oh, one more question, how come when you type "ls -laF" in console, it doesn't show all the directories (like /etc/)? Isnt the "-a" supposed to show all (normal and hidden) files?
I'm running woody, with all the files updated.

Oh wait, just thought of another question, about repositories for "apt-get". I understand that we edit the "sources.list" file in /etc/apt/ to add repositories, but how do I know what to write in there? The usual problem for me is this, I find a program I want to install on google, and theres an option to download a tarball, but I'd much rather add that address into my sources.list and let apt-get navigate the installation minefield. I've tried just putting the the web address which starts the download into "sources.list", but no dice. Also, are the two words that flank the address in "sources.list" necessary? I mean the ones which are usually "main stable" or "non-contrib unstable" etc... How do I know which ones are needed?

Thanks
nobody.
 
Old 08-07-2005, 11:33 AM   #2
freakyg
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Re: Good Newbie File Manager?

Quote:
Originally posted by nobodyhere
Good Newbie File Manager?

midnite commander
 
Old 08-07-2005, 11:53 AM   #3
funkatron
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Re: Good Newbie File Manager?

Quote:
Originally posted by nobodyhere
Oh, one more question, how come when you type "ls -laF" in console, it doesn't show all the directories (like /etc/)? Isnt the "-a" supposed to show all (normal and hidden) files?
ls shows files in the current directory when you login to a console the current directory is set to your home directory (/home/username or /root), to see the other directories you mention use "ls -laF /" to show files in /
 
Old 08-07-2005, 01:05 PM   #4
craigevil
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File manager - LinuxQuestions.org Wiki
http://wiki.linuxquestions.org/wiki/File_manager
 
Old 08-08-2005, 04:32 AM   #5
jonaskoelker
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Re: Good Newbie File Manager?

Quote:
Originally posted by nobodyhere
I'm running woody, with all the files updated.
meaning that in effect you run sarge?

Quote:
Oh wait, just thought of another question
I suggest putting unrelated questions in different threads--then each question can get a descriptive title.

Also, read ESR's `Smart Questions' FAQ (google it).

Quote:
I understand that we edit the "sources.list" file in /etc/apt/ to add repositories, but how do I know what to write in there?
If you have apt-setup installed (# apt-get install base-config), it will provide an ergonomic UI to configure sources.list; see below about main/... and stable/....

Quote:
The usual problem for me is this, I find a program I want to install on google, and theres an option to download a tarball, but I'd much rather add that address into my sources.list and let apt-get navigate the installation minefield. I've tried just putting the the web address which starts the download into "sources.list", but no dice.
First off: I'm glad you want to let apt do the dirty work.

But (the|a) proper way to do that is the following:

1) Find the package with your favorite package manager (apt-cache search NAME | less; synaptic -> find -> name = `NAME').
2) install it w. your favorite package manager (apt-get install NAME; ... synaptic should be intuitive).

The reason for this is that the tarball you find on the project homepage isn't `fitted' for debian; it'll probably work, but you'll have to do a lot of stuff manually (config, uninstall).

Quote:
Also, are the two words that flank the address in "sources.list" necessary? I mean the ones which are usually "main stable" or "non-contrib unstable" etc... How do I know which ones are needed?
main and unstable are all you need

seriously: read http://www.debian.org/distrib/packages/ for a short description of main/contrib/non-free and stable/testing/unstable

I recommend what I use: main and testing. I've encountered around three errors that made one or more programs completely unusable (until the next upgrade of the faulty package), but none of them made me unable to Get The Job Done, due to the fact that there are several `instances' of the same `class' of programs (i.e. four video players, six mail clients, twenty wms ).

I hope this answers your question. Otherwise, read the debian documentation, ask in #debian@irc.freenode.net:6667 or reply (or start a new thread) here.

btw, chapter 6 of the Debian GNU/Linux faq explains a bit about the package management system--maybe you'll understand *why* just pointer apt to a tarball won't work. Otherwise, google "debian package format", ".deb format" or similar.

hth --Jonas
 
Old 08-08-2005, 04:50 AM   #6
phil.d.g
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My particular file manager of choice is Xfe so I can't help you there I'm afraid.

To find files you can use the locate command; though you may need to update/initialise locate's database first -> `updatedb` or you could use find -> `man find` for more details
 
Old 08-08-2005, 09:07 AM   #7
nobodyhere
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See, that's whats so great about debian, so many people willing to help out.

Thanks for all the replies, they've all been very useful so far.

Btw, if any more linux newbies (like me) are reading this thread, I recommend
cmm.uklinux.net/steve/ntt.html (Newbie's Top Ten Commands) - actually puts you in the mood to learn some console commands
 
Old 08-08-2005, 09:30 AM   #8
powadha
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As for the filemanager I can recomend Krusader. It's a twin panel file manager for KDE, no problem running it in XFE (it will install some extra libs)

see it here:

Krusader

Remember, this is not a x window manager but a file manager to be use within a x window manager
 
Old 08-08-2005, 09:51 AM   #9
tuxdev
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I personally like EmelFM when it comes to the 2-pane approach. To search for files, the best option is really to open up a console and use the find command. Never really learned how to use it right.
 
Old 08-08-2005, 10:37 AM   #10
phil.d.g
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Quote:
Originally posted by powadha
no problem running it in XFE (it will install some extra libs)
ermm.. Xfe is a file manager not a window manger.
 
Old 08-09-2005, 09:01 AM   #11
powadha
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haha, true, I meant to say X or iceWM of whatever light window manager. Guess XFE got stuck in my mind somewhere
 
Old 08-09-2005, 12:29 PM   #12
craigevil
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Rox, it works great with Icewm. The file manager with Xfce xffm works well also.
 
  


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