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Old 06-08-2010, 08:06 AM   #1
virtualCoder
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free software license


Hi everybody,

I had a question: I wanted to release a game for free that I made but as a binary executable w/o the source code (I might release the source code later in the future). But I am not sure what license to use since there are so many out there.

I was looking at the free software licences like GPL or bsd licenses. What I am afraid of is accidently using a license that forces me to release the source code if someone asks for it.

I am okay with other people trying to re-distribute it or trying to modify the executable (but could that mean I am allowing people to make malicious modifications to it and redistribute it, I guess that would be illegal anyways irrespective of the license)?

Anyone stuck in my shoes earlier can provide some advice please? Anything else I should watch out for?

Thanks.

Last edited by virtualCoder; 06-08-2010 at 08:08 AM.
 
Old 06-08-2010, 08:14 AM   #2
posixculprit
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Why are you looking into free software licenses when your program is obviously not free software? The "free" in free software doesn't mean it costs no money.
 
Old 06-08-2010, 08:15 AM   #3
Hangdog42
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Quote:
I was looking at the free software licences like GPL or bsd licenses. What I am afraid of is accidently using a license that forces me to release the source code if someone asks for it.

Since the whole point of these sorts of licenses is to release the source code, if you're not planning on releasing it I would steer clear of any FOSS license. You might look at some of the shareware licenses used since most of those do revolve around distributing a binary only. If you do a google on shareware licenses you'll find a metric boatload of them out there ranging from simple to things that probably require a couple of herds of lawyers to interpret.

Quote:
I am okay with other people trying to re-distribute it or trying to modify the executable (but could that mean I am allowing people to make malicious modifications to it and redistribute it, I guess that would be illegal anyways irrespective of the license)?
If you're not distributing the code, then it seems highly unlikely that someone will modify the executable. They would have to reverse-engineer the binary, and that seems like more of a headache than it would be worth.
 
Old 06-08-2010, 08:55 AM   #4
MTK358
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The definition of Free Software is that people can see and modify the source code! It doesn't have anything to do with getting binaries for no cost.

If you don't, it's proprietary freeware.
 
Old 06-09-2010, 08:59 AM   #5
virtualCoder
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My bad. I meant freeware. Didnt know free software has to mean free source code (although I read all the free software licenses were implying that and it didnt make any sense to me).

Just found this line on wikipedia:

Quote:
Accordingly, freeware may or may not be free and open source software and, in order to distinguish, the Free Software Foundation asks users to avoid calling "freeware" free software
hehe, that was what I was doing.

By modifying the software, yes I was referring to reverse engineering. It would apply to more complicated softwares but I just wanted to specify that to make it easier to find a license.

Also, just found another line on wikipedia:

Quote:
Freeware is also different from shareware; the latter obliges the user to pay after some trial period or to gain additional functionality
So I guess I should be looking for a freeware license.

Thanks for getting me on the right track. Now that I know the correct terminology, it'll be easier to find the right license.

Last edited by virtualCoder; 06-09-2010 at 09:01 AM.
 
  


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